Converting a Trail mtb to an XC mtb- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Converting a Trail mtb to an XC mtb

    I have a trail bike with:
    100mm fork
    29 inch 2.25 tires
    760mm handlebars


    Does it worth to convert it to an XC mtb or I should sell it and buy an XC bike instead?


    If it worths converting, what should I change in order to became an XC mtb?

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    Quote Originally Posted by adenew View Post
    I have a trail bike with:
    100mm fork
    29 inch 2.25 tires
    760mm handlebars


    Does it worth to convert it to an XC mtb or I should sell it and buy an XC bike instead?


    If it worths converting, what should I change in order to became an XC mtb?
    100mm of travel is already XC, I donít know why you classified it as a trail bike. Also, the lack of mention of rear shock travel suggests that this is a hardtail, which at 100mm of front fork travel, points to your bike being an XC bike.
    2.25Ē tires are considered slightly slower tires for XC, but the tread pattern is more important, imho.

    Aside from that, you did not provide your current drivetrain specs, but tbh, any drivetrain is XC-worthy.



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    What about the 760mm raised (curved) handlebars? Should I replace it with a shorter flat (straight) handlebar?

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    Quote Originally Posted by adenew View Post
    What about the 760mm raised (curved) handlebars? Should I replace it with a shorter flat (straight) handlebar?
    That is entirely your preference. If youíre going to be doing XC races, I supposed a flatbar will be more useful, but YMMV.


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    I'd add a dropper post and call it good.
    I quit racing XC a few years back, gave my bike to my wife. I'm kinda getting the XC bug again and thinking of building up another XC bike. FS, 120mm travel minimum, 2.25 tires, wide bars and a dropper. Unless I'm racing pro UCI races, which I'm not( I'd race cat 1 50+), this bike will work out perfect
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    Quote Originally Posted by adenew View Post
    I have a trail bike with:
    100mm fork
    29 inch 2.25 tires
    760mm handlebars

    Does it worth to convert it to an XC mtb or I should sell it and buy an XC bike instead?

    If it worths converting, what should I change in order to became an XC mtb?
    As already mentioned, 100 mm isn't typically considered trail. But more importantly, what's it geometry like? Head tube angle? Chain stay length? Seat tube angle?

    Brand/model frame?
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    How is this a trail bike?
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    1X11 speeds. I will post a link

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    Pretty much by any metric I can think of, that would qualify as an XC bike. For XC racing, you might consider going clipless. But if you're just starting out racing, just race, then decide what you want to do after you gain some experience.
    Do the math.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    How is this a trail bike?
    For some strange reason, some people are convinced that anything that is ridden on MTB trails is a "trail"bike, and that XC bikes are something...other than that.

    Also, a "trail" bike, per many people, can be anything from a 100 to 160mm bike; I've seen bikes like the SB100, Blur TR, etc thrown into that category, as well as bikes like the SB150.

    Which is just nonsense, of course.
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    Quote Originally Posted by adenew View Post
    This is an XC bike by all definitions...


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    Quote Originally Posted by adenew View Post
    Seems like a nice bike. What are trying to accomplish, exactly?

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    Quote Originally Posted by adenew View Post
    Yeah, pretty much an XC bike. There's really no 'converting' it to a trail bike. It is what it is. Now, that doesn't mean you can't ride it on a trail. Before we had "trail" bikes, that's just what we did. Rode our XC bikes on everything.

    So, what can you do to make it more "trail-ish"?

    - Fatter tires.
    - Dropper post.
    - Bigger disks for more stopping, if needed.
    - A taller stem to raise your upper body up a little maybe.
    - Longer fork to rake it up and back, which artificially slackens the head tube and seat tube a little. Also moves your center of gravity back slightly.

    While this won't make it a trail bike, it may feel a little more like one, and maybe be a little more playful. I did the above (less dropper and disks) to my daughters Gary Fisher Tassajara GS a while back. It made it more playful, and a little more confident on more technical trails. But, still not a true trail geo/design.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow4eva View Post
    This is an XC bike by all definitions...


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    My thought as well. Limited travel, light weight at the expense of all out performance on the rough stuff, steep head angle, no dropper, tires with hardly any tread, 32mm fork.

    OP: you have an XC bike.

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    The fastest lightest tires you can find and BAM! you got yourself a XC race bike instead of a trail bike.

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    Bars ends... it needs bar ends. And you need spandex. Mission accomplished.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by adenew View Post
    If it worths converting, what should I change in order to became an XC mtb?
    You can't change a bike into something it's not.

    you haven't asked the question about what you're trying to do. Answer that question.

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    If you were looking to get competitive with racing, training first, but a light carbon-fiber-rim wheelset is usually a good investment, choose your tubeless tires carefully to be strong enough, but also light, and you can save some significant rotational weight.
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  20. #20
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    A 100mm hardtail is an XC bike already. Put some lighter wheels and fast tires on it and ride your bike.

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    OP... Sometimes folks get hung up on terms like XC, Enduro, Trail, All Mountain, etc. It would help if you share what specifically are you unhappy with on your current bike.

    Truth is, even with the right bike for the right terrain there are many variables and each person has their own preference regarding components, geo, bars, gearing, size, etc. so it helps to know details of what you would like to change.
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    GT seems to have categorized their better recreational hardtails as 'Trail'* and that probably got the OP slightly confused. Anyway, ditch the tires for lighter higher quality ones (like Bontrager XR2, Specialized Fast Trak) tubeless if possible and drop the bars lower by shuffling the spacers and you probably have an as good as any go-fast XC bike as you can get without dropping 2K+ on a carbon wonder.

    * GT is also listing a 'Sports Utility Bicycle'. I'm impressed but not in a good way.

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    So excuse me for sounding like a newbie. What is the difference between a Trail vs XC?
    Also what is the deal with a dropper post?
    What is AM mean?

    Is there a place on here where I can find what all the lingo means?

    Thank you

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    Quote Originally Posted by Foily View Post
    So excuse me for sounding like a newbie. What is the difference between a Trail vs XC?
    Also what is the deal with a dropper post?
    What is AM mean?

    Is there a place on here where I can find what all the lingo means?

    Thank you
    Not a huge difference between XC and trail, "XC" usually refers to something closer to the spectrum of XC racing OR lower-end bikes that don't handle aggressive conditions well. The XC race bike will usually handle aggressive conditions well, but becomes more dependent on the rider skill and bravery as compared to "bigger" bikes with more suspension travel and beefier parts. For the race-end of things, you don't have to be racing, some places in the US really favor a low-travel agile bike and more than 4" of travel just just bogging you down all the time, so "cross country".

    "Trail" is usually more of an "all-around" bike that suites most people. Not quite as efficient as an XC race bike, but with enough travel to handle most conditions that most riders will encounter. Think 120-140mm of travel. The amount of travel is not set in stone for this, but as a generality it's more often true than not.

    "All Mountain" is usually more of a "big climbs and gnarly descents" type bike, able to charge through nasty downhill terrain and chutes. More like 140-160mm of travel. For most riders, this would be bogging them down on the uphills AND the downhills, because most riders simply don't ride aggressive enough downhills to where this would be a better bike than the trail bike. But, if you live in such an area and want to push it more, then this becomes a better choice. Sometimes stronger riders will choose to ride these bikes even on big long rides (40 miles or more) due to the ability to pop off of every little obstacle and the abuse the bike can take. Among the more serious riders, I see this as the 2nd most popular bike after "trail".

    "Enduro" goes to the far end of the scale, just below "downhill". These bikes can be ridden uphill, but despite what the latest industry-review says, they don't pedal uphill well and are sluggish except when going downhill. These and AM bikes can work reasonably well in the bike parks, substituting for a DH bike (but there really is no substitute for a DH bike if you are going to ride the gnarliest trails downhill). Sometimes people choose these bikes because they think they'll be faster downhill, but it takes a pretty crazy gnarly DH trail to actually have that be the case, so the number of people that this is well suited to is usually pretty small, again, contrary to the marketing that you see that tries to push this stuff on everyone.

    So for most people, especially starting out, a "trail" bike is usually the best way to start, then you can decide whether you want to get more aggressive with XC and that kind of racing, or whether you want to get more aggressive with downhills.

    A dropper post is lever-actuated and allows you to lower the seat for descents, giving you far more control, resistance to endos, ability to corner better, brake better, and so on. Pretty much standard these days on all bikes except DH bikes. Lower end bikes will probably not have them as well, but this isn't really dependent on the category of bike anymore, like it was 5-10 years ago. Pretty much everyone has seen the benefits of this and most XCers are using them these days.

    Also, you can change a lot on a bike with different components, by changing the fork, wheels, tires, etc. Your frame is the "baseline" as far as what the bike is capable of, but the components and parts give you some wiggle room either way usually, to make a "trail" bike more XC or more all mountain.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foily View Post
    So excuse me for sounding like a newbie. What is the difference between a Trail vs XC?
    Also what is the deal with a dropper post?
    What is AM mean?

    Is there a place on here where I can find what all the lingo means?

    Thank you
    Jayem's response is great.



    At the low end, there's a lot of marketing bullshit. MTB enthusiasts aren't buying these bikes, so AM/Trail/XC/whatever, it's mostly what buzz words will resonate with outsiders and newbies.

    At a moderate price point, parts spec and smart design can make an 'inferior' model punch above its weight... but again they're selling to newbies who don't know what's important.

    A dropper post is basically an essential component for a bike that is a competent descender, and a designer can make a better frame if they know it will be paired to a dropper post. But dropper posts are expensive, and newbie budget buyers aren't going to understand that stuff...

    There's a whole market dedicated to predicting the weird purchasing behavior of newbies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Not a huge difference between XC and trail, "XC" usually refers to something closer to the spectrum of XC racing OR lower-end bikes that don't handle aggressive conditions well. The XC race bike will usually handle aggressive conditions well, but becomes more dependent on the rider skill and bravery as compared to "bigger" bikes with more suspension travel and beefier parts. For the race-end of things, you don't have to be racing, some places in the US really favor a low-travel agile bike and more than 4" of travel just just bogging you down all the time, so "cross country".

    "Trail" is usually more of an "all-around" bike that suites most people. Not quite as efficient as an XC race bike, but with enough travel to handle most conditions that most riders will encounter. Think 120-140mm of travel. The amount of travel is not set in stone for this, but as a generality it's more often true than not.

    "All Mountain" is usually more of a "big climbs and gnarly descents" type bike, able to charge through nasty downhill terrain and chutes. More like 140-160mm of travel. For most riders, this would be bogging them down on the uphills AND the downhills, because most riders simply don't ride aggressive enough downhills to where this would be a better bike than the trail bike. But, if you live in such an area and want to push it more, then this becomes a better choice. Sometimes stronger riders will choose to ride these bikes even on big long rides (40 miles or more) due to the ability to pop off of every little obstacle and the abuse the bike can take. Among the more serious riders, I see this as the 2nd most popular bike after "trail".

    "Enduro" goes to the far end of the scale, just below "downhill". These bikes can be ridden uphill, but despite what the latest industry-review says, they don't pedal uphill well and are sluggish except when going downhill. These and AM bikes can work reasonably well in the bike parks, substituting for a DH bike (but there really is no substitute for a DH bike if you are going to ride the gnarliest trails downhill). Sometimes people choose these bikes because they think they'll be faster downhill, but it takes a pretty crazy gnarly DH trail to actually have that be the case, so the number of people that this is well suited to is usually pretty small, again, contrary to the marketing that you see that tries to push this stuff on everyone.

    So for most people, especially starting out, a "trail" bike is usually the best way to start, then you can decide whether you want to get more aggressive with XC and that kind of racing, or whether you want to get more aggressive with downhills.

    A dropper post is lever-actuated and allows you to lower the seat for descents, giving you far more control, resistance to endos, ability to corner better, brake better, and so on. Pretty much standard these days on all bikes except DH bikes. Lower end bikes will probably not have them as well, but this isn't really dependent on the category of bike anymore, like it was 5-10 years ago. Pretty much everyone has seen the benefits of this and most XCers are using them these days.

    Also, you can change a lot on a bike with different components, by changing the fork, wheels, tires, etc. Your frame is the "baseline" as far as what the bike is capable of, but the components and parts give you some wiggle room either way usually, to make a "trail" bike more XC or more all mountain.
    This about covers it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Not a huge difference between XC and trail, "XC" usually refers to something closer to the spectrum of XC racing OR lower-end bikes that don't handle aggressive conditions well. The XC race bike will usually handle aggressive conditions well, but becomes more dependent on the rider skill and bravery as compared to "bigger" bikes with more suspension travel and beefier parts. For the race-end of things, you don't have to be racing, some places in the US really favor a low-travel agile bike and more than 4" of travel just just bogging you down all the time, so "cross country".

    "Trail" is usually more of an "all-around" bike that suites most people. Not quite as efficient as an XC race bike, but with enough travel to handle most conditions that most riders will encounter. Think 120-140mm of travel. The amount of travel is not set in stone for this, but as a generality it's more often true than not.

    "All Mountain" is usually more of a "big climbs and gnarly descents" type bike, able to charge through nasty downhill terrain and chutes. More like 140-160mm of travel. For most riders, this would be bogging them down on the uphills AND the downhills, because most riders simply don't ride aggressive enough downhills to where this would be a better bike than the trail bike. But, if you live in such an area and want to push it more, then this becomes a better choice. Sometimes stronger riders will choose to ride these bikes even on big long rides (40 miles or more) due to the ability to pop off of every little obstacle and the abuse the bike can take. Among the more serious riders, I see this as the 2nd most popular bike after "trail".

    "Enduro" goes to the far end of the scale, just below "downhill". These bikes can be ridden uphill, but despite what the latest industry-review says, they don't pedal uphill well and are sluggish except when going downhill. These and AM bikes can work reasonably well in the bike parks, substituting for a DH bike (but there really is no substitute for a DH bike if you are going to ride the gnarliest trails downhill). Sometimes people choose these bikes because they think they'll be faster downhill, but it takes a pretty crazy gnarly DH trail to actually have that be the case, so the number of people that this is well suited to is usually pretty small, again, contrary to the marketing that you see that tries to push this stuff on everyone.

    So for most people, especially starting out, a "trail" bike is usually the best way to start, then you can decide whether you want to get more aggressive with XC and that kind of racing, or whether you want to get more aggressive with downhills.

    A dropper post is lever-actuated and allows you to lower the seat for descents, giving you far more control, resistance to endos, ability to corner better, brake better, and so on. Pretty much standard these days on all bikes except DH bikes. Lower end bikes will probably not have them as well, but this isn't really dependent on the category of bike anymore, like it was 5-10 years ago. Pretty much everyone has seen the benefits of this and most XCers are using them these days.

    Also, you can change a lot on a bike with different components, by changing the fork, wheels, tires, etc. Your frame is the "baseline" as far as what the bike is capable of, but the components and parts give you some wiggle room either way usually, to make a "trail" bike more XC or more all mountain.
    Wow, thank you so much for that! I don't currently own a MTB, but I am considering making a purchase perhaps by the end of the year. I am hoping to try some out at a Demo day if one pops up in my area (Bucks County,PA) I have a family so the bike would double as something to take the kids out on around the block and what not.

    So what do you mean about 120-140mm travel? I don't know what you are referring to.

    I guess I should be looking to get a Trail or XC bike correct?

    I appreciate any feedback.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    Jayem's response is great.



    At the low end, there's a lot of marketing bullshit. MTB enthusiasts aren't buying these bikes, so AM/Trail/XC/whatever, it's mostly what buzz words will resonate with outsiders and newbies.

    At a moderate price point, parts spec and smart design can make an 'inferior' model punch above its weight... but again they're selling to newbies who don't know what's important.

    A dropper post is basically an essential component for a bike that is a competent descender, and a designer can make a better frame if they know it will be paired to a dropper post. But dropper posts are expensive, and newbie budget buyers aren't going to understand that stuff...

    There's a whole market dedicated to predicting the weird purchasing behavior of newbies.
    Thank you for that... that being said should I go for a Trail or XC.. a local bike shop told me to go with the Giant Talon not sure if it was the 2 or 3. Would that be solid enough or would you recommend getting something a little nicer? My budget is $500- maybe $700 depending. I was hoping to maybe get a bike on a deal or end of the year sale or maybe even try and find something used, but I am a little nervous about that. Anyone know of a way to get a deal on a bike? I am cheap and would like to get the best bang for my buck.

    I appreciate your help. I am learning something I never knew or thought to consider.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Foily View Post
    So excuse me for sounding like a newbie. What is the difference between a Trail vs XC?
    Also what is the deal with a dropper post?
    What is AM mean?

    Is there a place on here where I can find what all the lingo means?

    Thank you
    Going to add to this.

    Starting from one extreme and going to the other tne bike categories are as such. Of course every bike has some cross over but generally you want to choose a bike that suits your terrain and interest.

    Road racing bikes (think Tour de France) - gravel (beefed up road bike for crushed granite trails for example) - XC ( 0 to 100mm rear travel, smoother trails, smoother tires, fast efficient bike, like a TdF bike for the dirt) - trail bike (120mm rear travel for typical all around trail riding, more robust) - All Mountain (about 135- 150mm rear travel rough trails both up and down, still needs to pedal decent) - Enduro (150 -165mm travel, just pedal to get up, on the downs where it needs to shred) - DH (heavy, pedals terrible, can seriously take some abuse), Freeride (think Rampage).

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Foily View Post
    Thank you for that... that being said should I go for a Trail or XC.. a local bike shop told me to go with the Giant Talon not sure if it was the 2 or 3. Would that be solid enough or would you recommend getting something a little nicer? My budget is $500- maybe $700 depending. I was hoping to maybe get a bike on a deal or end of the year sale or maybe even try and find something used, but I am a little nervous about that. Anyone know of a way to get a deal on a bike? I am cheap and would like to get the best bang for my buck.

    I appreciate your help. I am learning something I never knew or thought to consider.
    Blargh. I generally try to avoid giving beginner bike buying advice. It's impossible to predict what's important to you, and i haven't bought an entry-level bike in like 20 years.

    If you're interested in progressing your technical skills and such, i'd probably bump up my budget and get one of the 'hardcore hardtails' from chain reaction, like a nukeproof scout. If you're interested in just going out and riding singletrack... the talon seems like a pretty solid package.

    The markup on bikes doesn't really pay for the retail space, so there aren't typically amazing deals to be had. Shops make their money selling service and accessories; a 500-1000$ bike is just a promise that maybe the customer will come back. IMO a 'great deal' is automatically suspect, especially given that (especially mtn) bikes depreciate so quickly once they're not new. Extra bonus that everyone wants the best value 500$ mtb. It's common to see used cheap-ish mtbs with stupidly high asking prices.

    Which is a long way to say... don't worry. Get what you want, and what will fit your interests in the long run. At this price point a bad value is a bike you don't want to ride. If you dig the activity you'll be back shopping again, and your entry-level mtb won't have depreciated hardly at all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    ...a bad value is a bike you don't want to ride.
    Truth. At any price point.
    How do I edit this singature?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Going to add to this.

    Starting from one extreme and going to the other tne bike categories are as such. Of course every bike has some cross over but generally you want to choose a bike that suits your terrain and interest.

    Road racing bikes (think Tour de France) - gravel (beefed up road bike for crushed granite trails for example) - XC ( 0 to 100mm rear travel, smoother trails, smoother tires, fast efficient bike, like a TdF bike for the dirt) - trail bike (120mm rear travel for typical all around trail riding, more robust) - All Mountain (about 135- 150mm rear travel rough trails both up and down, still needs to pedal decent) - Enduro (150 -165mm travel, just pedal to get up, on the downs where it needs to shred) - DH (heavy, pedals terrible, can seriously take some abuse), Freeride (think Rampage).

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

    So what do you mean by 120mm travel?

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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    Blargh. I generally try to avoid giving beginner bike buying advice. It's impossible to predict what's important to you, and i haven't bought an entry-level bike in like 20 years.

    If you're interested in progressing your technical skills and such, i'd probably bump up my budget and get one of the 'hardcore hardtails' from chain reaction, like a nukeproof scout. If you're interested in just going out and riding singletrack... the talon seems like a pretty solid package.

    The markup on bikes doesn't really pay for the retail space, so there aren't typically amazing deals to be had. Shops make their money selling service and accessories; a 500-1000$ bike is just a promise that maybe the customer will come back. IMO a 'great deal' is automatically suspect, especially given that (especially mtn) bikes depreciate so quickly once they're not new. Extra bonus that everyone wants the best value 500$ mtb. It's common to see used cheap-ish mtbs with stupidly high asking prices.

    Which is a long way to say... don't worry. Get what you want, and what will fit your interests in the long run. At this price point a bad value is a bike you don't want to ride. If you dig the activity you'll be back shopping again, and your entry-level mtb won't have depreciated hardly at all.
    Ok that makes sense. I appreciate you saying that. I guess I am not sure what I would want to do since I haven't MTB before. I am guessing single track and working on technical skills sounds like a great idea as well. So what other advice or things would you suggest looking for in a bike that a beginner might not know to look for?

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foily View Post
    So what do you mean by 120mm travel?
    Spend some time in this thread:

    https://forums.mtbr.com/beginners-co...ry-730814.html

    Travel is the distance the suspension allows the wheel to move. So a 120mm fork allows the wheel to move 120mm. It's less obvious on the rear as the wheel usually moves more than the distance the shock compresses as the rear wheel typically rotates around a pivot in order to move. The more travel, the bigger the obstacles you can ride the bike over, or at least smoother, for the most part. But more travel usually means more weight and some loss in the efficiency of your energy being used to propel the bike forward.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foily View Post
    Ok that makes sense. I appreciate you saying that. I guess I am not sure what I would want to do since I haven't MTB before. I am guessing single track and working on technical skills sounds like a great idea as well. So what other advice or things would you suggest looking for in a bike that a beginner might not know to look for?
    You'd be better served by getting to know some cool folks to ride with. They'll know what equipment works in your area, and where to go to get the best MTB experience. Ideally, they'll be serious enough that they have an extra bike(s) that's worth borrowing.

    Once you've adopted the hobby, the people you ride with will dictate your bike to a large degree. It's more fun when everyone is sharing the same experience.






    A 5-700$ bike will be sold in 1-2 years if you adopt the sport, for sure. It's a lifetime investment if you don't. That's not enough money to get an entry-level 'enthusiast' bike, but it's definitely enough to get you rolling reliably. Nothing wrong with that.

    A bike that comes with a stem longer than 90mm is not a mtb. It's a good litmus test- stock stem should be 40-80mm. It might seem like a random thing, but it implies a lot about the intentions of the bike.

    Setting up the cockpit correctly isn't intuitive, yet it's hugely important. But you're not there yet.







    This is a SUPER hard sport to jump in to by yourself, especially if (like me) the technical challenge and adrenaline-thrill is what makes it appealing. Make friends.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Spend some time in this thread:

    https://forums.mtbr.com/beginners-co...ry-730814.html

    Travel is the distance the suspension allows the wheel to move. So a 120mm fork allows the wheel to move 120mm. It's less obvious on the rear as the wheel usually moves more than the distance the shock compresses as the rear wheel typically rotates around a pivot in order to move. The more travel, the bigger the obstacles you can ride the bike over, or at least smoother, for the most part. But more travel usually means more weight and some loss in the efficiency of your energy being used to propel the bike forward.
    Thanks this should be helpful.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    You'd be better served by getting to know some cool folks to ride with. They'll know what equipment works in your area, and where to go to get the best MTB experience. Ideally, they'll be serious enough that they have an extra bike(s) that's worth borrowing.

    Once you've adopted the hobby, the people you ride with will dictate your bike to a large degree. It's more fun when everyone is sharing the same experience.






    A 5-700$ bike will be sold in 1-2 years if you adopt the sport, for sure. It's a lifetime investment if you don't. That's not enough money to get an entry-level 'enthusiast' bike, but it's definitely enough to get you rolling reliably. Nothing wrong with that.

    A bike that comes with a stem longer than 90mm is not a mtb. It's a good litmus test- stock stem should be 40-80mm. It might seem like a random thing, but it implies a lot about the intentions of the bike.

    Setting up the cockpit correctly isn't intuitive, yet it's hugely important. But you're not there yet.







    This is a SUPER hard sport to jump in to by yourself, especially if (like me) the technical challenge and adrenaline-thrill is what makes it appealing. Make friends.
    Yea I am kind of stuck with that budget we are saving for a house and I have a family. Plus not sure how much I will ride so. I hoping to hike a local trail this weekend and chat with some MTB people and will maybe make a connection. I am also hoping someone will let me test a bike out at some point too.

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