Flat Pedal Riders - Your Ideal Pedal?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Flat Pedal Riders - Your Ideal Pedal?

    Last time I checked the "Clipless vs Flats Climbing and Descending" thread, it said 52.25% of AM riders, "ride up and down with flats!" So, what is your favorite flat pedal? Has anyone nailed it yet, or are you still on the hunt for the perfect pedal? If you were to design one from scratch, what would you do different from what is out there? Do you prefer a large or small platform? How much does weight matter? Bearings vs. Bushings a.k.a. free-spinning vs. minor drag? Large or small "Q-factor" (horizontal outside to outside distance)? Pedal thickness (I think we would all agree: thinner = better)? What did I miss?

  2. #2
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    shimano dx
    biker boy

  3. #3
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    Im currently riding on the Easton Flatboys, they are attached to a Sette Derro 2.0. The bike is 27lbs without pedals and with it didnt change but a fraction 27.2... I like flat I have rode only flat so Im biased. I like knowing I can bail out at any time. My buddies ride clipped in and I still can climb just as fast or hit jumps just as high. The studs on these flats are pretty gnarly!!! I have dug my calf into them already (my left leg looks like I got hit by a rattle snake.) I wear a pair of DC skate shoes when riding and the studs sink in pretty good for that dry/wet traction you need. IMO...
    Put em away wet, ride hard!!!

  4. #4
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    I use the Straightline AMP pedals with Ti spindle. Light, and so far so good.

    So now I ask, what about shoes? I've seen many possible options from 5:10 but I can't find any that's truly waterproof maybe with Gore-Tex membrane. For now, I'm using merrell trekking shoes with gore-tex. It grips ok though not good enough but at least it keep my feet dry in soaking wet parts of the trail. Maybe someone knows of a hiking or trekking gore tex shoes with great grip?

  5. #5
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    I've tried three different pedal sets... Kona Wah Wah's, Specialized Lo Pro Mag 2's, and I'm currently on a set of Prerunner's from Twenty6 Products. To me, the most important features in a pedal are platform dimensions and the pins. I prefer a large, low profile platform, with replaceable pins. Weight doesn't matter.

    The Wah Wah's were nice, but not perfect. They have a large, low profile platform, and gripped pretty well, but my feet still slipped quite a bit.

    The Lo Pro 2's came on my Pitch Pro. The were alright, but not as good as the Wah Wah's; smaller platform, and a lot more slippage.

    I have only done a few rides with the Prerunners, but I do believe I have found my perfect pedal. The platform size feels good, and the pins grip better than any others that I have used. Even when riding with a pair of Vans that are about 5 years old, my feet have not slipped off once.

  6. #6
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    twenty6

    I just built a new bike and found the new twenty6 Predators on sale at Bikebling. Sold. I live in Montana, so twenty6 has additional appeal for me beyond just being super nice pedals. I have used their Rallye and Prerunner pedals as well, and the Predators are markedly grippier, and I like the wider platform. I just hope they hold onto pins a little better than my Prerunners do.

    Canfield Brothers are coming out with a redesigned Crampon pedal in May, and it looks really good. If it had been available last month, I probably would have tried them.

    Flat Pedal Riders - Your Ideal Pedal?-img_1910.jpg

  7. #7
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    I didn't want to cloud the post with my ideas of an optimum pedal, but I'll throw down my want list. I have ridden Wellgo MG-1's, Loaded Precision AmX, Forte Convert and Straitline AMP pedals. All had their merits, but I couldn't call any of them my perfect pedal.

    Here's what I want in a pedal:

    Platform Size: The Loaded Precision pedal was the largest at 100mmx110mm. It felt big compared to the Wellgo MG-1s I rode previous to them. The Fortes are almost big enough. The AMPs are really too small for me. I think I would prefer something ~110mm x 110mm.

    Bearings v Bushings: I like Straitline's idea of using bushings! It allows the pedal spindle to be much larger, stiffer and stronger since bushings take up so much less space than bearings. They also have a much higher load capacity than a tiny ball bearing. I would probably explore using needle bearings in a pedal since they can carry much more load by virtue of creating a line load rather than the point load created by a ball bearing. Still, they take up more space than a bushing.

    Q-Factor: I am finding that I need pedals that have some distance from the cranks. The Spec. Enduro that the AMPs are on has very large chainstay and seatstay tubes. I end up catching my heels on the frame tubes since the pedals are so small and tucked in. I need a wider stance to avoid having to point my toes in excessively. I end up standing on the outer 3/4 of the AMPs which are already a small platform under my size 13's!

    Design: I appreciate the open design of the AMPs. DMR Vaults also look similarly open in the middle. Presumably the design is meant to shed mud. I also like the look. The regular Straitline pedals have a lot of solid area at the platform surface compared to those two. I don't ride in a lot of mud, but it has happened and it sucks when you can't just smash it through the pedal.

    Shape: The Loaded pedals were very flat. The Forte and AMP are concave. I never slipped off one of the Loaded pedals, but I like the feel of the concave pedals better.

    Thickness & Weight: These are less critical to me, but thinner and lighter = better as long as the strength is there.

  8. #8
    beater
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    Yeah, the small platform is why I skipped the AMPs. BB had them for a really good sale price, too.

  9. #9
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    deity ::: Compound Pedals

    cheap like 50 bucks. thin sticky. all parts easily replaceable. nylon bodies glide off rocks alot different then metal. only negative is the lack of concave. but its not actual problem
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  10. #10
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    Shimano DX with the longer pins.

  11. #11
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    i have ran the Deity pedals but the pins arent good in them, they stripped out after some rock garden bashing lol .. I cant even put new ones in cuz there is no threads to screw them in .. I change it uo tho, u ride clipless and on flats ... My next purchase on flats is from E-thirteen cuz i love all of their stuff and it works.

  12. #12
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    canfield crampons. I sold my first set with a bike, and regret doing so. I ended up buying another set, and I'm sticking with it.

  13. #13
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    i wanted to try the crampons, but honeslty, its too much money to risk not liking them. i worry about the bulge in the middle because i want concave pedals.

    so thats what i want, thin, concave, pins also in the center, pins longish, and prefer them threaded pin style. i'm looking at the Wah wahs and forte because they look the same to me

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertrider1 View Post
    canfield crampons. I sold my first set with a bike, and regret doing so. I ended up buying another set, and I'm sticking with it.
    Same here..very impressive pedals
    expensive cars are a waste of money. Expensive bikes...not so much!

  15. #15
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    Twenty6 Predators with 5.10 impact low shoes. Extremely grippy and a nice thin large platform for maximum balance and control.

  16. #16
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    just on some spank spikes and so far so good. have been on original straitline defactos for 3yrs til now. wanted to try a thinner profile. I like the difference it makes. However, i haven't found a pin design i like better than straitlines'. they allow the use of my 5.10s and my Vans without a blink.

  17. #17
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    Good job! Flats

    Azonic 420's. Put them on a hardtail that I converted to XM(cross mtn). My son also uses them on his Santa Cruz Heckler AM setup and he likes them better than the Shimano XTR Clipless Pedals. He claims it makes him a better rider because of the skills needed to move the bike around with being clipped in.
    Colors are cool, too.

  18. #18
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    Basically, for me they have to be thin, light(ish), wide, grippy, look good, and not cost much over $150. I prefer sharp pins to screws. The grip on the last 2 generations of twenty6 pedals has to be ridden to appreciate. It's crazy.

  19. #19
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    I feel thin is better but there's a point of diminishing returns. 100mmx100mm or larger is what I prefer. Bushings are great if done right, can be awful though. Slow spin preferred to fast but again, point of diminishing returns. Concave over flat, hex pins over grub or thread from the bottom. Pedals too close to the cranks are annoying.

    The new e13 pedal looks super nice: adjustable spin control, large platform, bearings, replaceable composite plates that should slide off rocks well, pins look sticky and should protect pedal body threads.

  20. #20
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    My favourites,

    Superstar CNC Mag ( Ti spindle )
    Welgo MG-1 ( with Ti spindle )
    Nukeproof Proton/Nukeproof Electron

    Quote Originally Posted by fritzd View Post
    So now I ask, what about shoes? I've seen many possible options from 5:10 but I can't find any that's truly waterproof maybe with Gore-Tex membrane.
    I just use 5.10's with SealSkinz socks, never came with my feet wet

  21. #21
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    That's easy IMHO, for a large platform:
    DMR Vault (with Ti Spindle)

  22. #22
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    Love my HT AE-01 EVO. (Pic stolen from google images)


  23. #23
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    For me it would be the old Easton Cully pedals, but with shorter pins. I find I have to unweight my feet a little more than I'd like to when I want to change my position on the pedals.

  24. #24
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    i like those HTs. i just can justify spending over a 100 on pedals though. Maybe if i knew they were the pedals of my dreams, that would be different. but too much to risk without putting a few rides on them!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    i like those HTs. i just can justify spending over a 100 on pedals though. Maybe if i knew they were the pedals of my dreams, that would be different. but too much to risk without putting a few rides on them!
    I agree, the ideal price would be around $100. Luckily I picked mine up for a little more than that but still less than what The Path Bike Shop ($139.99) and Fullerton Bike Shop ($119.99) sells them for.

    I want to see the new Canfield Crampons Version 2 coming out in May. I might be getting those too and selling the HT.

    For "budget" pedals, I've used the Kona Wah Wahs (altough their pins are way too small, not only in length but width as well), some Forte Converts and HT AN01 (Nano series). The last two mentioned have been great so far, cheap too, under $50.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by aedubber View Post
    i have ran the Deity pedals but the pins arent good in them.
    did you have the deity compound pedals?

    I got a pair of those since there was a big thread on them here and everyone was loving them

    I am definitely enjoying mine so far...I wonder if they'll hold up for a more than a year of riding like my other $100 pedals have. but they are very cheap, light, tall-grippy pins on a very wide platform

    those HT pedals look so nice. if i was gona get spendy on new pedals i think id go that route

  27. #27
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    Big wide foot size, thin, medium speed spin, very long pins. Brand is much less important.

  28. #28
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    I have the compounds. I love em. I have nailed the **** out of them downhill on rocks, still work perfect unlike mg-1s which will explode and lose pins. They are light, 339g, tall through-mounted pins, strong, and cheap- 50 bucks. All three, that never happens.

    So you know HT is the actual maker, nukeproof, deity, another company just stick their name on them. All the parts are replaceable too which is a nice feature.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    I agree, the ideal price would be around $100. Luckily I picked mine up for a little more than that but still less than what The Path Bike Shop ($139.99) and Fullerton Bike Shop ($119.99) sells them for.

    I want to see the new Canfield Crampons Version 2 coming out in May. I might be getting those too and selling the HT.

    For "budget" pedals, I've used the Kona Wah Wahs (altough their pins are way too small, not only in length but width as well), some Forte Converts and HT AN01 (Nano series). The last two mentioned have been great so far, cheap too, under $50.
    Good thing I saw your post because I was about to pick up a set of canfield crampons this weekend. I have a set of spank spikes right now that I'm "ehhhh...ok" with but want to try either point one or crampons.

    Can't wait to see what the version 2's will look like.

  30. #30
    see me rollin, they hatin
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    ^ what didnt you like about the spanks? i was looking at them....

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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    ^ what didnt you like about the spanks? i was looking at them....
    Not sure if you've seen the spank spike thread, but it seems like most people (including me) have an issue with them squeaking. One of their guys made one attempt to correct the problem, but it still persisted. I was then given the, "shrugoftheshoulderohwellnothingwecandoaboutit " thing.

  33. #33
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    Cheap for their weight. Azonic fusions. $25

  34. #34
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    I'd buy the Straitline Defecto (that the name?) pedals again. Later this summer, mine will be 3 years old with no issues at all. If they were a little thinner/lighter, that would be a nice upgrade but I'd want the same width, pin placement, & concave. Taking them apart for maintence (done one time) is easy too.

  35. #35
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    Sorry I should be a little more clear , I rode on the deity decoy 2.5 pedals and depends what you ride but the pins got smashed up bad . I'll try and get a pic up

    Quote Originally Posted by ride the biscuit View Post
    did you have the deity compound pedals?

    I got a pair of those since there was a big thread on them here and everyone was loving them

    I am definitely enjoying mine so far...I wonder if they'll hold up for a more than a year of riding like my other $100 pedals have. but they are very cheap, light, tall-grippy pins on a very wide platform

    those HT pedals look so nice. if i was gona get spendy on new pedals i think id go that route

  36. #36
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    I did the clipless thing for a year or so. I don't race so I found for my recreational riding they were just holding me back on the more technical trails. Decided to go back to flats after discovering 5.10 shoes and have never been happier.
    I have a cheap pair of wellgo flat pedals on my surly cross check and they are ok for road and light trail use. Though my feet tend to get a little numb over long rides with these smaller profile wellgo pedals and my 5.10s.
    For my mountain bikes I have NRG taster's choice and Nukeproof Neutron pedals on either one and these pedals both have a large surface area and thin profile and are very comfortable. With the screws in these i find my 5.10 freeride shoes get "stuck" to the pedals after a sketchy descent, where i have to pull my feet off the pedals to reposition them, so definitely no problem at all slipping off in the rough.
    So in my experience I'm a big fan of the thin profile wide platform pedals. Light weight but still lots of surface area so you don't lose your footing.

  37. #37
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    My favorite pedals, though I have never owned them due to the price is Crupi mini rounds.

    I use cheap larger diameter knock offs. Way back when were called Bear Traps. You slip you're scared for life LOL. Last I checked mini rounds were 200 bucks a pair. I can but like ten pairs of cheap knock offs for that.

  38. #38
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    I have some Wellgo B54s that I have been liking a lot. They are cheap, durable, concave, decent length pins, cromo spindle, decent weight, good size, and have good sealed bearings. I can clip rocks with them and not cringe because I scuffed some expensive ass bling pedals.

  39. #39
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    +1 on the HT's, but... You have to check out the Wellgo B-132's. Got them at Pricepoint for under $50.00 and have beat the snot out of them, and they are incredibly light ...Perfect combo with a pair of 5-10 shoes...
    for the price, I doubt I will buy anything else...

  40. #40
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    Wellgo LU-A52 Platform Pedals
    $40...They don't really hold your foot ever, but I always change position while riding and I hate not being able to move my feet without lifting them.

  41. #41
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    Specialized Lo Pro they'r Really good

  42. #42
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    Are the Canfield Crampons V.2 out yet?

  43. #43
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    spank spikes im convinced are the holy grail of flats. paired with some 510s its like riding clipless, but not.

    Sent from my LG-P930 using Tapatalk 2

  44. #44
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    spank spikes sound like two hamsters mating, with one of them not a willing participant. i regret ever buying mine. im back to my kona jack chits. cheap, quiet, reliable.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by flymybike View Post
    Shipping in mid June. Pics and more info will be a few more weeks. You may be able to find some spy photos of the protos.
    Are they manufactured in the USA or elsewhere?

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon View Post
    Are the Canfield Crampons V.2 out yet?
    Shipping in mid June. Pics and more info will be a few more weeks. You may be able to find some spy photos of the protos.
    https://canfieldbikes.com/
    Building bikes that make you smile!
    www.mtbparks.com
    All Bike Park, All the time.

  47. #47
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    Straightline de facto pedals with either 5.10 or Lake shoes! Stick like crazy!

  48. #48
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    I've been using the forte convert pedals. I've never had them slip off and hit me in the shin but beware, they would be cheese graters if they get you. I actually can feel "some" lift from them they grip to my shoes so well. They're cheap and come with replaceable pins which is a huge win for me. 1,000 miles on mine with some hits where I've looked down and expected my pedal to be bent but saw a chunk missing from the rock instead! I get looks at XC races when I use them and I actually get called names from the snobby guys. When I finished 2nd in Cat 2 with them on a 34 pound trail bike I felt like I had proven a point for us AM riders. Great Pedals for 50$.

  49. #49
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    Canfield is doing a version 2? I'll have to wait couple of weeks to see them. I'm also in the middle of trying to decide should I clip in or go to plat forms. I know "the Bike Company" sells HT's and if you call them they'll give you a better deal then purchasing on the website. I'm considering the HT's because of all the positive reviews and light weight (AE02's are 305 grams-not bad), but will now wait and see the Canfield version 2. If I clip in I have to buy shoes and cleats so I'm trying to decide. Here some pics of the HT's I'm looking at.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  50. #50
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    The HT02 look nice but i really don't like exposed axles ...

  51. #51
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    [QUOTE=bing!;9257796]spank spikes sound like two hamsters mating, with one of them not a willing participant. i regret ever buying mine. im back to my kona jack chits. cheap, quiet, reliable.[/QUOTE
    Lol mine didn't squeak for the first few rides now they do it sometimes.If they start doin it all the time might check out the new crampons.

  52. #52
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    well experienced the hamster mating call of the spank spikes for the first time today. had me laughing on the trail cus i had just read that comment before heading out. went away after a few minutes though. i guess the with new spikes they have fixed this issue.

    Sent from my LG-P930 using Tapatalk 2

  53. #53
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    I've pretty much fallen in love with the Nukeproof Proton/Neutron (rebranded HT, I think either the Protons or the Neutrons are basically the same as Deity Decoys, but with a less machining and 4mm setscrews as pins), not too expensive, fairly thin, not too heavy, they look decent, with the addition of longer pins (I think 4x8mm or 4x10mm) and 4mm nuts to give the pins a "step" and even a well worn-in and worn-out pair of 5.10s, they grip like E36 M3 to velcro but still let me rotate my foot if I really need to.

    I've also got a set of .1Racing Podiums (1st run off the CNC, got them half-off in the naming contest for picking the right name, but being the 2nd guy to do it, impressed that they did that even when they didn't have to) that I like a bit, I threw them on my 4" bike and got used to them, then rode a bit more DH on my 6" bike (with the nukeproofs) and when I went back, the .1s felt a bit sketchy, it felt a bit too easy to move my foot around, even on XC trails, so they got some 4-40x5/8" (I think, may have been 1/2"...) SS screws, which helped with that but are imho too long... in all honesty, and despite the pedals feeling much higher quality and having my only dealings with the company being completely awesome, I prefer the Nukeproofs for just about any kind of riding (although I could see the .1s being good DJ/slopestyle pedals, with the pins they ship with, if you're also using a crank stopper)

    All that being said, I think for my next trick I'm gonna try either the Nukeproof Electrons or the Deity Compounds (depending on what color I want and which I find the better deal on, they are essentially the same pedal), just to save a bit of money and weight the next time I build a bike (hopefully soon )
    Quote Originally Posted by teamdicky View Post
    My butthole would pucker and invert until I was inside-out before I got to the bottom.

  54. #54
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    I think this might be the best platform pedal I've seen just based on specs and pictures.

    Weight: sub 300 grams
    Concave: Yes
    Platform: 120mm x 100mm
    Thinness: 8-10mm

    It seems like it excels in all the typical categories one would consider.

    I saw this in a review.
    "Pins will shear upon severe impact saving the pedal body from fatal damage"
    Do other pedals like canfield, twenty6, ht, point ones, etc, have a problem of getting damaged from pins being ripped out, or is this simply marketing?


  55. #55
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    shimano dx

  56. #56
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    Once I wear out my MG-1 I wouldn't mind getting a pair of the HT.

  57. #57
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    IMO the HT's are the best bang for your buck hands down... They are light and flat, and extremely grippy with 5-10 shoes. I have been using them for years and will probably never switch to anything else.

  58. #58
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    I agree wholeheartedly on the HT's being the best bang for the buck. I got a pair off of ebay and won't ride anything else. They've got a great wide platform for my big feet, the pins are perfect for my 5-10's, they hold up well from rock strikes, they light, and they're got a reasonably thin profile. I really don't think I've ridden anything that even comes close.

  59. #59
    Nickel Havr
    Reputation: Eckstream1's Avatar
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    I found the Answer Rove pedals fit me and my budget the best...

    I also like the smooth pin design...
    Quote Originally Posted by William Blake
    Great things are done when men and mountains meet. This is not done by jostling in the street .

  60. #60
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eckstream1 View Post
    I found the Answer Rove pedals fit me and my budget the best...

    I also like the smooth pin design...
    I'm curious what you mean by smooth pin design?
    I too have Roves and I reprofiled each pin with a chainsaw file to give the pins
    a smaller, taller shape that I am much happier with (using 5.10 Freeriders).
    I like the OEM pin attachment design, but I felt the shape was too smooth!

  61. #61
    see me rollin, they hatin
    Reputation: NicoleB's Avatar
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    i'm guessing he means the non-threaded pins. I've ridden both. i tend to like the threaded screwlike pedal pins because of grip, but they are mega sharp. i'll never be a leg model.
    fap

  62. #62
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    Copy that. (my shins also paid a dear price for the transition to flats...)

    The threads are the main reason I tried modifiying the OEM pins first.
    Gained some more traction while keeping the razor edges at bay.

  63. #63
    humber river advocate
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    i use kona wah wah pedals... cheap, bash them off rocks, enough grip, rebuild-able...
    broadcasting from
    "the vinyl basement"

    build trail!

  64. #64
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eckstream1 View Post
    I found the Answer Rove pedals fit me and my budget the best...

    I also like the smooth pin design...

    This^ with 5-10impact's they stick well.
    I like to fart when I'm in front of you on a climb:skep:

  65. #65
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    Anything with with a large area, concave profile, at least 7 pins per side and around 17mm thick. Anything thinner than that tends to lose the concave profile and using less hortodox bearing systems, which I don't think is worth it

  66. #66
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael1 View Post
    I think this might be the best platform pedal I've seen just based on specs and pictures.

    Weight: sub 300 grams
    Concave: Yes
    Platform: 120mm x 100mm
    Thinness: 8-10mm

    It seems like it excels in all the typical categories one would consider.

    I saw this in a review.
    "Pins will shear upon severe impact saving the pedal body from fatal damage"
    Do other pedals like canfield, twenty6, ht, point ones, etc, have a problem of getting damaged from pins being ripped out, or is this simply marketing?

    order me a pair of these... we will see how they are!!

  67. #67
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    Shimano DX here too , like them a lot !!


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