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Thread: Fezzari?

  1. #1
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    Fezzari?

    does anyone have one of the new fezzari la sal peak bikes? if so does anyone have it in the 27.5?
    looking for feedback on this bike.

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    lots of views, no replies? bike must be too new!

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    Impressively aggressive geometry!

    Some of these smaller brands are coming out swinging.
    WTB: Small aluminum hardtail 26 or 27.5 frame. Pm me!

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    i took deliver of a la sal peak on Friday, but in the 29er format. I absolutely love it. I'm very tall with a long inseam and short arms. I've been waiting forever for someone to build a bike with a seat angle this steep. As I haven't bought a new bike since 2013, I went all out and got the top end build with the fox dampers front and rear. Some tweaks should improve the ride, but I cleaned more climbs than I ever have, and my friends assured me I was fasted descending than usual Bike feels great. Big purchase (for me) and I'm really happy so far.

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    Wow, short TT on them.

  6. #6
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    Aren't all Fezzaris open mold frames? So if you were capable you could get the same frame off Alibaba and build it up for cheaper, right? In the past the companies that sold open mold frames always lagged behind in terms of geometry, shock rate, pivot hardware, and kinematics. Have the new ones caught up? I think direct-to-consumer companies like YT or Commencal that design their own bikes provide a better product at a similar price.
    Keep the Country country.

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    Lifetime warranty on the frame, and it's light. That's part of what sold me on it over a YT, Commencal, etc. That, and the geometry is exactly what I was looking for. I can't see this being an open mold frame, but I haven't scoured alibaba. The early reviews are very positive. We'll see if someone reputable does a long-term review.

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    I got a four hour ride in on one of these today. Interesting. I didnít find it fun, nor playful. Just all business. If I were into racing enduros, or racing my buddies, this might be a good choice. But I ride for fun, for enjoyment, and the all business feel of this bike just didnít really do it for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    Aren't all Fezzaris open mold frames? So if you were capable you could get the same frame off Alibaba and build it up for cheaper, right? In the past the companies that sold open mold frames always lagged behind in terms of geometry, shock rate, pivot hardware, and kinematics. Have the new ones caught up? I think direct-to-consumer companies like YT or Commencal that design their own bikes provide a better product at a similar price.
    Nah, they design their own frames now. The Signal and La Sal are both original designs with "modern" geo. Lots of them on the trails in Utah now, with the headquarters just down the road from SLC.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I got a four hour ride in on one of these today. Interesting. I didnít find it fun, nor playful. Just all business. If I were into racing enduros, or racing my buddies, this might be a good choice. But I ride for fun, for enjoyment, and the all business feel of this bike just didnít really do it for me.
    Did you play with suspension setup? Maybe both rebounds were slow? That's how I set up for some races (ground hugging traction style) and while fast it's far from playful.

    Also, my experience with my girlfriend's budget level Specialized Enduro 29 and my very high end custom build Capra 29 is the big travel, big wheel bikes can feel like a lead sled if you don't build them light. Those big gyroscopes are the opposite of nimble but a sub 1500g wheelset changes things considerably. When customers are shopping the sub $5000 bracket I remind them that a 27.5" bike is both lighter on the scale and much lighter accelerating or changing direction.
    Keep the Country country.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    Did you play with suspension setup? Maybe both rebounds were slow? That's how I set up for some races (ground hugging traction style) and while fast it's far from playful.

    Also, my experience with my girlfriend's budget level Specialized Enduro 29 and my very high end custom build Capra 29 is the big travel, big wheel bikes can feel like a lead sled if you don't build them light. Those big gyroscopes are the opposite of nimble but a sub 1500g wheelset changes things considerably. When customers are shopping the sub $5000 bracket I remind them that a 27.5" bike is both lighter on the scale and much lighter accelerating or changing direction.
    I did mess with sus quite a bit. Even wide open (the way I usually run my own bikes) on rebound and compression it just felt dead. I get that dead = fast in many situations, but fast-and-only-fast =/= fun for me these days.

    Agreed on wheels. This demo had some high end Race Face wheels. Didn't weigh them but they aren't garden variety tanks. It was really just the suspension. I think they hit the target they wanted to hit, I'm just not within that demographic.

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    They sold me a road bike a few years back, excellent support and value, as far as performance on the one you're interested in, so subjective how people rate bikes. the do offer a stellar return policy. there are reviews of the bike online

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    [QUOTE=mikesee;13845781]I did mess with sus quite a bit. Even wide open (the way I usually run my own bikes) on rebound and compression it just felt dead. I get that dead = fast in many situations, but fast-and-only-fast =/= fun for me these days.

    If you're running them wide open, they're going to eat all the bumps, thunder and small hucks you might have found playful - I would have thought you'd want to go the opposite direction and firm it up a bit. The shock rate is progressive, so this matches a lot of other bikes getting favourable reviews these days. Can I ask what else you've pedalled for long travel 29ers that you preferred or found playful?
    I've really enjoyed the bike so far - the short offset fork paired with a short stem is a revelation for me - the steering still feels crisp, which is a surprise for a 29er. I previously tested a GG Smash and a Transition Sentinel. Similar Geo on all 3, but the selling feature for the Fezzari was the frame - it's 2 pounds lighter than a Sentinel carbon and likely the same for the GG Smash. I find myself riding sections of trail faster than I have before, so yes, the bike is fast. If anything, I'm finding new features on my same old trails to hit and jump, and the bike feels poised and controlled.
    Also, I peddled my old bike yesterday for some trail work and it reminded me how much I like the seat angle on the La Sal.
    Anyway, I should probably hang up now - I'm sounding like a bit of a fanboy.

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    Powderturns,
    I looking to replace my Riot after next season. Thinking of the la sal peak as a candidate. Being faster than my friends is definately fun, so no issue there. How is it in tight technical stuff?

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

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    Stu - I'm finding it to a very quick steering, precise bike. The bars are plenty stiff and the short stem combined with short offset fork makes it easy to put the wheel exactly where you want it, even last second adjustments. The bike feels like it has a steeper head angle than it does, but still rolls over anything and descends steeps well. That's been a surprise and a revelation for me - I'm used to more lag in the steering, particularly for a 29er. That said, those are attributes (short stem and short offset fork) a lot of bikes have these days and not neccessarily unique to a la sal. The bike as a whole seems to handle low speed tech stuff well, though I haven't been out on a lot of those trails since getting it - just short sections of trail. I'll update or send a note when I do.

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    I just rode the La Sal yesterday. I absolutely loved the pedaling position. It was so steep that it felt like I was using different muscles than I'm used to using. I haven't checked my strava times on the climbing, but I almost don't care because it just felt good. It felt so good that the only other bike I think I'd be happy with now is something from Transition (I'm sure there are others with steep STA, just can't think of them now). As far as descending goes, it was way overkill for a flowy jump trail (Levitate, Draper UT). The steering definitely felt quicker than I'm used to so I'd love to get it on tighter singletrack. I rode the Signal Peak on the same trails and it was a lot more fun as it just felt like way less bike to throw around, but ironically I actually preferred the way the bigger bike climbed. That 3600 dollar build they have coming out in a few days looks like a great deal - carbon frame with the same suspension bits except the Lyrik is RCT3 instead of RC2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by powderturns View Post
    Stu - I'm finding it to a very quick steering, precise bike. The bars are plenty stiff and the short stem combined with short offset fork makes it easy to put the wheel exactly where you want it, even last second adjustments. The bike feels like it has a steeper head angle than it does, but still rolls over anything and descends steeps well. That's been a surprise and a revelation for me - I'm used to more lag in the steering, particularly for a 29er. That said, those are attributes (short stem and short offset fork) a lot of bikes have these days and not neccessarily unique to a la sal. The bike as a whole seems to handle low speed tech stuff well, though I haven't been out on a lot of those trails since getting it - just short sections of trail. I'll update or send a note when I do.
    Thanks, for me one key handling trait for slow tech is the ability pull off a mini manual at a moment's notice to get the front tire out of trouble. Please let us know what you find out.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    Thanks, for me one key handling trait for slow tech is the ability pull off a mini manual at a moment's notice to get the front tire out of trouble. Please let us know what you find out.

    I think this bike -- like the Yeti SB and Scott Ransom I've demo'ed this week -- does best at speed. Slow down to walking/tech/chunk speeds and it becomes more of a handful.

    I rely perhaps too heavily on the mini-manual (aka panic manual) and it's just not happening on La Sal Peak, SB130, or Ransom.

    Not a knock on the bikes so much as a confirmation that they hit the target they were aiming at.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I think this bike -- like the Yeti SB and Scott Ransom I've demo'ed this week -- does best at speed. Slow down to walking/tech/chunk speeds and it becomes more of a handful.

    I rely perhaps too heavily on the mini-manual (aka panic manual) and it's just not happening on La Sal Peak, SB130, or Ransom.

    Not a knock on the bikes so much as a confirmation that they hit the target they were aiming at.
    Thanks, that is good info. It seems as if there are a lot choices for great bikes that can go up and down efficiently, but not slow and tight. All three situations are part of the program at many of the places we ride. Finding a bike that strikes the right balance is the holy grail.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by powderturns View Post
    i took deliver of a la sal peak on Friday, but in the 29er format. I absolutely love it. I'm very tall with a long inseam and short arms. I've been waiting forever for someone to build a bike with a seat angle this steep. As I haven't bought a new bike since 2013, I went all out and got the top end build with the fox dampers front and rear. Some tweaks should improve the ride, but I cleaned more climbs than I ever have, and my friends assured me I was fasted descending than usual Bike feels great. Big purchase (for me) and I'm really happy so far.
    Iím looking very seriously at this bike. How do you like the build quality?

    Is there anything that you donít like? Does anything feel cheap?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Apolonios View Post
    Iím looking very seriously at this bike. How do you like the build quality?

    Is there anything that you donít like? Does anything feel cheap?
    I sound like a deranged lunatic and my friends think Iím on their payroll but I love this bike. Some of the traits are about components as much as the frame itself (the 36 grip2 damper is pretty fine, and Iím running the float x2 on the back), but the bike has run well from day one. The derailleur limit on the low side was slightly off so I did derail the chain once (no damage and an easy fix). Cable lengths are all at an appropriate length, ends crimped properly, and no other issues with setup. No rattling cables in the frame either. The Reynolds hubs are fairly loud, but thatís not unique and an issue of personal tastes. Nothing has come loose and Iíve taken a quick pass over the bike once. I havenít adjusted the rear derailleur at all, so maybe the cable was pre-stretched, or maybe cables are better now than when I last purchased. One issue that is probably my fault - I have a marginal car rack that gets used on occasions (if other car is elsewhere) and the size of this frame is hard to mount. I have some slight abrasion from this, but itís very slight and basically my fault. Kind of sacrilegious to do this to a new bike. That said I think I might be the only person who notices it and have clear wrapped the frame in a few more spots as a result - a wise move with any new bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    Thanks, for me one key handling trait for slow tech is the ability pull off a mini manual at a moment's notice to get the front tire out of trouble. Please let us know what you find out.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    Iím not manual guy - not my forte. But Iím finding even at slow pace you can direct the wheel where you want on a moments notice with the short offset fork and short stem. I have found myself riding a few rock slabs and the bike has felt stable enough to go as slow as I want (to a near stop if I want) when picking my line and then rolling through. At pace youíre probably better off holding on and letting the 36 do itís thing.

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    Good job! Fezzari La Sal is a screamer of a bike.

    I bought the La Sal in XL immediately when it came out due to being tired of waiting for Ibis Ripmo stock. Fezzari quickly customized my bike by upgrading the fork to the Float 36 Factory Grip 2 and the shock to the Float X2 before shipping it out. I've since logged almost 200 miles on it and nearly 10,000 feet of elevation gain. The bike has been amazing and came setup with a great tune from Fezzari that I haven't had to modify at all.

    The La Sal isn't my first big travel bike and I've ridden a few similar bikes such as the Ibis Ripmo. However, this is by far my favorite and is easily more capable than the Ibis Ripmo for me. I've taken it on 15+ trails ranging from legit XC to bike parks like Trestle. I have excelled as a rider with the La Sal and it's reflected in all of my Strava segment times. I am presently chasing down some KOM's in areas that I was normally in the top 20%.

    Fezzari?-55fe9540b1e4cbf74363762f3df44f340c54e20e-1.jpgFezzari?-6d9758b5bf765d1b56ee111aa9c27e244123ef9c-1-1-.jpg


    Checkout this clip of me sending it.

    My recommendation is to buy this bike! Happy to answer any questions that you have about it.

    - mtbnooob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fezzari?-jumping.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by powderturns View Post
    Iím not manual guy - not my forte. But Iím finding even at slow pace you can direct the wheel where you want on a moments notice with the short offset fork and short stem. I have found myself riding a few rock slabs and the bike has felt stable enough to go as slow as I want (to a near stop if I want) when picking my line and then rolling through. At pace youíre probably better off holding on and letting the 36 do itís thing.
    Mr. Turns,
    Encouraging feedback. To be clear, I can't do a real manual to save my life. Today was wet leaves over slippery rocks and roots, exactly the conditions where being able to easily lift the front end by leaning back and tugging on the bars when you don't have momentum to roll over an obstacle is the difference between having a good ride vs frustrating ride.

    Until Mikesee's comments, I had always thought that short stays and a slack front end gauranteed that handling so I compared the geometry of the 3 bikes I know handle well - Kona Satori, Kona Process 111, Canfield Riot - vs the La Sal. The Fezzari had 1/2 inch longer wheelbase than the Process and Riot, every other number was within the range of the comparison bikes. The suprise was the 68 degree head angle which is steeper than expected. Anyway your positive reviews make it sound like the bike lives up to expectations.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

    Correction: the headset angle is 65 degrees, the site I used as a reference was wrong. A slacker headset angle should make this bike harder to keep pointed straight at slow speeds and make the front end easier to get up in the air.
    Last edited by Stu Pidassle; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:28 PM.

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    Got 3+ hours in on a La Sal Peak today, on my backyard techy/chunky loops.

    I'd previously ridden this same bike a few weeks back, but it was freshly built, just pulled out of the box. A lot of my dislike for it back then came (I now realize) from the fact that the suspension was so new, not yet broken in. Really harsh, in short.

    It's been ridden a dozen+ times now, and on today's ride the suspension felt much, much better. I wouldn't go so far as to say I liked it -- it's still too "all business" for my tastes, with an overdamped compression feel on both ends -- but I'll say that now that it's broken in I disliked it a lot less.

    The main hangup for me on this bike is the geo. So long (it's a M, I typically ride size M, and it fits me in every way other than reach) that I just couldn't find the fore/aft balance point. I spent the bulk of the descents either washing the front wheel in corners or (when I'd climb more up over the front to get some grip) almost going out the front door when it was steep. And it's really, really hard to manual on short notice.

    I get that this geo makes sense for high speeds. Again I can only conclude that I am not the demographic that this bike is aimed at. Glad I got the second ride in to understand better.

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    I have about 600 miles on my La Sal Peak and it blows my mind. Prior to being on the La Sal I had a Hightower LT, Regular Hightower, Nomad 4 and several other high end bikes. This thing is the real deal!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    Powderturns,
    I looking to replace my Riot after next season. Thinking of the la sal peak as a candidate. Being faster than my friends is definately fun, so no issue there. How is it in tight technical stuff?

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    The Riot is a shorter WB and quicker handling bike. A lot of bikes feel slugish when compared to it. The offering might be closer now. The HTLT isnt bad but i didn't like it without the custom Push shock. and hopefully the new Riot will be out next year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    The Riot is a shorter WB and quicker handling bike. A lot of bikes feel slugish when compared to it. The offering might be closer now. The HTLT isnt bad but i didn't like it without the custom Push shock. and hopefully the new Riot will be out next year.
    No doubt the Riot is a great handling bike and a modern version would be a real contender. By the numbers the LSP has less than half an inch longer wheelbase and chainstays in size L. It has the same length chainstays and is half an inch shorter than the Process 111, which is another great handling bike. The LSP is considerably lighter than both bikes making it easier to push around. While I would expect some penalty due to the extra travel, the numbers say that the Fezzari should be a reasonably well handling bike. Unfortunately the only way to prove the theory is to ride one on my local trails. Luckily I am in no rush, it is Fat bike season.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    No doubt the Riot is a great handling bike and a modern version would be a real contender. By the numbers the LSP has less than half an inch longer wheelbase and chainstays in size L. It has the same length chainstays and is half an inch shorter than the Process 111, which is another great handling bike. The LSP is considerably lighter than both bikes making it easier to push around. While I would expect some penalty due to the extra travel, the numbers say that the Fezzari should be a reasonably well handling bike. Unfortunately the only way to prove the theory is to ride one on my local trails. Luckily I am in no rush, it is Fat bike season.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    I stand corrected. I thought I looked at the Geo and thought "another really long bike. Im one a small Riot. I could fit a medium on this bike and get more reach...I'd love to try it.

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