Cracking egg(beaters)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cracking egg(beaters)

    I've replaced my 165mm cranks with standard 175mm ones. I now find myself frequently hitting rocks when climbing gnarly trails. It used to happen about once a day, but now that my pedals are 10mm lower I hit half dozen granite chunks per ride. I just inspected my eggbeaters and found that one of them has a crack in the part that engages with the cleats... that explains why my left foot started slipping out so easily. Queston is, am I going to be ruining my pedals with regular frequency? Are eggbeaters just not fit for all mountain riding ??? I like the floating feeling and prefer them over SPDs but the later just seem more capable of taking the abuse. Any advice?

  2. #2
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    In reference to pedal strikes, you will find your brain will recalculate pedal stroke timing and clearance in just a few rides. Going from 165 to 175mm is a big adjustment. Riding different bikes with varying bottom bracket heights and crank arm lengths helps to teach you to plan your pedal strokes through obstacles. Avoiding strikes is one of the indicators of riding finesse.

    I also love my eggbeaters and have never had a failure even though i have had some violent pedal strikes from time to time. I once had a pedal strike so bad, it threw me and my bike yards off the trail. The secret to riding eggbeaters in all mountain conditions is to use a shoe with a very stiff sole. You might contact Crank Brothers to see if they will help you out with a warranty adjustment of some kind. Even if they don't fix your pedal under warranty, they will probably offer you replacements at a huge discount. Parts are also available to fix your pedal yourself if you choose. Stay on those gnarly trails and good luck.
    Consciousness, that annoying time between bike rides.

  3. #3
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    OP, great thread title BTW

    Quote Originally Posted by Lopaka View Post
    Avoiding strikes is one of the indicators of riding finesse.
    Couldn't agree more

  4. #4
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by az3075 View Post
    I've replaced my 165mm cranks with standard 175mm ones. I now find myself frequently hitting rocks when climbing gnarly trails. It used to happen about once a day, but now that my pedals are 10mm lower I hit half dozen granite chunks per ride. I just inspected my eggbeaters and found that one of them has a crack in the part that engages with the cleats... that explains why my left foot started slipping out so easily. Queston is, am I going to be ruining my pedals with regular frequency? Are eggbeaters just not fit for all mountain riding ??? I like the floating feeling and prefer them over SPDs but the later just seem more capable of taking the abuse. Any advice?
    The longer cranks will make your pedal stroke more powerful and will improve your ability to climb. But as the other posters have suggested, you will now have to make adjustments in your technique to avoid pedal strikes, ratcheting your pedals and timing your stroke around and between obstacles. Or put 650b wheels on your bike and raise your bb .75"

    I personally got sick of eggbeaters for their tendency to release the cleat on a pedal strike ( difficult to eliminate strikes 100%) so switched back to Shimano PDM-520, IMO, the best buy in clipless pedals.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

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