Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 118

Thread: Fezzari?

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    284

    Fezzari?

    does anyone have one of the new fezzari la sal peak bikes? if so does anyone have it in the 27.5?
    looking for feedback on this bike.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    284
    lots of views, no replies? bike must be too new!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: One Pivot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    7,869
    Impressively aggressive geometry!

    Some of these smaller brands are coming out swinging.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    i took deliver of a la sal peak on Friday, but in the 29er format. I absolutely love it. I'm very tall with a long inseam and short arms. I've been waiting forever for someone to build a bike with a seat angle this steep. As I haven't bought a new bike since 2013, I went all out and got the top end build with the fox dampers front and rear. Some tweaks should improve the ride, but I cleaned more climbs than I ever have, and my friends assured me I was fasted descending than usual Bike feels great. Big purchase (for me) and I'm really happy so far.

  5. #5
    A waste of time it is is
    Reputation: emu26's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,317
    Wow, short TT on them.

  6. #6
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    5,262
    Aren't all Fezzaris open mold frames? So if you were capable you could get the same frame off Alibaba and build it up for cheaper, right? In the past the companies that sold open mold frames always lagged behind in terms of geometry, shock rate, pivot hardware, and kinematics. Have the new ones caught up? I think direct-to-consumer companies like YT or Commencal that design their own bikes provide a better product at a similar price.
    Keep the Country country.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    Lifetime warranty on the frame, and it's light. That's part of what sold me on it over a YT, Commencal, etc. That, and the geometry is exactly what I was looking for. I can't see this being an open mold frame, but I haven't scoured alibaba. The early reviews are very positive. We'll see if someone reputable does a long-term review.

  8. #8
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,549
    I got a four hour ride in on one of these today. Interesting. I didnít find it fun, nor playful. Just all business. If I were into racing enduros, or racing my buddies, this might be a good choice. But I ride for fun, for enjoyment, and the all business feel of this bike just didnít really do it for me.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    Aren't all Fezzaris open mold frames? So if you were capable you could get the same frame off Alibaba and build it up for cheaper, right? In the past the companies that sold open mold frames always lagged behind in terms of geometry, shock rate, pivot hardware, and kinematics. Have the new ones caught up? I think direct-to-consumer companies like YT or Commencal that design their own bikes provide a better product at a similar price.
    Nah, they design their own frames now. The Signal and La Sal are both original designs with "modern" geo. Lots of them on the trails in Utah now, with the headquarters just down the road from SLC.

  10. #10
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    5,262
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I got a four hour ride in on one of these today. Interesting. I didnít find it fun, nor playful. Just all business. If I were into racing enduros, or racing my buddies, this might be a good choice. But I ride for fun, for enjoyment, and the all business feel of this bike just didnít really do it for me.
    Did you play with suspension setup? Maybe both rebounds were slow? That's how I set up for some races (ground hugging traction style) and while fast it's far from playful.

    Also, my experience with my girlfriend's budget level Specialized Enduro 29 and my very high end custom build Capra 29 is the big travel, big wheel bikes can feel like a lead sled if you don't build them light. Those big gyroscopes are the opposite of nimble but a sub 1500g wheelset changes things considerably. When customers are shopping the sub $5000 bracket I remind them that a 27.5" bike is both lighter on the scale and much lighter accelerating or changing direction.
    Keep the Country country.

  11. #11
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,549
    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    Did you play with suspension setup? Maybe both rebounds were slow? That's how I set up for some races (ground hugging traction style) and while fast it's far from playful.

    Also, my experience with my girlfriend's budget level Specialized Enduro 29 and my very high end custom build Capra 29 is the big travel, big wheel bikes can feel like a lead sled if you don't build them light. Those big gyroscopes are the opposite of nimble but a sub 1500g wheelset changes things considerably. When customers are shopping the sub $5000 bracket I remind them that a 27.5" bike is both lighter on the scale and much lighter accelerating or changing direction.
    I did mess with sus quite a bit. Even wide open (the way I usually run my own bikes) on rebound and compression it just felt dead. I get that dead = fast in many situations, but fast-and-only-fast =/= fun for me these days.

    Agreed on wheels. This demo had some high end Race Face wheels. Didn't weigh them but they aren't garden variety tanks. It was really just the suspension. I think they hit the target they wanted to hit, I'm just not within that demographic.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jupiter58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    205
    They sold me a road bike a few years back, excellent support and value, as far as performance on the one you're interested in, so subjective how people rate bikes. the do offer a stellar return policy. there are reviews of the bike online

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    [QUOTE=mikesee;13845781]I did mess with sus quite a bit. Even wide open (the way I usually run my own bikes) on rebound and compression it just felt dead. I get that dead = fast in many situations, but fast-and-only-fast =/= fun for me these days.

    If you're running them wide open, they're going to eat all the bumps, thunder and small hucks you might have found playful - I would have thought you'd want to go the opposite direction and firm it up a bit. The shock rate is progressive, so this matches a lot of other bikes getting favourable reviews these days. Can I ask what else you've pedalled for long travel 29ers that you preferred or found playful?
    I've really enjoyed the bike so far - the short offset fork paired with a short stem is a revelation for me - the steering still feels crisp, which is a surprise for a 29er. I previously tested a GG Smash and a Transition Sentinel. Similar Geo on all 3, but the selling feature for the Fezzari was the frame - it's 2 pounds lighter than a Sentinel carbon and likely the same for the GG Smash. I find myself riding sections of trail faster than I have before, so yes, the bike is fast. If anything, I'm finding new features on my same old trails to hit and jump, and the bike feels poised and controlled.
    Also, I peddled my old bike yesterday for some trail work and it reminded me how much I like the seat angle on the La Sal.
    Anyway, I should probably hang up now - I'm sounding like a bit of a fanboy.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    152
    Powderturns,
    I looking to replace my Riot after next season. Thinking of the la sal peak as a candidate. Being faster than my friends is definately fun, so no issue there. How is it in tight technical stuff?

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    Stu - I'm finding it to a very quick steering, precise bike. The bars are plenty stiff and the short stem combined with short offset fork makes it easy to put the wheel exactly where you want it, even last second adjustments. The bike feels like it has a steeper head angle than it does, but still rolls over anything and descends steeps well. That's been a surprise and a revelation for me - I'm used to more lag in the steering, particularly for a 29er. That said, those are attributes (short stem and short offset fork) a lot of bikes have these days and not neccessarily unique to a la sal. The bike as a whole seems to handle low speed tech stuff well, though I haven't been out on a lot of those trails since getting it - just short sections of trail. I'll update or send a note when I do.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    36
    I just rode the La Sal yesterday. I absolutely loved the pedaling position. It was so steep that it felt like I was using different muscles than I'm used to using. I haven't checked my strava times on the climbing, but I almost don't care because it just felt good. It felt so good that the only other bike I think I'd be happy with now is something from Transition (I'm sure there are others with steep STA, just can't think of them now). As far as descending goes, it was way overkill for a flowy jump trail (Levitate, Draper UT). The steering definitely felt quicker than I'm used to so I'd love to get it on tighter singletrack. I rode the Signal Peak on the same trails and it was a lot more fun as it just felt like way less bike to throw around, but ironically I actually preferred the way the bigger bike climbed. That 3600 dollar build they have coming out in a few days looks like a great deal - carbon frame with the same suspension bits except the Lyrik is RCT3 instead of RC2.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by powderturns View Post
    Stu - I'm finding it to a very quick steering, precise bike. The bars are plenty stiff and the short stem combined with short offset fork makes it easy to put the wheel exactly where you want it, even last second adjustments. The bike feels like it has a steeper head angle than it does, but still rolls over anything and descends steeps well. That's been a surprise and a revelation for me - I'm used to more lag in the steering, particularly for a 29er. That said, those are attributes (short stem and short offset fork) a lot of bikes have these days and not neccessarily unique to a la sal. The bike as a whole seems to handle low speed tech stuff well, though I haven't been out on a lot of those trails since getting it - just short sections of trail. I'll update or send a note when I do.
    Thanks, for me one key handling trait for slow tech is the ability pull off a mini manual at a moment's notice to get the front tire out of trouble. Please let us know what you find out.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  18. #18
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,549
    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    Thanks, for me one key handling trait for slow tech is the ability pull off a mini manual at a moment's notice to get the front tire out of trouble. Please let us know what you find out.

    I think this bike -- like the Yeti SB and Scott Ransom I've demo'ed this week -- does best at speed. Slow down to walking/tech/chunk speeds and it becomes more of a handful.

    I rely perhaps too heavily on the mini-manual (aka panic manual) and it's just not happening on La Sal Peak, SB130, or Ransom.

    Not a knock on the bikes so much as a confirmation that they hit the target they were aiming at.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I think this bike -- like the Yeti SB and Scott Ransom I've demo'ed this week -- does best at speed. Slow down to walking/tech/chunk speeds and it becomes more of a handful.

    I rely perhaps too heavily on the mini-manual (aka panic manual) and it's just not happening on La Sal Peak, SB130, or Ransom.

    Not a knock on the bikes so much as a confirmation that they hit the target they were aiming at.
    Thanks, that is good info. It seems as if there are a lot choices for great bikes that can go up and down efficiently, but not slow and tight. All three situations are part of the program at many of the places we ride. Finding a bike that strikes the right balance is the holy grail.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by powderturns View Post
    i took deliver of a la sal peak on Friday, but in the 29er format. I absolutely love it. I'm very tall with a long inseam and short arms. I've been waiting forever for someone to build a bike with a seat angle this steep. As I haven't bought a new bike since 2013, I went all out and got the top end build with the fox dampers front and rear. Some tweaks should improve the ride, but I cleaned more climbs than I ever have, and my friends assured me I was fasted descending than usual Bike feels great. Big purchase (for me) and I'm really happy so far.
    Iím looking very seriously at this bike. How do you like the build quality?

    Is there anything that you donít like? Does anything feel cheap?

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by Apolonios View Post
    Iím looking very seriously at this bike. How do you like the build quality?

    Is there anything that you donít like? Does anything feel cheap?
    I sound like a deranged lunatic and my friends think Iím on their payroll but I love this bike. Some of the traits are about components as much as the frame itself (the 36 grip2 damper is pretty fine, and Iím running the float x2 on the back), but the bike has run well from day one. The derailleur limit on the low side was slightly off so I did derail the chain once (no damage and an easy fix). Cable lengths are all at an appropriate length, ends crimped properly, and no other issues with setup. No rattling cables in the frame either. The Reynolds hubs are fairly loud, but thatís not unique and an issue of personal tastes. Nothing has come loose and Iíve taken a quick pass over the bike once. I havenít adjusted the rear derailleur at all, so maybe the cable was pre-stretched, or maybe cables are better now than when I last purchased. One issue that is probably my fault - I have a marginal car rack that gets used on occasions (if other car is elsewhere) and the size of this frame is hard to mount. I have some slight abrasion from this, but itís very slight and basically my fault. Kind of sacrilegious to do this to a new bike. That said I think I might be the only person who notices it and have clear wrapped the frame in a few more spots as a result - a wise move with any new bike.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    Thanks, for me one key handling trait for slow tech is the ability pull off a mini manual at a moment's notice to get the front tire out of trouble. Please let us know what you find out.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    Iím not manual guy - not my forte. But Iím finding even at slow pace you can direct the wheel where you want on a moments notice with the short offset fork and short stem. I have found myself riding a few rock slabs and the bike has felt stable enough to go as slow as I want (to a near stop if I want) when picking my line and then rolling through. At pace youíre probably better off holding on and letting the 36 do itís thing.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    3

    Good job! Fezzari La Sal is a screamer of a bike.

    I bought the La Sal in XL immediately when it came out due to being tired of waiting for Ibis Ripmo stock. Fezzari quickly customized my bike by upgrading the fork to the Float 36 Factory Grip 2 and the shock to the Float X2 before shipping it out. I've since logged almost 200 miles on it and nearly 10,000 feet of elevation gain. The bike has been amazing and came setup with a great tune from Fezzari that I haven't had to modify at all.

    The La Sal isn't my first big travel bike and I've ridden a few similar bikes such as the Ibis Ripmo. However, this is by far my favorite and is easily more capable than the Ibis Ripmo for me. I've taken it on 15+ trails ranging from legit XC to bike parks like Trestle. I have excelled as a rider with the La Sal and it's reflected in all of my Strava segment times. I am presently chasing down some KOM's in areas that I was normally in the top 20%.

    Fezzari?-55fe9540b1e4cbf74363762f3df44f340c54e20e-1.jpgFezzari?-6d9758b5bf765d1b56ee111aa9c27e244123ef9c-1-1-.jpg


    Checkout this clip of me sending it.

    My recommendation is to buy this bike! Happy to answer any questions that you have about it.

    - mtbnooob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fezzari?-jumping.jpg  


  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by powderturns View Post
    Iím not manual guy - not my forte. But Iím finding even at slow pace you can direct the wheel where you want on a moments notice with the short offset fork and short stem. I have found myself riding a few rock slabs and the bike has felt stable enough to go as slow as I want (to a near stop if I want) when picking my line and then rolling through. At pace youíre probably better off holding on and letting the 36 do itís thing.
    Mr. Turns,
    Encouraging feedback. To be clear, I can't do a real manual to save my life. Today was wet leaves over slippery rocks and roots, exactly the conditions where being able to easily lift the front end by leaning back and tugging on the bars when you don't have momentum to roll over an obstacle is the difference between having a good ride vs frustrating ride.

    Until Mikesee's comments, I had always thought that short stays and a slack front end gauranteed that handling so I compared the geometry of the 3 bikes I know handle well - Kona Satori, Kona Process 111, Canfield Riot - vs the La Sal. The Fezzari had 1/2 inch longer wheelbase than the Process and Riot, every other number was within the range of the comparison bikes. The suprise was the 68 degree head angle which is steeper than expected. Anyway your positive reviews make it sound like the bike lives up to expectations.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

    Correction: the headset angle is 65 degrees, the site I used as a reference was wrong. A slacker headset angle should make this bike harder to keep pointed straight at slow speeds and make the front end easier to get up in the air.
    Last edited by Stu Pidassle; 10-29-2018 at 01:28 PM.

  25. #25
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    12,549
    Got 3+ hours in on a La Sal Peak today, on my backyard techy/chunky loops.

    I'd previously ridden this same bike a few weeks back, but it was freshly built, just pulled out of the box. A lot of my dislike for it back then came (I now realize) from the fact that the suspension was so new, not yet broken in. Really harsh, in short.

    It's been ridden a dozen+ times now, and on today's ride the suspension felt much, much better. I wouldn't go so far as to say I liked it -- it's still too "all business" for my tastes, with an overdamped compression feel on both ends -- but I'll say that now that it's broken in I disliked it a lot less.

    The main hangup for me on this bike is the geo. So long (it's a M, I typically ride size M, and it fits me in every way other than reach) that I just couldn't find the fore/aft balance point. I spent the bulk of the descents either washing the front wheel in corners or (when I'd climb more up over the front to get some grip) almost going out the front door when it was steep. And it's really, really hard to manual on short notice.

    I get that this geo makes sense for high speeds. Again I can only conclude that I am not the demographic that this bike is aimed at. Glad I got the second ride in to understand better.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LCBooger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    548
    I have about 600 miles on my La Sal Peak and it blows my mind. Prior to being on the La Sal I had a Hightower LT, Regular Hightower, Nomad 4 and several other high end bikes. This thing is the real deal!!

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,896
    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    Powderturns,
    I looking to replace my Riot after next season. Thinking of the la sal peak as a candidate. Being faster than my friends is definately fun, so no issue there. How is it in tight technical stuff?

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    The Riot is a shorter WB and quicker handling bike. A lot of bikes feel slugish when compared to it. The offering might be closer now. The HTLT isnt bad but i didn't like it without the custom Push shock. and hopefully the new Riot will be out next year.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    The Riot is a shorter WB and quicker handling bike. A lot of bikes feel slugish when compared to it. The offering might be closer now. The HTLT isnt bad but i didn't like it without the custom Push shock. and hopefully the new Riot will be out next year.
    No doubt the Riot is a great handling bike and a modern version would be a real contender. By the numbers the LSP has less than half an inch longer wheelbase and chainstays in size L. It has the same length chainstays and is half an inch shorter than the Process 111, which is another great handling bike. The LSP is considerably lighter than both bikes making it easier to push around. While I would expect some penalty due to the extra travel, the numbers say that the Fezzari should be a reasonably well handling bike. Unfortunately the only way to prove the theory is to ride one on my local trails. Luckily I am in no rush, it is Fat bike season.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,896
    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    No doubt the Riot is a great handling bike and a modern version would be a real contender. By the numbers the LSP has less than half an inch longer wheelbase and chainstays in size L. It has the same length chainstays and is half an inch shorter than the Process 111, which is another great handling bike. The LSP is considerably lighter than both bikes making it easier to push around. While I would expect some penalty due to the extra travel, the numbers say that the Fezzari should be a reasonably well handling bike. Unfortunately the only way to prove the theory is to ride one on my local trails. Luckily I am in no rush, it is Fat bike season.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    I stand corrected. I thought I looked at the Geo and thought "another really long bike. Im one a small Riot. I could fit a medium on this bike and get more reach...I'd love to try it.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I spent the bulk of the descents either washing the front wheel in corners or (when I'd climb more up over the front to get some grip) almost going out the front door when it was steep. And it's really, really hard to manual on short notice.
    Itís super important to ďload the frontĒ wheel on slack 29ers. If you donít youíll just be hanging on and not controlling the bike. If youíre used to smaller wheels itís scary to push so hard on the front, but the big wheels have a lot more stability and grip. If you feel like youíre going to go otb then you need more stack and maybe more fork air pressure. The La Sal has a pretty average stack, but it could certainly be taller, Iíd run a riser bar. Conveniently, the higher stack can really help provide leverage to manual.

  31. #31
    Ariolimax columbianus
    Reputation: nativeson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,468
    yo la sal peak owners/test riders. pulled da trigger, right in between sizes medium/large. fezzari is recommending medium (currently riding a 29er jeffsy large w/same size reach). just hoping you folks can share some body dimensions/info for sizing (what size your riding), size up or down, any other recommendations. hopefully this isn't a thread hijack, please help! cheers!

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    3

    Idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by nativeson View Post
    yo la sal peak owners/test riders. pulled da trigger, right in between sizes medium/large. fezzari is recommending medium (currently riding a 29er jeffsy large w/same size reach). just hoping you folks can share some body dimensions/info for sizing (what size your riding), size up or down, any other recommendations. hopefully this isn't a thread hijack, please help! cheers!
    I told them specifically that I wanted to be on an XL frame so I'm not sure what they would have recommended. I provided my stats as (weight: 222lbs, inseam: 34", torso: 28", shoulder: 21.5", arm: 26") with a general height of 6'3". The XL bike feels appropriately big and I have no regrets getting the XL. I've ridden large frames in the past and I'm generally ok with large but I wanted to try out an XL. I don't think there's anything I could do on a large that I couldn't do on an XL. It's probably just rider preference for you at this point.

    Fezzari?-yarp.jpg

    Ride on!
    Last edited by mtbnooob; 11-28-2018 at 08:55 AM.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792
    Fit is so subjective. If youíre between sizes better to ask yourself what type of riding you want to do and what kind of trails youíll be on most frequently. Be honest. Are you riding rough terrain flat out? If so definitely go large. If youíre always riding tight trails and rarely at full throttle go medium. Iím 5í10.5Ē or 179cm and would without a doubt go with a large.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by nativeson View Post
    yo la sal peak owners/test riders. pulled da trigger, right in between sizes medium/large. fezzari is recommending medium (currently riding a 29er jeffsy large w/same size reach). just hoping you folks can share some body dimensions/info for sizing (what size your riding), size up or down, any other recommendations. hopefully this isn't a thread hijack, please help! cheers!
    How tall are you?

    Iím considering getting this bike early next year and Iím too wondering which size.

    Iím 6í1Ē so I could go either way I suppose but Iím leaning more towards the large cuz of the seat tube height

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbnooob View Post
    I bought the La Sal in XL immediately when it came out due to being tired of waiting for Ibis Ripmo stock. Fezzari quickly customized my bike by upgrading the fork to the Float 36 Factory Grip 2 and the shock to the Float X2 before shipping it out. I've since logged almost 200 miles on it and nearly 10,000 feet of elevation gain. The bike has been amazing and came setup with a great tune from Fezzari that I haven't had to modify at all.

    The La Sal isn't my first big travel bike and I've ridden a few similar bikes such as the Ibis Ripmo. However, this is by far my favorite and is easily more capable than the Ibis Ripmo for me. I've taken it on 15+ trails ranging from legit XC to bike parks like Trestle. I have excelled as a rider with the La Sal and it's reflected in all of my Strava segment times. I am presently chasing down some KOM's in areas that I was normally in the top 20%.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	55fe9540b1e4cbf74363762f3df44f340c54e20e-1.jpg 
Views:	86 
Size:	409.4 KB 
ID:	1222454Click image for larger version. 

Name:	6d9758b5bf765d1b56ee111aa9c27e244123ef9c-1 (1).jpg 
Views:	79 
Size:	466.9 KB 
ID:	1222453


    Checkout this clip of me sending it.

    My recommendation is to buy this bike! Happy to answer any questions that you have about it.

    - mtbnooob
    I hadnít noticed your response from earlier on. Thatís a sweet ride.

    Question did you have to get the top end build to get the Fox suspension? On the website they only have as an option on the top one but on most reviews Iíve read they state that Fezzari will do a custom build.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by Apolonios View Post
    I hadnít noticed your response from earlier on. Thatís a sweet ride.

    Question did you have to get the top end build to get the Fox suspension? On the website they only have as an option on the top one but on most reviews Iíve read they state that Fezzari will do a custom build.
    Give them a call, and they will offer you the upgrade. Not sure why they don't add more customizations to their checkout process...

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Apolonios View Post
    I hadnít noticed your response from earlier on. Thatís a sweet ride.

    Question did you have to get the top end build to get the Fox suspension? On the website they only have as an option on the top one but on most reviews Iíve read they state that Fezzari will do a custom build.
    I opted for the elite build and spoke with the guys on the phone to customize the order to my liking. They were very easy to work with and seemed very flexible. I'm under the impression that they will do anything you want. I hadn't considered it at the time but for my next Fezzari bike, I'll probably have them build some wheels for me with a project 321 hub.

  38. #38
    Ariolimax columbianus
    Reputation: nativeson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,468
    Quote Originally Posted by Apolonios View Post
    How tall are you?

    Iím considering getting this bike early next year and Iím too wondering which size.

    Iím 6í1Ē so I could go either way I suppose but Iím leaning more towards the large cuz of the seat tube height
    I'm about 5'9.75", long torso. Probably go medium for shorter seat tube and same reach as my Jeffsy. Thanks for the help folks. Pretty stoked to ride this bike, customer service has been excellent. We live in Norcal about 20 minutes from Santa Cruz so I see a lot of the local brands way too much. Hope I get heckled because of my direct buy no name shredder.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792

    Fezzari?

    Iím sure you know this already but comparing reach is valuable for fit while standing. But with the super steep seat tube reach is not a good indicator of seated fit. When you look at the top tube length you see the medium la Sal is 53mm shorter than the large jeffsy. So you may feel really cramped on the medium la Sal. Iím only 2cm taller than you and would not consider the medium.


  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    61
    I had a very brief opportunity to stop by Fezzari a few weeks ago, and took a large for a parking lot spin. I'm about 5'11", and it felt really good. I'm currently waiting on my new Yeti SB150, which I went medium after proper demo'ing. Not sure if that helps you at all, but at least offering some comparison, as the La Sal sits smack dab in between the medium and large geo when compared to the Yeti.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792
    If anyone is e-curious sounds like Fezzari is getting in the game with a bang. They said theyíll be debuting the bike in a couple weeks with availability for Christmas. Few details they gave are:

    It'll be about 40lbs depending on the build, so quite light for it's class (but the lightest bike you'll ever pedal uphill regardless!).*

    We'll have three main builds at 3599, 4599, 5599.*

    Iím very very intrigued.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    To the guys here that have the La Sal, are you still digging it? Any issues or problems so far?

    I'm 6' 4" with a 34" inseam and currently riding a 2018 Giant Trance. The slacker STA puts me out over the back tire and the front end gets really light on steep climbs. I rode some more technical downhill with some chunky rocks and roots last weekend and I'm wanting a more capable bike with 29's. I've been considering the Transition Sentinel and the La Sal Peak.

    I'm really thinking about pulling the trigger on the Elite model. Contemplating upgrading to the Fox 36 and X2 though. The rest of that build looks great for what I need and want. I really like the steep STA of this bike. Let me know what you guys think, thanks.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792
    Iíve ridden the sentinel and own a smuggler. The steep sta makes a world of difference. Giant is still not fixing this, look at todayís Pinkbike review of the new trace for criticism of the slack sta. Iíd say either is an awesome bike. Iíd guess the fezzari will be slightly more playful than the sentinel, which is pretty enduro racey, super planted feeling bike.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    Iíve ridden the sentinel and own a smuggler. The steep sta makes a world of difference. Giant is still not fixing this, look at todayís Pinkbike review of the new trace for criticism of the slack sta. Iíd say either is an awesome bike. Iíd guess the fezzari will be slightly more playful than the sentinel, which is pretty enduro racey, super planted feeling bike.
    Thanks, I pedaled a large sentinel around the LBS last week. I probably should be on an XL. They set up the sag and I took it for a spin. It felt pretty good and I was really surprised it didn't feel as big as it looks on paper. There was a little hillside to play on but nothing big. Just dropping off a couple curbs I used almost all of the travel on the shock. I know it ramps up more at the end, but it concerns me as I've read that the rear end can be a little tricky to set up and often requires a larger volume spacer, not a deal breaker necessarily. Still not opposed to it completely, but really leaning towards the La Sal right now.



    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792
    Where do you live?

    Transition bikes in general have a pretty flat leverage rate, surprise for roudy bikes.

    Fezzari seems to be really awesome and open about nearly everything, but they do not publish any kinematics info. I asked for some info via email and they said to call them so they can go over it. Not sure what the LR looks like for the La Sal, but you can always call them to ask.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    I live in Washington about 3 hours south of the Transition HQ.

    I did like the feel of the rear suspension. It felt plush and smooth.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792
    After looking for info about fezzari online and YouTube it seems like most owners are in the mountain west. I havenít seen anyone with one in pnw

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    30
    The La Sal Peak has a pretty aggressive leverage ratio (23.7% change, 2.91 at sag and 2.22 at bottom out). It has a little bit of a regressive loop the last few mm of travel to help with the shock blowback on rebound. This leverage ratio make the bike really supple off the top and then give really good support thought the mid-stroke and bottom out. This also allowed us to tune the anti squat at just above 100% in all gears with a pretty flat curve to help the pedaling. We do offer the 30-day love it or return it guarantee on the bike as well. It is one we are really proud of.

    Here is an in depth video of how we designed the La Sal Peak:


    Fee free to reach out direct with any specific questions on the frame.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by tcwashers View Post
    The La Sal Peak has a pretty aggressive leverage ratio (23.7% change, 2.91 at sag and 2.22 at bottom out). It has a little bit of a regressive loop the last few mm of travel to help with the shock blowback on rebound. This leverage ratio make the bike really supple off the top and then give really good support thought the mid-stroke and bottom out. This also allowed us to tune the anti squat at just above 100% in all gears with a pretty flat curve to help the pedaling. We do offer the 30-day love it or return it guarantee on the bike as well. It is one we are really proud of.

    Here is an in depth video of how we designed the La Sal Peak:


    Fee free to reach out direct with any specific questions on the frame.
    Thanks for the video and the leverage info. The thing that draws me to this bike the most is the STA. The actual angle of 75 degrees is steeper than a lot of other bike effective angles. Being tall doesn't work so well when the seat is raised up above where the "effective" measurements are taken when the actual STA is 70 degrees.

    How does the Fox 36 and Float X2 change the ride?

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by 05stroker View Post
    To the guys here that have the La Sal, are you still digging it? Any issues or problems so far?

    I'm 6' 4" with a 34" inseam and currently riding a 2018 Giant Trance. The slacker STA puts me out over the back tire and the front end gets really light on steep climbs. I rode some more technical downhill with some chunky rocks and roots last weekend and I'm wanting a more capable bike with 29's. I've been considering the Transition Sentinel and the La Sal Peak.

    I'm really thinking about pulling the trigger on the Elite model. Contemplating upgrading to the Fox 36 and X2 though. The rest of that build looks great for what I need and want. I really like the steep STA of this bike. Let me know what you guys think, thanks.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Are you my twin? I'm 6'5" and I forget my inseam - it's more than 34" and they called to confirm the number... I love this bike. The seat tube angle changed climbing for me forever. As people slowly migrate to frames like this over the next 10 years, you can laugh at them. I'm still amazed how few reviewers notice this, and how many fall for the 75 deg effective angle, but 68 deg actual angle, which is especially punitive for us large guys. If anything as bikes size up, the seat tube angles should get steeper.
    Anyway, the bike - I got the 36 and the X2. The 36 is great - a big jump forward from prior generations Pikes, Lyriks and 36s, but this generation Lyrik is supposed to be phenomenal, with without the creaky CSU you can expect your Fox to develop over time. Mine is quiet so far, but the bike has been put away for winter - I live in the southern interior of BC. I really like the X2, but I almost feel I'm not getting enough out of it. Be prepared to spend some time on setup. I use all the travel, the support mid-stroke is great, I feel it could be a little more plush off the top. I'll play in spring - maybe a spacer and lower air pressure - not sure just yet. I'm also riding faster than I ever have, so maybe a bike is supposed to be a little chattery at high enough pace? I'm running the stock 2.3 tires, and might go 2.4 or 2.5 up front at least and that might help. I'm also not tubeless yet (new baby, would rather ride than work on the bike), so that should also reduce chatter. One other issue - I literally have considered riding with glasses or contacts again - I have a very light prescription and wear glasses while driving at night - everything else is fine. This sounds funny, but I go fast enough on this bike to make me want them riding... Will be interested to loan this to a few friends in spring to hear their reactions.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by 05stroker View Post
    Thanks for the video and the leverage info. The thing that draws me to this bike the most is the STA. The actual angle of 75 degrees is steeper than a lot of other bike effective angles. Being tall doesn't work so well when the seat is raised up above where the "effective" measurements are taken when the actual STA is 70 degrees.

    How does the Fox 36 and Float X2 change the ride?

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    That seat tube angle is pretty magical.

    In my opinion the Fox 36 grip2 and Lyrik RC2 are near identical. I feel the Lyrik rides a bit higher in the travel and has more for big hits. The Fox is more supportive for all out race mode.

    Same on the shocks. The X2 has a ton of adjustments which is awesome and is it downfall. It is a race shock and is amazing at sing active and hugging the ground. The Super Deluxe, in my opinion, is a set
    -it-and-forget-it setup and makes the bike lively and playful. Youíll spend a little time gettin the Fox dialed in. If you like to find the little extra hits and play around on the bike the super deluxe is a good setup. The X2 wants to go fast and take big hits. That being said I have set numerous PRs and top 10s on descents on the Lyrik/Super Deluxe combo. Both setups are amazing that is why we offer both.

    We sell about a 60/40 split Rockshox to Fox on the Elite and Pro builds if that is any help.

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by powderturns View Post
    Are you my twin? I'm 6'5" and I forget my inseam - it's more than 34" and they called to confirm the number... I love this bike. The seat tube angle changed climbing for me forever. As people slowly migrate to frames like this over the next 10 years, you can laugh at them. I'm still amazed how few reviewers notice this, and how many fall for the 75 deg effective angle, but 68 deg actual angle, which is especially punitive for us large guys. If anything as bikes size up, the seat tube angles should get steeper.
    Anyway, the bike - I got the 36 and the X2. The 36 is great - a big jump forward from prior generations Pikes, Lyriks and 36s, but this generation Lyrik is supposed to be phenomenal, with without the creaky CSU you can expect your Fox to develop over time. Mine is quiet so far, but the bike has been put away for winter - I live in the southern interior of BC. I really like the X2, but I almost feel I'm not getting enough out of it. Be prepared to spend some time on setup. I use all the travel, the support mid-stroke is great, I feel it could be a little more plush off the top. I'll play in spring - maybe a spacer and lower air pressure - not sure just yet. I'm also riding faster than I ever have, so maybe a bike is supposed to be a little chattery at high enough pace? I'm running the stock 2.3 tires, and might go 2.4 or 2.5 up front at least and that might help. I'm also not tubeless yet (new baby, would rather ride than work on the bike), so that should also reduce chatter. One other issue - I literally have considered riding with glasses or contacts again - I have a very light prescription and wear glasses while driving at night - everything else is fine. This sounds funny, but I go fast enough on this bike to make me want them riding... Will be interested to loan this to a few friends in spring to hear their reactions.
    Twins? Anything is possible. Maybe bike twins soon, lol. Yeah the actual seat tube angles are a killer for us tall guys. I'm glad you're loving this bike. I really haven't seen any negative reviews on it.

    I'm not sure which direction I'd go yet on the shock and fork. I've heard good things about the X2 and it seems like it would be really good on this frame. I could see it taking a little to get dialed in with the high and low speed compression and rebound. I'll have to give them a call and talk to them. Did you go with the olive green color or the concrete color?

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by tcwashers View Post
    That seat tube angle is pretty magical.

    In my opinion the Fox 36 grip2 and Lyrik RC2 are near identical. I feel the Lyrik rides a bit higher in the travel and has more for big hits. The Fox is more supportive for all out race mode.

    Same on the shocks. The X2 has a ton of adjustments which is awesome and is it downfall. It is a race shock and is amazing at sing active and hugging the ground. The Super Deluxe, in my opinion, is a set
    -it-and-forget-it setup and makes the bike lively and playful. Youíll spend a little time gettin the Fox dialed in. If you like to find the little extra hits and play around on the bike the super deluxe is a good setup. The X2 wants to go fast and take big hits. That being said I have set numerous PRs and top 10s on descents on the Lyrik/Super Deluxe combo. Both setups are amazing that is why we offer both.

    We sell about a 60/40 split Rockshox to Fox on the Elite and Pro builds if that is any help.
    Perfect, thanks. That's exactly what I was looking for. I think I would just stick with the Lyrik and super delux. Sounds like that may be a good option for all around performance and playfulness. Plus that concrete grey with the red fork looks pretty sweet in my opinion.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    61
    Fresh today... these guys were pretty reluctant to say good things, but they do.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rchy...LiIxQLGhWpkpJM
    Yeti SB150 - Dental Apprentice Edition

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleKinColorado View Post
    Fresh today... these guys were pretty reluctant to say good things, but they do.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rchy...LiIxQLGhWpkpJM
    That's a hell of a review... guys at Fezzari must be stoked - a review like this does a lot (for better or for worse) to legitimize this bike and the brand... I think they captured all the great things about the bike. This bike makes me want to ride more and when I'm riding, I want to ride longer.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    They really confirmed what I was looking for in that review. I've been going back and forth between this bike and the Sentinel. I'm pretty certain this will be my next bike. Now I just gotta sell one of my other toys and get this thing ordered.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792
    The thing they didnít say directly but kind of eluded to is the rear suspension is pretty firm throughout, making it a great all arounder. But not the best supple park/dh bike. Not a bad thing just a thing to note.

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    The thing they didnít say directly but kind of eluded to is the rear suspension is pretty firm throughout, making it a great all arounder. But not the best supple park/dh bike. Not a bad thing just a thing to note.
    Someone else on here was complaining that the bike was too supple, that it basically ate up every bump and hit in sight and therefore wasn't fun. Different strokes for different folks I guess. That, and maybe we're not all even speaking the same language...

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    792
    I havenít demod the bike so take it with a grain of salt. It is info Iíve got directly from owners and the bikes kinematics. Itís pretty damn progressive so I really donít understand how that could be true unless it was set up poorly. The Bible guys said it quickly hit a platform then sprung you back into the world, so thatís what I was referring to.

  61. #61
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    [QUOTE=powderturns;13847174]
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I did mess with sus quite a bit. Even wide open (the way I usually run my own bikes) on rebound and compression it just felt dead. I get that dead = fast in many situations, but fast-and-only-fast =/= fun for me these days.

    If you're running them wide open, they're going to eat all the bumps, thunder and small hucks you might have found playful - I would have thought you'd want to go the opposite direction and firm it up a bit. The shock rate is progressive, so this matches a lot of other bikes getting favourable reviews these days. Can I ask what else you've pedalled for long travel 29ers that you preferred or found playful?
    I've really enjoyed the bike so far - the short offset fork paired with a short stem is a revelation for me - the steering still feels crisp, which is a surprise for a 29er. I previously tested a GG Smash and a Transition Sentinel. Similar Geo on all 3, but the selling feature for the Fezzari was the frame - it's 2 pounds lighter than a Sentinel carbon and likely the same for the GG Smash. I find myself riding sections of trail faster than I have before, so yes, the bike is fast. If anything, I'm finding new features on my same old trails to hit and jump, and the bike feels poised and controlled.
    Also, I peddled my old bike yesterday for some trail work and it reminded me how much I like the seat angle on the La Sal.
    Anyway, I should probably hang up now - I'm sounding like a bit of a fanboy.
    Mikesee,

    Where you riding on an X2? I find that takes alot of time to adjust right but once there is great.

    Im looking at this vs Rallon atm

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Recently put a MRP Hazard on my La Sal Peak and it is so amazing!!




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by MTBEU View Post
    Recently put a MRP Hazard on my La Sal Peak and it is so amazing!!




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Did it change the pedaling efficiency at all? I was thinking with the progressive design this bike might work well with a coil.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by 05stroker View Post
    Did it change the pedaling efficiency at all? I was thinking with the progressive design this bike might work well with a coil.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Not at all. The Hazard has a pretty awesome lockout as well which is as efficient as any air shock lockout Iíve tried.

    Super impressive.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    What did you have on there before the Hazzard? Did you go for a standard coil? MRP is doing some really cool stuff.

  66. #66
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    Quote Originally Posted by MTBEU View Post
    Not at all. The Hazard has a pretty awesome lockout as well which is as efficient as any air shock lockout Iíve tried.

    Super impressive.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    How does it pair with the Lyrik? Which shock came stock, the x2 or rs?

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by powderturns View Post
    What did you have on there before the Hazzard? Did you go for a standard coil? MRP is doing some really cool stuff.
    I had the Super Deluxe that comes stock. I also have a DVO coil lying around, but havenít tried it yet.

    Both the air and coil have been awesome. I do love me a coil though, DH traction is hard to beat!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    How does it pair with the Lyrik? Which shock came stock, the x2 or rs?

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Iím kind of obsessing with matching my rear shock with the fork and right off the bat it felt amazing with the lyrik. I was kind of worried about it, but it was killer.

    I havenít tried the X2 yet on this bike, but have on several others. Need too. The RS has been super impressive so far.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  69. #69
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    The climbing proficiency makes sense looking at the seat tube. How does it pedal on flat ground? Im concerned with seated pedaling there will be too much weight on the bars. The reach is much shorter than other similar bikes.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Glad to hear the coil is working well. I am looking forward to getting my La Sal ordered.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71

    Fezzari?

    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    The climbing proficiency makes sense looking at the seat tube. How does it pedal on flat ground? Im concerned with seated pedaling there will be too much weight on the bars. The reach is much shorter than other similar bikes.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Pedals really well on flat, steep, etc. When you first jump on it itíll feel a bit different than anything youíve ridden, just give it a full ride before you form opinions. I did move my seat rails a bit further back than normal, maybe a centimeter, but I typically have my seat completely slammed forward where this is closer to normal.

    Iíd have a rough time going back to a slacker seat tube honestly. Itís complete game changer and think youíll see it becomes more of a trend.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    The climbing proficiency makes sense looking at the seat tube. How does it pedal on flat ground? Im concerned with seated pedaling there will be too much weight on the bars. The reach is much shorter than other similar bikes.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Reach? Or effective top tube? On an XL reach is 2mm longer than Ripmo(493) and 5mm shorter than the Sentinel(500). Top tube is 622mm on La Sal, 650mm on sentinel and 655mm on Ripmo. That's really just over an inch. Seat rails and stem could probably be adjusted a little to help out if needed. Being tall the slacker the seat tube for me the more a bike wants to lift the front end. The more I put the seat up the father it goes back.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by 05stroker View Post
    Glad to hear the coil is working well. I am looking forward to getting my La Sal ordered.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Which color are you thinking?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by MTBEU View Post
    Which color are you thinking?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm leaning towards the grey. I think I'd go with the olive if it wasn't matte.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by 05stroker View Post
    I'm leaning towards the grey. I think I'd go with the olive if it wasn't matte.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Every time I see the grey I wish I got grey, but another friend who has a grey La Sal says that about my green one haha. Canít go wrong I guess.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  76. #76
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    Quote Originally Posted by 05stroker View Post
    Reach? Or effective top tube? On an XL reach is 2mm longer than Ripmo(493) and 5mm shorter than the Sentinel(500). Top tube is 622mm on La Sal, 650mm on sentinel and 655mm on Ripmo. That's really just over an inch. Seat rails and stem could probably be adjusted a little to help out if needed. Being tall the slacker the seat tube for me the more a bike wants to lift the front end. The more I put the seat up the father it goes back.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Im short, 5'6", and feel the small is a touch to small like id be cramped and the medium is too big. My current bike has a 430mm reach and i use a 40mm stem. The reach on the small LSP is 420. I wouldnt want a stem longer than 40mm. I suppose i could slam the stem and rotate bars out a tiny bit.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    Im short, 5'6", and feel the small is a touch to small like id be cramped and the medium is too big. My current bike has a 430mm reach and i use a 40mm stem. The reach on the small LSP is 420. I wouldnt want a stem longer than 40mm. I suppose i could slam the stem and rotate bars out a tiny bit.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I usually ride a large with a 40mm stem and did bump up to 50mm on the La Sal. Works awesome!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by MTBEU View Post
    Every time I see the grey I wish I got grey, but another friend who has a grey La Sal says that about my green one haha. Canít go wrong I guess.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Haha, it changes for me every time I look at them. I think the grey with the red Lyrik looks really good. Then I think about upgrading to the Grip2 and X2 combo and think that would look killer with the green. That Kashima gold and green....

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    Im short, 5'6", and feel the small is a touch to small like id be cramped and the medium is too big. My current bike has a 430mm reach and i use a 40mm stem. The reach on the small LSP is 420. I wouldnt want a stem longer than 40mm. I suppose i could slam the stem and rotate bars out a tiny bit.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    You could always give them a call and see what they say. They do their 23 point measurement system to size the bike to each individual.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  80. #80
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    Ill give them a call after the holidays. Anyone have experience with how easily the LSP manuals? I suck at manuals and keeping the front of the bike up off of drops and jumps

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71

    Fezzari?

    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    Ill give them a call after the holidays. Anyone have experience with how easily the LSP manuals? I suck at manuals and keeping the front of the bike up off of drops and jumps

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Chainstays are super short.... it manuals really well!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  82. #82
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    Chainstays are short on my Rallon but its a bear to manual. It has a long front center and the Fox36 performance is a little heavy

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    Chainstays are short on my Rallon but its a bear to manual. It has a long front center and the Fox36 performance is a little heavy

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Been riding it since a few days after it was released. Manuals well. Have about 1,000 miles on it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    33
    Any ideas about the comparative Rallon VS Fezzari?

  85. #85
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by bartmikel View Post
    Any ideas about the comparative Rallon VS Fezzari?
    I currently own a Rallon and love it. Had to put it up for sale after I rode the La Sal.

    The Rallon is more of a bruiser on the DH. The La Sal felt a bit more nimble and manageable at speed, and not far off on the stability factor.

    One small detail that the La Sal wins on is cable management, which isn't critical to how a bike rides, but Fezzari nailed it - this bike is silent. One less distraction on the trail!

    I don't have a ton of time on the La Sal but will have a more in depth comparison soon.

  86. #86
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    Im more of a point and shoot, hang off the back and plow through stuff sort of rider. Fo you think the la sal can be ridden that way? Im concerned it maybe be too twitchy

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    Im more of a point and shoot, hang off the back and plow through stuff sort of rider. Fo you think the la sal can be ridden that way? Im concerned it maybe be too twitchy

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    It can absolutely be ridden that way. I guess what I meant is, that the two bikes are extremely similar but the La Sal feels a little more balanced in all aspects.

    By switching from the Orbea to the Fezzari, I feel like Iím gaining some climbing ability while losing nothing on the descents.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by ninguno View Post
    I currently own a Rallon and love it. Had to put it up for sale after I rode the La Sal.

    The Rallon is more of a bruiser on the DH. The La Sal felt a bit more nimble and manageable at speed, and not far off on the stability factor.

    One small detail that the La Sal wins on is cable management, which isn't critical to how a bike rides, but Fezzari nailed it - this bike is silent. One less distraction on the trail!

    I don't have a ton of time on the La Sal but will have a more in depth comparison soon.
    Very interested to hear this comparison. What shock did you choose for the La Sal ?

  89. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by robmac48 View Post
    Very interested to hear this comparison. What shock did you choose for the La Sal ?
    I went with the rockshox. Itís what I demoed the bike with. Most bikes and parts are incredible right now so itís tough to go wrong.

    I had issues with my X2 on my Rallon, and so did my dad (also on a Rallon). Air gets past the seal and causes ďsquelchingĒ when the shock cycles. Fox covered it under warranty but I was off my bike for two weeks. I donít know many people that have had those issues with the monarch. The demo Rallon I was set up on a year ago had the DPX2 and from what I can tell, the monarch feels a lot like that shock. Which is good.

    The ďoldĒ RC2 damper never really did it for me, but the GRIP2 is incredible. The Lyrik felt just as good to me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  90. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jpfurn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    484
    Those of you considering buying this bike without riding it first, I'd step back and take a deep breath....especially if this thread has persuaded you. This was a struggling brand due to many things, but one of which was them deciding to borrow the brand name Ferrari and swap a couple letters with z's. They were/are still desperate for some positive rep and are doing everything they can to get locals on their bikes and having them blow up the forums and social media with how amazing they are. Not hating on them as a company, it's just smart business. I'm just saying make sure you ride it for yourself like any other new bike purchase, instead of being sold by the reviews of brand locals and magazines that can't find anything wrong with a bike these days. One last note, buying a new bike is never a good investment, but these are real tough on resell. Be sure to make up your mind before the 30 day "Love it or Return it" expires.

  91. #91
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    Quote Originally Posted by jpfurn View Post
    Those of you considering buying this bike without riding it first, I'd step back and take a deep breath....especially if this thread has persuaded you. This was a struggling brand due to many things, but one of which was them deciding to borrow the brand name Ferrari and swap a couple letters with z's. They were/are still desperate for some positive rep and are doing everything they can to get locals on their bikes and having them blow up the forums and social media with how amazing they are. Not hating on them as a company, it's just smart business. I'm just saying make sure you ride it for yourself like any other new bike purchase, instead of being sold by the reviews of brand locals and magazines that can't find anything wrong with a bike these days. One last note, buying a new bike is never a good investment, but these are real tough on resell. Be sure to make up your mind before the 30 day "Love it or Return it" expires.
    I dont see what the bug deal is. I dont think the name Fezzari is cool but if it rides great i dont care. They could have named the company Tenla but who cares. I dont think bikes need to have cool names like evil or intense. In fact i bought an intense uzzi sl when they were unheard of and it was a great bike. I think it was my way of supporting innovators and risk takers.

    Not everyone can demo bikes. I also bought and evil insurgent and spot mayhem without demo and have enjoyed both bikes. I demoed Ibis and Yeti and eventually sold them a year or so after buying them. Just do your homework and understand what your getting. Some bikes wont work out for various reasons.

    I have not gotten a La Sal yet but if I do, Ill come back and share how it compares to the Rallon on riding now. The only reason im considering one is i have parts ready to go on a frame and their frames are priced resonably compared to Ibis, Yeti etc.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jpfurn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    484
    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    I dont see what the bug deal is. I dont think the name Fezzari is cool but if it rides great i dont care. They could have named the company Tenla but who cares. I dont think bikes need to have cool names like evil or intense. In fact i bought an intense uzzi sl when they were unheard of and it was a great bike. I think it was my way of supporting innovators and risk takers.

    Not everyone can demo bikes. I also bought and evil insurgent and spot mayhem without demo and have enjoyed both bikes. I demoed Ibis and Yeti and eventually sold them a year or so after buying them. Just do your homework and understand what your getting. Some bikes wont work out for various reasons.

    I have not gotten a La Sal yet but if I do, Ill come back and share how it compares to the Rallon on riding now. The only reason im considering one is i have parts ready to go on a frame and their frames are priced resonably compared to Ibis, Yeti etc.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I agree with you 100% on the points youíve made. But itís obvious this is not your first rodeo. I was directing my comments to those riders that are more on the fence about this purchase and probably have less expirience buying a new bike. Iím sure there are riders that this bike is perfect for, I just wanted to shine some light on the reviews that itís all rainbows and unicorns🤙🏼

  93. #93
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by jpfurn View Post
    Those of you considering buying this bike without riding it first, I'd step back and take a deep breath....especially if this thread has persuaded you. This was a struggling brand due to many things, but one of which was them deciding to borrow the brand name Ferrari and swap a couple letters with z's. They were/are still desperate for some positive rep and are doing everything they can to get locals on their bikes and having them blow up the forums and social media with how amazing they are. Not hating on them as a company, it's just smart business. I'm just saying make sure you ride it for yourself like any other new bike purchase, instead of being sold by the reviews of brand locals and magazines that can't find anything wrong with a bike these days. One last note, buying a new bike is never a good investment, but these are real tough on resell. Be sure to make up your mind before the 30 day "Love it or Return it" expires.
    I agree with you on one solitary point - demo the bike if possible. The rest of what you said is slightly misconstrued and just one persons interpretation of a company. Go visit them if you are local or call them on the phone if you are out of state. Couldnít find a nicer group of people in the industry! Then demo the LSP and youíll find pretty quick itís not about a desperate company trying to hype a product with no substance. Itís the real deal. Yeah theyíve got a lot of attention recently with the LSP, but maybe itís because itís an incredible bike at a great value?

    Iíve demoed just about every bike in this category at length, and most of them are fantastic. Websites and magazines surely receive some compensation for the glowing reviews, but itís honestly difficult to find faults in modern bikes. There have been 3-4 bikes in the last year that I couldnít mesh with, one was the old pivot 429, but most everyone else loved it.

    Itís understandable why you would have the concerns you have and itís certainly fair to warn potential buyers. Thatís exactly why they have the 30 day return policy. Because they believe in their product! So, to anyone on the fence that might have been swayed by this thread - Go out and demo one if possible!!




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  94. #94
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    122
    Anyone making any purchase should consider whatever factors are important to them, price, warranty, service, reputation, color, name, whatever... Bikes are no different.
    There are other brands that have had endless warranty issues and never seem to suffer in the eyes of the MTB press. Fezzari is not one of those. Even Trek and Spesh have issues around recalls, waits for replacement frames etc. Buying a bicycle has some risk.
    As for Fezzari, a 30 day tryout period? Lifetime warranty? Thatís persuasive to me. Theyíve surely sold loads of this bike already and thereís not a single post bitching about their service or breakage. Something has gone right with this bike and this company. Letís try look on the bright side for once. Btw I live in BC - not a local, and theyíve done nothing to entice me to write nice things, though they did send me a spare derailleur hanger for free. My only beef? The wait for the bike. Was promised 3-4 weeks and it was 5-6 back in September. And I wish Iíd gone with the gray frame - thatís on me.
    ETA: As for resale, the 4500$ version of this bike compares favorably to $6000 bikes from big, store brands. Hard to see getting killed on resale on this bike more than on any other bike.
    Last edited by powderturns; 3 Weeks Ago at 08:17 AM. Reason: Add point on resale

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    556

  96. #96
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by MTBEU View Post
    Every time I see the grey I wish I got grey, but another friend who has a grey La Sal says that about my green one haha. Canít go wrong I guess.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Did either of you get the frame protection direct from Fezzari? Or put any on after you got the bike? I have not had a carbon bike before and have seen a few others wrap their frames with the clear vinyl type wraps. If you don't have anything on the frame, how's the finish holding up? Does the matte green show scratches any worse than the grey?

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  97. #97
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by 05stroker View Post
    Did either of you get the frame protection direct from Fezzari? Or put any on after you got the bike? I have not had a carbon bike before and have seen a few others wrap their frames with the clear vinyl type wraps. If you don't have anything on the frame, how's the finish holding up? Does the matte green show scratches any worse than the grey?

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    I got some matte frame protection from a local clear bra franchise. They just gave me scraps and I installed myself. You canít even tell itís on it.

    Iíve seen gloss clear bra on it and you can tell a little more, but still looks great.

    I always recommend doing frame protection.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  98. #98
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by jpfurn View Post
    Those of you considering buying this bike without riding it first, I'd step back and take a deep breath....especially if this thread has persuaded you. This was a struggling brand due to many things, but one of which was them deciding to borrow the brand name Ferrari and swap a couple letters with z's. They were/are still desperate for some positive rep and are doing everything they can to get locals on their bikes and having them blow up the forums and social media with how amazing they are. Not hating on them as a company, it's just smart business. I'm just saying make sure you ride it for yourself like any other new bike purchase, instead of being sold by the reviews of brand locals and magazines that can't find anything wrong with a bike these days. One last note, buying a new bike is never a good investment, but these are real tough on resell. Be sure to make up your mind before the 30 day "Love it or Return it" expires.
    I completely agree. Definitely demo this bike! You will see for yourself how amazing it is.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  99. #99
    dmo
    dmo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    917
    Quote Originally Posted by MTBEU View Post
    I completely agree. Definitely demo this bike! You will see for yourself how amazing it is.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Cant decide between X2 or SDlux shock. Any advice? I prioritize climbing and pedalling flat sections over all out descending

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  100. #100
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTBEU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    Cant decide between X2 or SDlux shock. Any advice? I prioritize climbing and pedalling flat sections over all out descending

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I had a tough time deciding too, but Iím really happy I went with the Super Deluxe.

    Itís quite a bit lighter and I think every bit as impressive. Canít recommend it enough!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Thoughts on Fezzari
    By theClaw in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 07-18-2012, 10:21 AM
  2. New Fezzari Cascade Peak
    By d2mini in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 08-26-2011, 11:30 AM
  3. Stumpjumper FSR or Fezzari Abajo?
    By LiquidForce22 in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 05-09-2011, 04:25 AM
  4. Blowing my wad - Fezzari Nebo Peak
    By LIIT in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 100
    Last Post: 03-07-2011, 12:40 AM
  5. Changes to Fezzari FS Bikes
    By JimmyNeutron10101 in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-14-2011, 06:38 PM

Members who have read this thread: 402

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.