Which carbon high riser bar for vibration damping- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Which carbon high riser bar for vibration damping

    I have weak wrists from old skateboarding and snowboarding injuries and so I'm looking for a good carbon high rise (40mm) bar that will provide good vibration damping.

    I'm currently looking at the new enve dh high riser bar High Rise Bar | ENVE Composites and the easton haven high riser bar HAVEN 35 CARBON - HIGH RISE | Easton Cycling. The enve dh bar is 31.8 and the easton haven bar is 35mm.

    If both have were cut to the same length of 740mm, which one would be stiffer and which one would likely have the better vibration damping?

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Vibration damping through foam = snake oil
    Get a carbon bar instead. They really feel different compared to Alu

  4. #4
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    How high of a rise? My wife has a Race face Next riser carbon, it really mutes the trail. You barely feel any rocks through the handlebars, soo much different than an alloy bar.

  5. #5
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    You can do a test yourself, gripping one end of the bar like a hammer, tapping the bars on something hard like a counter-top, striking near the middle of the bar, and feeling which transmits the jolt less. My Easton Haven is less jarring than my RaceFace SixC and Enve DH bar. The SixC feels like metal, honestly. The Enve bar feels like a good balance of stiffness, comfort, and weight. I've ridden the Haven 35 at a Yeti demo, and my Enve bar afterwards, but I can't really come to any conclusion there... I did have far more confidence on the Yetis though, but not sure which part of the bike (likely the front end) deserved most credit for that feeling, likely a sum of everything.

    Steel Calf, please provide proof that "vibration damping through foam = snake oil".

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    You can do a test yourself, gripping one end of the bar like a hammer, tapping the bars on something hard like a counter-top, striking near the middle of the bar, and feeling which transmits the jolt less. My Easton Haven is less jarring than my RaceFace SixC and Enve DH bar. The SixC feels like metal, honestly. The Enve bar feels like a good balance of stiffness, comfort, and weight. I've ridden the Haven 35 at a Yeti demo, and my Enve bar afterwards, but I can't really come to any conclusion there... I did have far more confidence on the Yetis though, but not sure which part of the bike (likely the front end) deserved most credit for that feeling, likely a sum of everything.

    Steel Calf, please provide proof that "vibration damping through foam = snake oil".
    The challenge for me is my local bike store has neither of the bars, or any other bars I would consider for that matter. So I probably have to do a web order which means I don't get to test them beforehand.

    Thanks for the feedback on the bars. You have confirmed what I had read elsewhere that DH bars (SixC, Enve DH and I believe the Havoc as well) are all pretty stiff and may have slightly less vibration dampening than the XC/trail bars (Haven, EC90, Enve Riser and Next). I guess it makes sense for the application, and most DH bikes have forks of 180mm travel or more which I'm sure is taken into consideration in the design of the bar.

    Just out of curiosity, is your Haven bar the 35mm kind?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by legitposter View Post
    How high of a rise? My wife has a Race face Next riser carbon, it really mutes the trail. You barely feel any rocks through the handlebars, soo much different than an alloy bar.
    I'm looking for a riser in the range of 35mm to 45mm. A regular riser (meaning 20mm) is too low. I currently have an alloy EA50 bar with a 20mm rise and my back aches on longer rides. I also have an old alloy EA30 bar with a 40mm rise and its more comfortable on my back.
    I get hand fatigue with both bars though, even with using ODI Rogue grips which are quite padded.

    This is why I'm now considering carbon but the challenge is finding a good 40mm carbon riser bar.
    As far as I can see it's really between the Haven high riser, the Enve DH high riser, the Fatbar Lite Carbon 40mm riser or the Answer ProTAPER Carbon 720 AM riser (although at 50mm the Answer bar might be to high).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by regularbob View Post
    As far as I can see it's really between the Haven high riser, the Enve DH high riser, the Fatbar Lite Carbon 40mm riser or the Answer ProTAPER Carbon 720 AM riser (although at 50mm the Answer bar might be to high).
    Thanks for starting the thread! My wife is looking for a high riser carbon bar due to neck/shoulder issues. We hadn't found the answer yet, but the Answer ProTaper Carbon AM 50 riser is just what she looking for. Just ordered it, so we'll report back when she's logged time with the new setup.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Steel Calf, please provide proof that "vibration damping through foam = snake oil".
    It works. Foam in MX handlebars has been somewhat popular for a while now, and I realize that we aren't sitting on top of a 450cc single revving beyond 10k rpm, but I am sure it will work on a MTB.

    You can DIY but it's a pain in the butt. The foam can easily get everywhere and is extremely hard to remove. That's why I suggested the Spank bars. They've already done it for you.

  10. #10
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    I know these are NOT carbon, but I also know Hi-rise bars are getting more difficult to find..

    I use both of these bars on all my bikes....
    The Deity twenty14 is a 50mm rise...
    deity ::: Twenty14 Handlebar - deity components

    and the Deity CZ38 special is a 38mm rise on my AM bike..
    deity ::: CZ38 Special Signature Handlebar - deity components

    i'd recommend them both ...

  11. #11
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    Enve and Renthal are sure bet. Just check the up and backsweep on those to see which one would fit best. I got a Fatbar carbon (780mm version) lately and the backsweep is less pronounced than on the Easton carbon bars I'm used to. This places you in a bit more "forward" position that can put some stress on your wrists.

  12. #12
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    This Syntace carbon is 35 rise but can be ordered with 12* back sweep. You could get good relief from the added sweep.
    Syntace Vector Carbon High 35

    Don't cut it until you see where the added sweep positions you.

  13. #13
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    Main thing I don't like about Syntace is that they leave little to no room to mount stuff at the center of the bar, especially combined with a Syntace stem. It starts tapering right away beyond the clamp area. I tried to mount things on it anyways, and they just don't grip the tapered section well enough to stay in the position you want them in.

  14. #14
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    +1 on the back sweep of the bars. I had a set of Thomson carbon bars and they didn't have enough
    back sweep. My hands and wrists hurt using them. Got a set of ENVE bars with more sweep and I no
    longer have that pain.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    This Syntace carbon is 35 rise but can be ordered with 12* back sweep. You could get good relief from the added sweep.
    Syntace Vector Carbon High 35

    Don't cut it until you see where the added sweep positions you.
    I have the syntace vector carbon 35 mm rise in 12 backsweep and would not go back if you paid me. Renthal fatbar carbon prior, and gravity light before that. My hands actually fully grip the grips instead of feeling like my thumb/index and outer hand are taking all the brunt. My back loves me for it.

    Try chromag squarewave grips (slight bulge in center) for even more relief on your wrists.

    I have a cannondale jekyll with two dérailleurs, a seat dropper post lever, and the climb/descend remote on my syntace bars with no trouble.


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  16. #16
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    Renthal FatBar Lite Carbon also comes in 740 width with 40 rise. With the high rise you can adjust the fit quite a bit by rolling the bar fore and aft. Love the Carbon feel, been on them over a year now. For AM this year got the DH version at 780 and cut them down to 760, still very happy with the feel and very confident that I'm on some of the toughest bars out there.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Which carbon high riser bar for vibration damping-image.jpg  

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post
    With the high rise you can adjust the fit quite a bit by rolling the bar fore and aft.
    technically this is true, but it's not a good idea to vary much from straight up & down because the sweep back & up on the bars will not be correct.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post
    Renthal FatBar Lite Carbon also comes in 740 width with 40 rise. With the high rise you can adjust the fit quite a bit by rolling the bar fore and aft. Love the Carbon feel, been on them over a year now. For AM this year got the DH version at 780 and cut them down to 760, still very happy with the feel and very confident that I'm on some of the toughest bars out there.
    The Renthal carbon bars are among the smoothest that I've ridden
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  19. #19
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    Certainly a concern more or less depending on the bars. Renthal has designed their bars to have a bigger sweet spot to allow adjusting for personel preference and fit. A feature I like and it allows me to find the perfect fit between stem sizes. If you stay within the markings you can easily roll the bars fore and aft 10-15mm without adversely affecting the grip position. Wouldn't take it to extremes for fit but it helps fine tune things. Don't know how other bars would work trying the same thing.

    "For the geometry, we mirrored our extremely popular Fatbar Lite aluminium bar for both sweep and width and also rise options. The relative position of the first and second bends to each other are critically important to ensure the bar remains fairly neutral when rolled either forward or back in the stem. This is something we had already mastered with our aluminium handlebars."

    -Renthal PR describing developement of the Fatbar Lite Carbon.
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  20. #20
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    It's pretty simple; the rise and sweep of the bar is as expected by the designer when the bar is level while the bike's tires are on level ground. This position depends on the frame and stem used, of course.

    Every degree you rotate it, your rise and sweep is out-of-plane by that same amount. Small amounts won't be felt, but large variation would. If you are trying to shorten reach and rotate the bar backwards, you're also changing sweep *back* into sweep *down*.

    If you're trying to correct 10-15mm of fit, it would be better to do that with the stem. *But* the human body adapts, and people have their preferences.

  21. #21
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    In addition to your other handlebar specs, if your objective it to to get more 'rise' from the bars, have you considered raising the bars higher on the steering tube or perhaps a higher degree stem angle? I understand that we're talking different issues here, but trying to find compromises.
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  22. #22
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    If you look at it from an engineering point of view, start at the source and work your way up. So the trail: are you riding the smoothest line? The tires: could you run wider tires at a lower pressure? I'll dismiss the wheels and call it something you can't easily change. The fork: are you at an optimal setting? Then finally you get to the handle bars. After running rigid, I can definitely advocate for carbon, but it doesn't help that much if the other aforementioned factors are not addressed first. Also, the wider the better as you will get more flex, which will also help with shock and vibrations. Finally grips and gloves. Find the thickest rubber grips you can find. ODI are good. And get gloves with gel passing in the palms.

    Cheers!


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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic-20 View Post
    If you look at it from an engineering point of view, start at the source and work your way up. So the trail: are you riding the smoothest line? The tires: could you run wider tires at a lower pressure? I'll dismiss the wheels and call it something you can't easily change. The fork: are you at an optimal setting? Then finally you get to the handle bars. After running rigid, I can definitely advocate for carbon, but it doesn't help that much if the other aforementioned factors are not addressed first. Also, the wider the better as you will get more flex, which will also help with shock and vibrations. Finally grips and gloves. Find the thickest rubber grips you can find. ODI are good. And get gloves with gel passing in the palms.

    Cheers!


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    Good post until you started talking about fat grips and gel gloves- hard to keep loose hands when you have all that goop to compress, in my experience. Thin/cushioned grips (esi racers edge for me) and unpadded gloves work awesome. YMMV

    OP mentioned back pain, which isn't going to be fixed by flexy handlebars, that's a fit issue. Fancy bars can help with numb hands, but that's it (and good shock/tire/technique will help more with that)

    It's wise to buy bars that are already the length you want; the flex is tuned to the bar width and cutting them down makes them stiffer and buzzier.

    Personally, i use quality aluminum bars, and rotate them forward a fair bit to suit my hands. The carbon ones i've used have been nice, but i can't tell a difference if the rest of the bike is set up properly and has good/tuned suspension. Since proper set up and good suspension is mandatory, carbon bars are unimportant.

    Snake oil is my preferred chain lube, i hadn't thought to put it on my bars, good idea!
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  24. #24
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    I have renthal carbon light and easton haven carbon. The renthals are in 35 rise i believe and are much more compliant then the eastons. I can make them flex by pushing on them, but I do not notice it while riding, only a nice compliant feel.
    I think the biggest change for me was moving away from lock on grips. I always felt the hard plastic under the rubber. I now just glue on regular odi's, longnecks or "O's" using 3m 77 adhesive. Sticks well and comes off easy with alcohol. YMMV. And the tackiness from grip to glove is the best Ive used yet. Also they are only about $11 and have nice fat carbon protecting endplugs.
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  25. #25
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    This thread is old , but I want to share my experience.

    Carbon wise I got the Raceface Sixc 35 and the Sixpack Millenium 35 bars.
    The Sixc 35 has 25mm of rise and feels really nice. Use it on a trail bike.

    The Millenium has 27mm or so rise and is super stiff.
    I have not found an alloy bar that is this stiff and I really don't like it.
    I use the Millenium on my park bike and I shred lots. Because of that I optimized the whole front for vibration. Tire pressure, fork, grips, gloves and so on.
    Worked great, but the bar is still too much.
    I ditched it for another Sixc bar and hope it will be better.

    I also had a lot of different alloy bars.
    Got a Renthal fatbar on a new bike which was just too ugly to keep it, so no experience on that one.

    On my hardtail I use a cheap chinese Wake stem-bar combo. ( 7$ stem and 12$ bar )
    Belive it or not but that combo is actually great.
    The alloy bar is nice and not harsh or too stiff. It is 780mm wide and has 25mm rise.
    I use that combo for over a year now and around 3000km. No issues at all what ever it is riding on the trails and making few little jumps here and there.
    Great bang for the buck, but I will ditch them soon for smothing with more rise.

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