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  1. #1
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    Bike Park Etiquette

    so I was at the local bike park last weekend, and after crashing hard last fall, I now tend to ride a little more conservatively, and on one run some kid was hanging off of my back wheel for quite a ways down the narrow trail and I was sort of annoyed because I felt like he was pushing me; but he would not give me a "hey on your left" call out. We meet again at the lift, and I experessed my displeasure and told him next time just to give a slower ride some space or give a heads up you want to pass - i am not interested in slowing him down.

    what is the accpeted etiquette here? I was trying to keep as far right as possible - but the kid really annoyed me.

    If it matters I was a blue (intermediate) run - so it is not like I was being a slo-poke on a black/double (expert) black

  2. #2
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    Re: Bike Park Etiquette

    If someone is on my ass, I will l always pull over, I don't need to hear the rider say anything.

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    Just try to find a spot where you can move out of the way as safely as possible - traffic is traffic, and short breathers are always awesome, contrary to what stravatards insist.

    I just look at is securing as much space for myself as possible should I make a mistake; I don't want to collect another rider in a mistake of mine, or get involved if they outbrake themselves or underestimate how timid I'm being.

    If it's a tight narrow trail, then that's the nature of it, and the case where it makes sense for the quicker rider to hang back and make their own gap.

  4. #4
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    I was in the opposite situation at downieville. Called out a few times and dude still wouldn't let me pass. I ended up getting frustrated and pulled over for a few mins to make a gap. i Caught him and his group again but luckily for me the guy in front of their group endo'd allowing some passing room when they pulled over.

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  6. #6
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    I'd say that it depends on what kind of trail you're riding. On a beginner trail there's really no excuse for someone riding that close behind you, anyone with a lot of bike park experience (or common courtesy) knows to give beginners/slower riders ample space.

    On a more advanced/expert trail I'd say there's a certain responsibility for any rider to let a more advanced rider that's close behind pass when it's safe.

    I'm guilty of it as well, sometimes we get caught up in having so much fun that we forget about the safety of others.

  7. #7
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    It's the perfect time of year, Somewhere far away from here.

  8. #8
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    Stick your foot out.
    then yell out. "Ride mountain! Give blood!"

  9. #9
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    I usually take up the last spot because I have a tendency to be slower then some people, especially downhill. So if someone comes up behind me I know that I am going slower then they are and will get out of their way as soon as I can. I always try to yield to others because I want them to out of the way so I don't have to look out for them. And they always appreciate it. Unless she's cute, then I might hang out. You know, I have to be honest; she doesn't even have to be cute. Slim

  10. #10
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    I ride with a really excellent racer with a type-A personality sometimes. If he's out and one or two good riders go past us while we're gabbing, he'll take off after them and stage his own mini-race. He's doing it for fun and the thrill of the chase, but if he pulls that s*** on me (and he doesn't, i'm not worthy quarry) i will pull over and stop, and be annoyed.
    We're all looking for a little different experience with the trail and with each other, and we need to communicate our intentions. If you don't like being followed you should have let him pass, and if he wasn't 'in the hunt' he should have asked to pass. Good on you for talking to him eventually; it's the communication that's important.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Mtn View Post
    We meet again at the lift, and I experessed my displeasure and told him next time just to give a slower ride some space or give a heads up you want to pass - i am not interested in slowing him down.
    I figure it's like being in the car and treat it as such. Stay right so others can get by or I stop.
    Anyone who climbs up my bumper is invited to go past or I'll pull over and make them go by. If I want riding partners I invite them or bring them along.

    ** So what was his response after you stated your point above .... ?
    "Before you criticize, you should walk a mile in their shoes. You'll be a mile away from them and you have their shoes"

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Mtn View Post
    If it matters I was a blue (intermediate) run - so it is not like I was being a slo-poke on a black/double (expert) black
    I'd say he was in the wrong. There is no reason why he couldn't have slowed down or stopped to give you some room. Your riding a intermediate track, you shouldn't have to pull over for faster riders in sections like you described.

    Different story if you are riding a double diamond slowly or there is some good options to pull to the side for the other rider.

    If i catch people I'll polite yell out g'day or hows it going if they are going really slow, or just slow down pull over and let them have an uniterrupted run.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uphill=sad View Post
    I'd say he was in the wrong. There is no reason why he couldn't have slowed down or stopped to give you some room. Your riding a intermediate track, you shouldn't have to pull over for faster riders in sections like you described.
    Uphill, I have to very politely disagree. I think it is just common courtesy to allow a person to pass at any point in time in any ride. There is way too little courtesy in the world already and I don't believe we have to add to it.

    The only time I would not let a person pass is on a short section I want to do cleanly or a short uphill grind. Then at the end say I am sorry for the wait as they passed. I am never to proud to hike a bike if I can't get started again. Slim

  14. #14
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    if you can't find space to pull over, or simply don't want to because you're in a super fun section, then just forget he's back there and ride to the bottom. up to you. then get back on the lift, ride to the top and ride down the mountain again...done.

    sh!t happens. if one of your runs gets messed up, or you mess up one of someone else's its not going to kill anyone. much like life you have to be able to say, "whatever dude" and put the focus back on your own fun and move on.

  15. #15
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    if theyre too close, pull over. but maybe hes kinda a newb and was using you as a speed reference. ive done that before, matching there speed to hit jumps at the right speed, but i try hard not to crowd

    good luck!

  16. #16
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    Ride your ride and hold your line, if the rider behind you wants to pass it's his responsibility to call it. Ride at whatever speed is reasonable & fun for you, and ignore the person who's tailgating you unless he yells "coming through!" or calls a pass, at which point you let him through as soon as it's safe to do so.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimL View Post
    Uphill, I have to very politely disagree. I think it is just common courtesy to allow a person to pass at any point in time in any ride. There is way too little courtesy in the world already and I don't believe we have to add to it.
    I don't mind if you angrily disagree

    Yes coutesy is lacking, but in this case it's the rider tailgating on an intermediate track and not calling out to pass. It costs him nothing other than 20-30 seconds to stop and let the rider in front get far enough away, but I can see that pulling over to let him past is also only going to take the same amount of time, but the rider following gave no indication of this.

    Even slower riders, especially if they are on beginner or intermediate tracks deserve a stop free run down the hill. When I ride with slower friends (on green runs) I ride interference behind and ensure no idiots tailgate or try and blast past them. The people who do this are also the ones that start 10 seconds behind you then expect you to stop your flow for them, I presume to make themselves feel fast?

    I'm not saying it's black and white, but the courtesy is not only with the rider infront to let people past.

  18. #18
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    I would pull over for the faster rider. But then again, if I were the faster rider, and the slower rider didn't show signs of pulling over, I'd stop and wait. I like my space in the bike park.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uphill=sad View Post
    Even slower riders, especially if they are on beginner or intermediate tracks deserve a stop free run down the hill. When I ride with slower friends (on green runs) I ride interference behind and ensure no idiots tailgate or try and blast past them. The people who do this are also the ones that start 10 seconds behind you then expect you to stop your flow for them, I presume to make themselves feel fast?

    I'm not saying it's black and white, but the courtesy is not only with the rider infront to let people past.
    I can't agree more with this. I am usually the slowest but every once in a great while I am not so I have rode interference. It also gives me a chance to work on some skills while I am at it.

    And your right, I don't always pull over. If we are riding Joyride you are just going to have to wait your turn till I get to the bottom. Fully Rigid does a great job at spacing out riders so if it turns into a problem after that I am so sorry.

    And I will admit that one of the reasons I will pull over is I want that person out of the way. I ride by myself a lot because I like to. And holding a rider back just keeps them around longer then I want. so they can just go ahead. Slim

  20. #20
    NWS
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    If you think you're slowing someone down, just pull over at the next wide spot. Waiting for the person you're impeding to point out the obvious just seems like passive-aggressive bulls**t.

    Would you really have pulled to the side if he said "On your left" or were you going to hold out for "On your left, please?"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by NWS View Post
    If you think you're slowing someone down, just pull over at the next wide spot. Waiting for the person you're impeding to point out the obvious just seems like passive-aggressive bulls**t.

    Would you really have pulled to the side if he said "On your left" or were you going to hold out for "On your left, please?"
    I don't ride very aggressive or fast and not much on these type of down hill runs so my comment/question is for clarification;

    It sounds like the DH biker has to concentrate on speed, line and technical obstacles as much on who is behind them, how close, if they may want to pass or predict they are just too timid to call it out ... and if the DH'er won't follow this idea and simply pull over in case they wanted to pass, he/she has passive- aggressive disorder ?
    "Before you criticize, you should walk a mile in their shoes. You'll be a mile away from them and you have their shoes"

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by innovator8 View Post
    If someone is on my ass, I will l always pull over, I don't need to hear the rider say anything.

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk
    I HATE WHEN PEOPLE DO THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!

    PLEASE do not pull over. ALSO - DO NOT let someone behind you intimidate you.

    Motocross, or mountain bike, I LOVE the challenge of trying to catch someone, and see if I can pass. Riding MX, I have so many times I cannot count - come up on someone, after pushing pushing pushing for a few laps, to have them either pull off the track, or slow down and let me pass. I want the challenge of finding a place to pass!

    Ride YOUR SPEED, whatever that may be. Don't let anyone behind you dictate your speed, and keep doing what you are doing. The person may be simply checking to find a place to pass. Riding close is not a "sign" or anything. If there IS a small area to pass, they need to be as close as possible to make it happen.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DethWshBkr View Post
    I HATE WHEN PEOPLE DO THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!

    PLEASE do not pull over. ALSO - DO NOT let someone behind you intimidate you.

    Motocross, or mountain bike, I LOVE the challenge of trying to catch someone, and see if I can pass. Riding MX, I have so many times I cannot count - come up on someone, after pushing pushing pushing for a few laps, to have them either pull off the track, or slow down and let me pass. I want the challenge of finding a place to pass!

    Ride YOUR SPEED, whatever that may be. Don't let anyone behind you dictate your speed, and keep doing what you are doing. The person may be simply checking to find a place to pass. Riding close is not a "sign" or anything. If there IS a small area to pass, they need to be as close as possible to make it happen.
    Maybe I'm not understanding. You are saying your wish to catch up to others trumps their preference to not have other's on their a55 .... ?

    I don't get the hierarchy.
    "Before you criticize, you should walk a mile in their shoes. You'll be a mile away from them and you have their shoes"

  24. #24
    NWS
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    I don't ride very aggressive or fast and not much on these type of down hill runs so my comment/question is for clarification;

    It sounds like the DH biker has to concentrate on speed, line and technical obstacles as much on who is behind them, how close, if they may want to pass or predict they are just too timid to call it out ... and if the DH'er won't follow this idea and simply pull over in case they wanted to pass, he/she has passive- aggressive disorder ?
    First of all, nobody has an obligation to pay attention to the rider behind them. It is polite to do so, but if you would rather focus entirely on the trail ahead of you, then go right ahead.

    But that's not what this thread is about. This thread is about someone who was fully aware of a rider behind him, who got annoyed about it who was perfectly equipped to resolve the problem, but instead chose to do nothing about it, and then complained - twice (once in person, and then again here on the forum).

    Not pulling over is simply passive. And given that nobody asked, there's nothing wrong with that. "Passive-aggressive" is complaining to someone else about a problem that he recognized, knew how to solve, and still chose not to solve himself.

    If uncomfortable, pull over.
    Problem solved!
    Nothing left to be displeased about.

    The follower has no obligation to give the leader permission to pull over. In fact that's such a nonsensical idea that I had to read the preceding sentence three times just to make sure I got it right. Because it looks so ridiculous. Because it is ridiculous.

    It makes no sense whatsoever to get annoyed over not being asked to do something that doesn't require any sort of coordination or teamwork.

    This problem had a very simple, very obvious solution, which the OP chose not to use. Instead, the OP got annoyed about with own reluctance to solve the problem, but expressed his displeasure at someone else.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by NWS View Post
    First of all, nobody has an obligation to pay attention to the rider behind them. It is polite to do so, but if you would rather focus entirely on the trail ahead of you, then go right ahead.

    But that's not what this thread is about. This thread is about someone who was fully aware of a rider behind him, who got annoyed about it who was perfectly equipped to resolve the problem, but instead chose to do nothing about it, and then complained - twice (once in person, and then again here on the forum).

    Not pulling over is simply passive. And given that nobody asked, there's nothing wrong with that. "Passive-aggressive" is complaining to someone else about a problem that he recognized, knew how to solve, and still chose not to solve himself.

    If uncomfortable, pull over.
    Problem solved!
    Nothing left to be displeased about.

    The follower has no obligation to give the leader permission to pull over. In fact that's such a nonsensical idea that I had to read the preceding sentence three times just to make sure I got it right. Because it looks so ridiculous. Because it is ridiculous.

    It makes no sense whatsoever to get annoyed over not being asked to do something that doesn't require any sort of coordination or teamwork.

    This problem had a very simple, very obvious solution, which the OP chose not to use. Instead, the OP got annoyed about with own reluctance to solve the problem, but expressed his displeasure at someone else.
    Okay. The part I read/quoted of your response was taken out of context then and I interpreted as I had responded.

    I found it strange the OP asked/confronted the guy about it but never stated the other guy's response.

    I asked what the guy's response was and didn't see anything posted either.

    Quote Originally Posted by NWS View Post
    First of all, nobody has an obligation to pay attention to the rider behind them. It is polite to do so, but if you would rather focus entirely on the trail ahead of you, then go right ahead.
    This seems like good advice. I do exactly that. My concern is my safety and how I might effect others within my path, my control. If I decide to pull off or continue and they want to b1tch about it here that's fine. If they have the adventurous spirit of DH biking and are too bashful to call out, b1tching may be a big part of biking for them.

    Quote Originally Posted by NWS View Post
    Not pulling over is simply passive. And given that nobody asked, there's nothing wrong with that. "Passive-aggressive" is complaining to someone else about a problem that he recognized, knew how to solve, and still chose not to solve himself.
    I do agree he didn't try to solve it on the trail but the OP is starting out asking about the etiquette so he's really not claiming to know. I thought that was his point. It appears he confronted the guy about it, probably to learn from him what the thought was. We just didn't get the response.

    Quote Originally Posted by NWS View Post
    It makes no sense whatsoever to get annoyed over not being asked to do something that doesn't require any sort of coordination or teamwork.
    I think he got into a situation w/o knowing the 'accepted rules' and asked a genuine question but I do agree he seemed annoyed.

    I do not agree that sharing the trails with others, some at break-neck speeds and various abilities we don't even know of doesn't or shouldn't involve some sort of coordination or teamwork. In fact learning or knowing etiquette would be a big part of that IMO.
    "Before you criticize, you should walk a mile in their shoes. You'll be a mile away from them and you have their shoes"

  26. #26
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    I'm sorry, but I can't stop watching that best freak out vid. Most common sense seems to be if it's safe "on your left" move over. If your on a trail that your in the way of a lot of faster riders use a different trail till you can keep up and not in the way.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    I do not agree that sharing the trails with others, some at break-neck speeds and various abilities we don't even know of doesn't or shouldn't involve some sort of coordination or teamwork. In fact learning or knowing etiquette would be a big part of that IMO.
    I'm not sure who you are disagreeing with. Etiquette is really useful.

    But this specific situation doesn't seem like a matter of etiquette, it's just common sense: if you see an easy way to make yourself more comfortable, do it. The OP was "annoyed" (his word), and knew how to solve that problem, and he consciously chose not to do anything about it.

    Instead he decided that the following rider should read the leading rider's mind, detect angst, and attempt to remedy the leader's problem by asking to pass.

    The OP said that he "expressed" his "displeasure" with the other rider at the lift. That doesn't sound to me like an attempt to learn etiquette. If he really wanted to learn etiquette at that point, he would have politely asked the other rider a question about the etiquette for those circumstances. I don't see any indication that's what happened. But he got curious about it later, which is good.

  28. #28
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    Yeah, it does seem like he made himself a 'victim' of sorts.
    At least the feedback and input here associated with it should provide good info or various perspectives for anyone who's a bit inexperienced on trails like this.

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    "Before you criticize, you should walk a mile in their shoes. You'll be a mile away from them and you have their shoes"

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by NWS View Post
    I'm not sure who you are disagreeing with. Etiquette is really useful.
    Not disagreeing, that was my point....

    Sharing the trails with various abilities, riders at differing velocity and speed differential make the rules or etiquette helpful if not mandatory.
    "Before you criticize, you should walk a mile in their shoes. You'll be a mile away from them and you have their shoes"

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