Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    63

    Is having the lockout on all the time bad for a rear shock?

    I find that the rear suspension is unnecessary most of the time, the thing that drove me to get a full suspension bike was to be on the safe side. I rode the trails before with no suspension at all and it wasn't manageable.

    I won't be going off drops or anything like that, I will just go over the occasional log, and hit roots and ruts along the way.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    10,351
    If the suspension works well you shouldn't need to lock it. If it's locked all the time you have the wrong bike.

    Will it damage the shock? I don't know but I can't see it doing any good. Even when locked, a fork or shock will move a little, maybe five millimetres or so. If you run a fork locked all the time the seals are constantly rubbing on the same spot and it can wear through the coating, I've seen this. The same will be true of the bushes. Instead of running up and down the stanchions they will be rubbing on there same spot all the time.

    I would try to adjust the shock so that it rides well when unlocked. That's what it is designed to do.

  3. #3
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,152
    Try this.
    1) Take the shock out of the frame.
    2) Measure the eyebolt-to-eyebolt dimension
    3) Find a durable steel tube, drill holes as far apart as the dimension in #2
    4) Bolt the steel tube in place of the shock
    5) Sell the shock and make some money

    This idea makes about as much sense as locking the suspension. As Pig said, if you don’t want to run your sus bike with the suspension open, you may have bought the wrong bike. Why not use the bike the way it was designed?
    =sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    23,397
    It all depends on your shock and if it is a true lock out or just something that makes the shocks compression harder and if it has a blow off designed into it. If it's just a shock like the RS RCT3 or Fox CTD, then there is no true lock out and the Fox I know for sure has a blow off built in.

    As Pig said though, makes no sense buying an FS bike, only to lock the rear out, could as well drop the weight and complexity of the FS for a HT. What I'd suggest if all you really want is a slight edge off the harshness is to pump the shock up so you're only getting 10-15% SAG and leave it in the open position.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,685
    Any decent fork or shock locks out by greatly increasing the low speed compression damping or closing it completely, which will yield to high speed damping in big hits. Cross country racers frequently ride with forks or shocks locked out to improve efficiency over smoother terrain, unlocking them when the terrain gets rougher and their speed benefits from active suspension. If that's what you want to do, you certainly can. Yeah, the stresses/strains and wear and tear on the bike are going to be somewhat different with the sus locked out, but I wouldn't allow that deter me from riding the bike the way I wanted.
    Do the math.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Joules's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,242
    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    It all depends on your shock and if it is a true lock out or just something that makes the shocks compression harder and if it has a blow off designed into it.


    sort of true, except for the fact that no shock has been made with a true lockout in at least 15 years. Every shock that fits a modern bike, the lever firms up the low-speed compression, rather than lock it out. Note that none of the shock companies use the term "lock out" anymore (they all call it pro pedal or floodgate or climb switch)

    I'd still recommend working on setup a bit more; shock can be firm without using the lever. But as Pig said, if you truly want it locked all the time, you bought the wrong bike.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    23,397
    I'd beg to differ, the X-Fusion RL shocks and forks have a hard as rock lock out, if you leave it in that and take a big hit, you'll fug it up. Fox also has made solid lock outs up to about 6-7 years ago, as a rock.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    sort of true, except for the fact that no shock has been made with a true lockout in at least 15 years. Every shock that fits a modern bike, the lever firms up the low-speed compression, rather than lock it out. Note that none of the shock companies use the term "lock out" anymore (they all call it pro pedal or floodgate or climb switch)

    I'd still recommend working on setup a bit more; shock can be firm without using the lever. But as Pig said, if you truly want it locked all the time, you bought the wrong bike.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Darth Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    907
    Do XC racers really play with their suspension settings mid-race, a couple of times a lap?

  9. #9
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,257
    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    Do XC racers really play with their suspension settings mid-race, a couple of times a lap?
    Only if they have bar mounted lockouts.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,685
    ...which is a very common feature on XC bikes.
    Do the math.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    166
    My Mach 6 has a fox float x (2016) and I ride it “locked out” (firm mode) on the pump/jump track all the time. It is not and issue and I still bottom out the shock in firm mode.

    It will not hurt the shock. It just closes off the low speed compression and everything goes though the high speed blow off washers. This more or less happens when you do a large jump anyway.

    Don’t over think it. If you like it is firm mode run it that way.

    Get on YouTube and google fox shock models. They have animated video about how they function.

    I would guess you would be faster on most trials with a mid damping setting though.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,715
    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    Do XC racers really play with their suspension settings mid-race, a couple of times a lap?
    yes

    With remote lock outs you can change settings mid climb in and out of lock as needed. With lock outs you can reach by hand it depends on how easily you can flip the switches while in motion. Some bikes/riders/trails it is easier than other times.

    XC racers will look for any advantage when racing.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

Similar Threads

  1. X-fusion Velvet having damper lockout on its own
    By reformed roadie in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-27-2015, 10:10 AM
  2. Replies: 24
    Last Post: 09-21-2012, 11:35 AM
  3. Serviced Fox Lockout lever having trouble reinstalling
    By brenrub in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-11-2012, 04:07 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-08-2012, 12:01 AM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-22-2011, 04:30 AM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.