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  1. #1
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    Upset bad bike purchase?

    Hi everyone,

    I recently ordered a bronson from competitivecyclist.com. After waiting several weeks, I got my bike via mail today. I was disappointed to find that the rear tire was flat and it wouldn't inflate. Upon closer inspection, I found air leaking from the base of the valve and two manufactured holes on the rim. When I called them, they claimed that the shipping process can offset the bead and that I just needed to inflate it until it popped back into place. I took it to my local bike shop where we attempted to inflate it. The owner, a seasoned professional, said that the bead placement was fine. Something else was causing the leak, but he would have to take the tire off and examine it. The wait time for the repair would be 2 weeks due to covid19.

    One other problem was that all the plastic bags that came with the bike were torn up. These are bags that contain all the spare parts etc...

    I'm getting a strong impression that I got an open box product. Considering that I paid 4.6 k for the product, it was difficult to stomach.

    Overall, the whole process left me with such a sick feeling that I'm considering returning the damn thing.

    Anyone have some thoughts?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    bad bike purchase?

    Assuming these are the raceface rims, it sounds like the rim tape may have lifted or isnít air tight by the valve. I would pull the tire and check that the tape is all secure. I had a very similar issue on a wheelset using the raceface rims.

    I also think your mechanic may be trying to play you as a sucker. It really isnít rocket science to figure out where the air is coming from. If it is escaping from the two holes, air is obviously getting into the spoke area and that is only going to happen if the tape isnít air tight.

    Is there enough sealant in the tire? That is what should seal up any leaks in the tape/valve interface.

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  3. #3
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    Disagree on the mechanic playing him. Two weeks in my area is actually a pretty good turn around time for a repair right now.

  4. #4
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    OP sounds exactly like the type of person who should not be buying mail order bikes. No offense meant, but youíre talking about very basic mechanical issues. Ten minutes on YouTube will teach you how to repair a leaking tubeless setup. A baseline of common mechanical knowledge will take you far in this hobby.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    OP sounds exactly like the type of person who should not be buying mail order bikes. No offense meant, but youíre talking about very basic mechanical issues. Ten minutes on YouTube will teach you how to repair a leaking tubeless setup. A baseline of common mechanical knowledge will take you far in this hobby.
    Yes, I would see that as an opportunity to learn new skills.
    They come in handy specially when you run into issues on the trail.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Avid is spelled wrong, there should be an 'O' in there.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    I'm considering returning the damn thing.

    Anyone have some thoughts?
    Because of a flat tire? Really?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    Upon closer inspection, I found air leaking from the base of the valve and two manufactured holes on the rim.
    With a little research, I'm confident you can fix the leak and inflate the tire.
    This really is not a problem that requires a bike mechanic to fix.

    What exactly do you mean by "two manufactured holes on the rim"?

    In the mean time, stick a tube in if you must and ride the bike to make sure everything else works. If you find more problems, or you're not satisfied, send it back. Backcountry/Competitivecyclist is good about returns.

  8. #8
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    Thanks everyone for the replies.

    The two "manufactured holes" are tiny pin holes, purposefully made, between the spokes and rim edge. I imagine they prevent water from getting trapped?

    My mechanic said he couldn't fix it on the spot because all the sealant that had leaked into the spoke area would need to be cleaned.

    Although I have repaired bikes and replaced tires, I have little experience with tubeless tires. I supposed I can repair it myself, but what's the point of buying a new bike if you have to repair it out of the box?

    Also, after watching a number of youtube unboxing videos, it became apparent that my box wasn't the same. For one thing, all the plastic baggies in my box had been ripped open and the frame packing wraps were tattered. On the other hand, others had neat organized bike packets that didn't look like they had been shat on.

    If this was a $200 product, I would bite the bullet and keep it; however, for a $4.6k item I'm not going to do that.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    Overall, the whole process left me with such a sick feeling that I'm considering returning the damn thing.

    Anyone have some thoughts?
    You are being first world delicate.

    Either wait two weeks to get the rear wheel fixed or watch a couple hours of YT videos about setting up a wheel tubeless and fix it yourself. It's a useful skill set to have.
    Safe riding,

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  10. #10
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    This is one of the more pathetic things Iíve read on MTBR.

    Fix your bike yourself. Youíre going to have to have at least a working understanding of tubeless if you want to function out on the trail.


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  11. #11
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    Wow... all over a bike with a flat tire? You might not even need any tools to fix this and can have it done in 30 minutes. Get some rim tape, tire sealant, tire levers, and a pump.
    Don't like it? Don't buy it.

  12. #12
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    I'll play devil's advocate. Return the bike. It's your money, do what makes you happy.
    2020 Turbo Levo SL Expert Carbon

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    ...I'm getting a strong impression that I got an open box product. Considering that I paid 4.6 k for the product, it was difficult to stomach...
    I can't say this is the case with your bike, but the bikes I've gotten from CC were not packaged as you'd receive them from the manufacturer because CC does a large part of the assembly and has to repackage them in different boxes before sending them to the customer. This also means they had to open the parts bags to get the parts they needed to do the assembly.

    Santa Cruz bikes come setup as tubeless, but they don't have sealant installed and as such are not fully tested. If you bought from a bike shop, they would do this final step.
    What, me worry?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TylerVernon View Post
    Disagree on the mechanic playing him. Two weeks in my area is actually a pretty good turn around time for a repair right now.
    I donít doubt that the time frame is reasonable, but all of us figured out the issue almost immediately. He could
    have just said ďcheck the tapeĒ.


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  15. #15
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    Please send the bike back.

    The relief holes on the rims do not prevent it from sealing. You either have a bad tape job, not enough sealant or the valve isnít properly tightened. Or a combination. You could have solved this and been riding in the time it took to post. What was your plan if you had a failure on the trail 10 miles from your car?
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Please send the bike back.

    The relief holes on the rims do not prevent it from sealing. You either have a bad tape job, not enough sealant or the valve isnít properly tightened. Or a combination. You could have solved this and been riding in the time it took to post. What was your plan if you had a failure on the trail 10 miles from your car?
    If you read my post, my issue isn't just with the tire, but I see your point. Thank you

  17. #17
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    Thank you everyone for the advice, I really do appreciate it.

  18. #18
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    I compared my experience to youtube videos of other people opening boxes from the online store I got the bike from...

  19. #19
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    mlx john, I think you nailed it on the head. We are emotional creatures after all. From what you guys are telling me, this is a minor problem that can easily be fixed.

    However, for me it was a combination of a tire problem and receiving a package that looked returned. This combination ruined my new bike high. Had each problem happened separately, I think I would be okay. But now, in my inexperience with this type of bike, I feel like I got a bad deal. And for some damn reason I cant shake that.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    If you read my post, my issue isn't just with the tire, but I see your point. Thank you
    Yeah, I'd be demanding pristine plastic bags. The whole point of buying a new bike is those fresh plastic bags. /s

    But seriously, I've never bought a new bike that didn't need some work. The shock mount on my Tallboy started creaking after a couple rides. I'm going to fix it myself. My wife's brand new carbon Trance 29 wasn't shifting into the highest gear so I spent about 10 minutes fixing that. It's mountain biking if a leaky tire and some plastic bags is enough to make you give up on the bike you're going to have a rough time.

  21. #21
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    Perhaps this a great time to transition to road riding.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  22. #22
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    Answer to OPís thread title: NO.
    Never underestimate an old man with a mountain bike.

  23. #23
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    There are direct to consumer brands that specialize in delivering that glorious unboxing moment. Unboxing a product from well engineered packaging is a legit market strategy. Comp Cyclist is a bit more pragmatic in their approach, doing it simply to standardize their expected level of service among the many various brands of bikes they carry, and minimize the burden left to the customer in assembling the bike. When I ordered from them, they had a mechanic checklist they went through that they included with the bike's paperwork.

    Check to see if the tape hasn't peeled back from the sides and the valve's seal/gasket/grommet thing isn't sliced. Careless pumphead insertion on a valve can cut some valves, especially the kind that seal by plugging the valve hole, which may still have sharp edges. The tire can grab the tape edges and bunch it up, leaving a gap for air to escape.

    The holes on the side of the rims are for draining, such as if you ford a creek and the water enters through the valve stem hole. Don't want that stuff corroding the nipples, working against the tape, or whatever else in there. Water's unlikely to drain back through the valve stem hole and that nut doesn't seal the hole.

    Tubeless tech has been fairly ghetto for some years. I believe it wasn't until around 2014 or so that tires themselves started to become more standardized for tubeless compatibility. Even then, people were skeptical about benefits and against proprietary patented systems, especially those that were heavier, so we're still in the age of using thin lightweight tape to seal rims. Even I thought that my "ghetto" setup worked alright and reluctantly paid extra/full-price for the "Tubeless-Ready" tires, shopping non-TR tires until TR stuff starting going on sale and non-TR got mostly phased out. I experimented with off-brand sealant and alternative tape too, to try and save a buck, but discovered that Stan's did their homework and their product quality shows, and haven't really bothered with anything else. Just trivia to help you understand why people accept such quality as the standard.

    Just do what the bike shop guy would've done, if you can't wait 2 weeks for service. You'll need supplies for bike maintenance upkeep anyways, especially if you're riding it off-road. Expecting perfection just cause you paid a lot for a lightweight high performance machine is kind of unrealistic. People hotrod these things oftentimes since they're rarely satisfied. Though, oftentimes people claim to rather have one high end machine than two machines at half the price.
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Perhaps this a great time to transition to road riding.
    I was going to suggest a real sport like golf or knitting.
    :nono: :thumbsup:

  25. #25
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    Wow.

    All the bikes in the bike shop are "open box". Most of them even have some miles on them from being test ridden, including the very expensive ones. Even if you special order a brand new one, they open them up.

    You've got a bad tape job. Most new bikes have a bad tape job. Your bike isnt in any way defective or broken, its just a new bike. New bikes need adjustments. I basically count on fully retaping new wheels since the factory jobs are often so wonky.

  26. #26
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    Starwave, for a bit of reassurance... when a newbee drops a lot of cash on a product (bike in this case) it can definitely set you up for potentially unreasonable expectations for whatís in the box. As long as the parts are not damaged, thereís no dirt from off road riding, all is well.

    In response to some posts about you being a perfect example of someone who shouldnít be buying a bike online, I completely agree. But reality is that you canít find bikes in most shops right now so it is what it is.

    Iíll pile onto what others have told you. Take a deep breath and be happy with the reality of your purchase - you bought a bada$$ bike. This is a great opportunity to understand tubeless tire setup.

    The holes in the rim youíre talking about, theyíre normal.

    Buy some rim tape from your bike shop and some tire sealant. If they donít have any in stock, order some on amazon so you get it quickly.

    Learn how to setup a tubeless tire - itís a requirement if youíre going to ride tubeless since If you slash a sidewall on the trail you will need to pull the valve and put in a tube. Itís a ton of fun with fresh sealant mixed with dirt

    Chalk this up to a learning experience. The situation is forcing you to get familiar with necessary bike maintenance skills.

  27. #27
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    You paid for the bike you'll enjoy riding for a long time.
    The 'new' part of boxes and plastic bags are nothing compared to the riding.
    Retape the wheel and ride it for a week.
    Then come back- give us an update.
    I'm betting no plastic bags will make the final review.

  28. #28
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    Congrats on your new bike Starwave. The Bronson is bad ass and my friends who ride them love them.

    It sounds like youíve got good advice on here about the wheel issue. I use YouTube all the time for all my bike repairs; itís an amazing resource. The new tape is a good idea, as is using a tube if you canít get the tubeless set up right away, to fix you up.

    It also sounds like youíve got a decent shop near you too, which will be excellent down the road as you wear that bike out from riding it.

    I hope you can put your mind at ease and get out on the trails. A couple fun rides will hopefully help get rid of those nagging thoughts.

    Cheers


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  29. #29
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    I purchase my Marin Rift Zone in March and have spent more than half of that time waiting for parts to be replaced under warranty. The seat and fork were replaced under warranty and Iím currently waiting for the cassette to be replaced under warranty. Somewhere in there I tossed the tubes, replaced the cranks, bb, grips, stem, bars, rear brake lever and tires because they I preferred other components than those that came stock. I donít consider it a bad bike purchase.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    OP sounds exactly like the type of person who should not be buying mail order bikes. No offense meant, but youíre talking about very basic mechanical issues. Ten minutes on YouTube will teach you how to repair a leaking tubeless setup. A baseline of common mechanical knowledge will take you far in this hobby.
    Yep, if you donít have these basic mechanical skills, you buy from your LBS to get the basic services that you canít do yourself. Iím guessing a lot of us around here were changing a flat when were were 7.

  31. #31
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    hmm... I think it is worth considering why everyone thinks it "ok" / "normal" for a brand new ~$5K bicycle to faulty tape job / other adjustments needed...


    If I bought a brand new motorcycle for $5k (which I could do~) and it had a f*cking flat tire... it would be an "issue" ...




    the bike industry needs to up it's game... the LBS near me is a joke for service... I have to work on my own bike or take my bike to one of my friends who is a race mechanic if it is something I don't wanna do...

    OP... suite yourself... it is a lot of money to spend and not feel great about it.... it is minor stuff... but if it has put you off... it has?

    it is pretty easy to fix the tape and get this sort of thing sorted however.

  32. #32
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    A two week backlog on repairs is about what you are going to face during the height of the season even without other compounding issues.

    If you bought the bike from the LBS, you may have had a two hour turn around but you didn't so you don't.
    Last edited by Rev Bubba; 07-12-2020 at 11:39 AM. Reason: The ususal - The best things are not written, they are rewritten. GBS

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by atarione View Post
    hmm... I think it is worth considering why everyone thinks it "ok" / "normal" for a brand new ~$5K bicycle to faulty tape job / other adjustments needed...


    If I bought a brand new motorcycle for $5k (which I could do~) and it had a f*cking flat tire... it would be an "issue" ...




    the bike industry needs to up it's game... the LBS near me is a joke for service... I have to work on my own bike or take my bike to one of my friends who is a race mechanic if it is something I don't wanna do...

    OP... suite yourself... it is a lot of money to spend and not feel great about it.... it is minor stuff... but if it has put you off... it has?

    it is pretty easy to fix the tape and get this sort of thing sorted however.
    Rode motocross most of my life and now mountain bikes. How much harder is it to remove a mountain bike tire from a rim than a motorcycle tire from a rim? What about keeping a motorcycle up to remove the wheel?
    Don't like it? Don't buy it.

  34. #34
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    Ok, I'm going to work on the tire and aim to keep the bike. But if I find one more problem with it, it's going back

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TylerVernon View Post
    Disagree on the mechanic playing him. Two weeks in my area is actually a pretty good turn around time for a repair right now.
    Build a good relationship with your shops, I like mom and pop bike shops. I call ahead say I am coming to town (2 hour drive) to shop and my bike is doing this, I drop it off go shopping come back and pick it up few hours later. The little shop in my town either helps me right away or next day unless they don't have parts for what I need. I go between the two depending what is wrong. I have never found that kind of service in the big bike stores.

  36. #36
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    Quick question. I'm assuming I have to clean the old sealant out before reapplying the tape. Would it suffice to wipe it out or should I wash it out with water?

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    Quick question. I'm assuming I have to clean the old sealant out before reapplying the tape. Would it suffice to wipe it out or should I wash it out with water?
    Two things. If the sealant got into the cavity of the rim where the nipples go, you may want to flush that out. You may not be able to reuse the tape if sealant got underneath it.

    I would have fresh tape on hand just in case. Pull the tire, save as much sealant as you can, clean the tape and inspect it, if you find issues pull the old tape, clean the rim bed, and then tape up with the fresh stuff. To ensure a good seal, throw a tube in after you put down new tape and pump it up to apply even pressure to the tape.


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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by atarione View Post
    hmm... I think it is worth considering why everyone thinks it "ok" / "normal" for a brand new ~$5K bicycle to faulty tape job / other adjustments needed...


    If I bought a brand new motorcycle for $5k (which I could do~) and it had a f*cking flat tire... it would be an "issue" ...




    the bike industry needs to up it's game... the LBS near me is a joke for service... I have to work on my own bike or take my bike to one of my friends who is a race mechanic if it is something I don't wanna do...

    OP... suite yourself... it is a lot of money to spend and not feel great about it.... it is minor stuff... but if it has put you off... it has?

    it is pretty easy to fix the tape and get this sort of thing sorted however.
    Well if you knew anything, you would no that bikes usually arenít shipped with sealant in them and a tire being flat isnít out of the norm. The LBS you purchased from adds sealant and then you hit the trail. Oh wait, the LBS the OP purchased this from is States away and thatís why the LBS he went to for help didnít take the 15 minutes for something the OP should do himself. Did you learn anything from my lesson, which is buy from your LBS if you are not mechanically inclined.

  39. #39
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    The base of the valve had a gash in it. Also noticed a puncture in the tape. Will replace both

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    Ok, I'm going to work on the tire and aim to keep the bike. But if I find one more problem with it, it's going back
    Doggone it!

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by atarione View Post
    hmm... I think it is worth considering why everyone thinks it "ok" / "normal" for a brand new ~$5K bicycle to faulty tape job / other adjustments needed...


    If I bought a brand new motorcycle for $5k (which I could do~) and it had a f*cking flat tire... it would be an "issue" ...
    Mainly experience. Regardless of how we think things ought to be, a new bike is typically going to need some sort of minor adjustment at the very least. I always expect that there will be a couple little kinks that need to be worked out of the bike after I get it. You could send the bike back but retaping the rim is less work.

    Secondly, buying a high end mountain bike is more like buying a racecar than a Toyota Camry or street motorcycle. I have the same bike that some factory EWS racers ride. For the most part, I can spec it with the same components. Sometimes I see bike checks and feel sorry for the riders being limited by having to use some meh component a sponsor makes. Mountain bikes are typically made for performance, they are not utilitarian vehicles. Why is it ok that my bike suspension needs to be serviced a couple times a year but my car can go many years? Why do I have to clean my bike drivetrain after every ride but not on my car?

  42. #42
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    Thinking about it, I'd probably politely ask CC to reimburse the cost of new tape and valve. Take a couple pics of the area to show the issue.

    Heck, they may just ship them out if OP's willing to do the work. It'd get him riding fast and likely diminish that sour taste in his mouth.
    :nono: :thumbsup:

  43. #43
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    I agree with others in this thread. If you can't handle a little but of rim taping then dont buy an online bike.

    When you buy online you receive a generous discount to offset the inconvenience of an online purchase.

    That inconvenience is bike set up, lack of local support and warrantee claim delays. If you dont want the inconvenience then pay extra and buy local.

    Or learn basic bike assembly and maintenance skills and perform those tasks yourself and dont be shocked when there are delays regarding set up and warrantee claims. You have to take those delays on the chin because you enjoyed a sizable discount to not support local. '

    Now consider the local shop. They will not have an urgency to repair your bike that you purchased from an opposition company that undercuts their margins. They can see that you have spent $4k + elsewhere. They will (and rightly so) give priority to their loyal customers first. This is another disadvantage of not buying local.

    My question to you is this. How much did you save by not buying local?

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    OP sounds exactly like the type of person who should not be buying mail order bikes. No offense meant, but youíre talking about very basic mechanical issues. Ten minutes on YouTube will teach you how to repair a leaking tubeless setup. A baseline of common mechanical knowledge will take you far in this hobby.
    Agreed.
    Less isn't MOAR

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ripbird View Post
    Well if you knew anything, you would no that bikes usually arenít shipped with sealant in them and a tire being flat isnít out of the norm. The LBS you purchased from adds sealant and then you hit the trail. Oh wait, the LBS the OP purchased this from is States away and thatís why the LBS he went to for help didnít take the 15 minutes for something the OP should do himself. Did you learn anything from my lesson, which is buy from your LBS if you are not mechanically inclined.
    honestly... I was a bit off on a rant.. the, LBS here is hot garbage for service if you bought the bike there or not....

    I use to have Schwalbe tires that didn't like my rims at all and simply couldn't be seated without an air compressor.. that I don't have.... So it took it in.... they mounted my tire backwards... a few months later the tire got a thorn and lost pressure and managed to lose the seal at the rim.. Took it back to the bike shop as I couldn't get the stupid thing to seat again... they mounted it backwards again... (it was on the rim the right direction when I took it to them). they also messed up the shifting and lost a part that had been on the bike in the process...

    whatever... in general I don't think as many things as seem to be, should be wrong on bikes that costs as much as these things do....

    I had however forgot that he got the bike from CC however.. it does sound like they "tried" to set it up tubeless and cocked it up, before they shipped him the bike however?


    Whatever... I got maxxis tires now (which always seat with a floor pump) and a mechanics tool set / acquiring more tools as needed. working on my own bike now.... I won't let that LBS near me touch my bike again.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post
    I agree with others in this thread. If you can't handle a little but of rim taping then dont buy an online bike.

    When you buy online you receive a generous discount to offset the inconvenience of an online purchase.

    That inconvenience is bike set up, lack of local support and warrantee claim delays. If you dont want the inconvenience then pay extra and buy local.

    Or learn basic bike assembly and maintenance skills and perform those tasks yourself and dont be shocked when there are delays regarding set up and warrantee claims. You have to take those delays on the chin because you enjoyed a sizable discount to not support local. '

    Now consider the local shop. They will not have an urgency to repair your bike that you purchased from an opposition company that undercuts their margins. They can see that you have spent $4k + elsewhere. They will (and rightly so) give priority to their loyal customers first. This is another disadvantage of not buying local.

    My question to you is this. How much did you save by not buying local?
    I always buy bikes from the store; however, due to the pandemic, the usual context of life has changed. No bike shop here or within a 100 mile radius had the specific bike I wanted; consequently, I explored online options. To answer your question, I received NO discount buying online, I paid full sales tax, and a paid an additional $100.00 in shipping. In addition I had to wait several weeks to get the bike. The prices for the bikes seem to be set, at what's listed on Santa Cruz, regardless of where you buy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Thinking about it, I'd probably politely ask CC to reimburse the cost of new tape and valve. Take a couple pics of the area to show the issue.

    Heck, they may just ship them out if OP's willing to do the work. It'd get him riding fast and likely diminish that sour taste in his mouth.
    Agree with this. I'd be surprised if they didn't at minimum give you a credit or something.

  48. #48
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    I bought a a direct to consumer bike from Fezzari. The only thing I did was buy pedals. I did have to eventually fine tune the rear derailleur. After that IÔŅĹm at over 200 miles on trails and I do need to bleed my front brake. Wow. My tires were set up with tubes. They would do it for 65.00 bucks. I did it for half.

    IÔŅĹd be pissed too if I paid for double the price of my bike with more issues. I have my own bow shop because of archery ÔŅĹtechsÔŅĹ arenÔŅĹt techs. I have a lot to learn on tuning bikes but itÔŅĹs worth the effort, tools, and time.

  49. #49
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    These issues are not uncommon with online bike purchases. As others have said, these are fairly basic mechanical issues. You can fix them yourself. If you don't want to deal with this sort of thing, buy from a good local bike store. You save money online for sure but also lose out on service.

    I have purchased from competitive cycles and generally had a good experience, but there were a few mechanical issues I needed to correct on my own, including brake problems. They took care of me and sent me a free bleed kit, but I had to do the work myself. That's how I prefer it anyway. Lots of bike mechanics out there are kluges.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by austink26 View Post

    It really isnít rocket science to figure out where the air is coming from. If it is escaping from the two holes, air is obviously getting into the spoke area and that is only going to happen if the tape isnít air tight.

    Is there enough sealant in the tire? That is what should seal up any leaks in the tape/valve interface.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Air leaking from the valve is most definitely a rim tape issue and no amount of sealant will fix that.

    Pull the tire and check the tape. It's probably wrinkled somewhere, requiring that you pull the tape, clean the rim with alcohol let it dry completely, re-tape and re-mount. Should work fine.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbikeloco View Post
    Air leaking from the valve is most definitely a rim tape issue and no amount of sealant will fix that.

    Pull the tire and check the tape. It's probably wrinkled somewhere, requiring that you pull the tape, clean the rim with alcohol let it dry completely, re-tape and re-mount. Should work fine.
    He already found the problem, apparently.

    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    The base of the valve had a gash in it. Also noticed a puncture in the tape. Will replace both

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    I always buy bikes from the store; however, due to the pandemic, the usual context of life has changed. No bike shop here or within a 100 mile radius had the specific bike I wanted; consequently, I explored online options. To answer your question, I received NO discount buying online, I paid full sales tax, and a paid an additional $100.00 in shipping. In addition I had to wait several weeks to get the bike. The prices for the bikes seem to be set, at what's listed on Santa Cruz, regardless of where you buy.
    The reference posted regarding discounts for bikes when buying online is really for "consumer direct" brands... i.e. brands that ONLY sell directly to consumers via mail order. Like Canyon, Whyte, YT, etc. They are "discounted" because they cut out the middle man. And as such, do not sell through traditional LBS's. You typically don't pay tax (if the distributor is in a different state), and just about all consumer directs don't charge for shipping. You mentioned buying a Santa Cruz. They aren't consumer direct, and anything online will not undercut what they cost at an LBS. So yeah, you paid full MSRP.

    Any way...

    Like many have said... the issue isn't worth returning it. Learn to fix it because tubeless requires maintenance. Or... put a tube in it and call it a day. Bottom line, enjoy the new bike!
    You didn't quit riding because you're old, you're old because you quit riding.

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    Something you may not know about that will cheer you up if you purchased the bike at full retail price from Back Country / Competitive Cyclist - they have a Gear Junkie program that is free to join and gives you 10% of your purchase price to spend during the active quarter. So that'd give you around $460 in credit to apply towards any other purchases. I was pleasantly surprised after I ordered my Santa Cruz from them.

  54. #54
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    Stick a tube in it.
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  55. #55
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    +1. Before I read your post I was thinking this is something I would expect to read on a roadbike forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Perhaps this a great time to transition to road riding.

  56. #56
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    Everything has been pretty much covered.

    Except for the opened plastic bags (unless I missed it). That too is normal. Competitive receives the various parts, OEM or swapped out, and opens them and assembles the bike mostly for you. They put the open packaging with spare parts, instructions etc. into the box for you, but yes they opened them for assembly.

    I'm not sure if Competitive installed the rim tape for you or if it was from the manufacturer. If they did the tape install, I'd let them know about the tape and the valve stem, and maybe ask for some $ back, or some tape to replace what should have been working.

  57. #57
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    I heard 29ers hold air better because the tires have a larger volume. Maybe you shoulda gotta Hightower...j/k. A little soap, h20, and a toothbrush woulda help you find your leak right away. Maybe call the company and see if you can get a replacement or at least a discount for your time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nativeson View Post
    I heard 29ers hold air better because the tires have a larger volume. Maybe you shoulda gotta Hightower...j/k. A little soap, h20, and a toothbrush woulda help you find your leak right away. Maybe call the company and see if you can get a replacement or at least a discount for your time.
    I've recently had a tire go flat when sitting in the garage between rides for no apparent reason and the water soap trick showed nothing. A quick un bead and re seat solved that issue.

    Also OP, sometimes the valve core inside the stem gets sealant build up and it doesn't seat all the way causing a micro air leak. Get yourself an extra bag of 10 valve cores for this purpose. They are a .50 part that will leave your tire flat when sitting in the garage. This is the first thing I change if I have an air leak or flat. Also loosing 1-2 pounds of air when your bike is sitting is normal, so don't freak out. I add air before every ride.

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    not sure if it was one or both causing the leak. I'm not convinced that the problem occurred during shipping. The valve was well protected in the box and I very gently removed the tire so the hole was not caused by me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bad bike purchase?-011c9603c7fb30d4e44cfa81b6a51500082e4c7b24.jpg  

    bad bike purchase?-01f95ad658d4f2392ef0dc15827f4492f3d4ae8de8.jpg  


  60. #60
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    Alright, you're making progress! I can understand your frustration but once you get it sorted and out on the trail, that'll all be gone and you'll be loving your new bike.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

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    So I bought sealant, core remover, air shot, and tape. I removed the tape. The videos on youtube say that all adhesive must be off the rim before retaping. Well, there was lots of adhesive. It would take me hours to take it off.
    I work 60 hour weeks and I don't have time to do this currently. I just want to ride the damn bike. I called competitive cyclist, they were very understanding and said I can return it for a full refund.

    I'm going to throw in the towel on this one.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    So I bought sealant, core remover, air shot, and tape. I removed the tape. The videos on youtube say that all adhesive must be off the rim before retaping. Well, there was lots of adhesive. It would take me hours to take it off.
    I work 60 hour weeks and I don't have time to do this currently. I just want to ride the damn bike. I called competitive cyclist, they were very understanding and said I can return it for a full refund.

    I'm going to throw in the towel on this one.
    You can just throw in a tube and ride it for now and set it up tubeless when you have the time.
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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    So I bought sealant, core remover, air shot, and tape. I removed the tape. The videos on youtube say that all adhesive must be off the rim before retaping. Well, there was lots of adhesive. It would take me hours to take it off.
    I work 60 hour weeks and I don't have time to do this currently. I just want to ride the damn bike. I called competitive cyclist, they were very understanding and said I can return it for a full refund.

    I'm going to throw in the towel on this one.
    Sorry to hear it didnít work out starwave. Itís frustrating, especially when you donít have time to work on it and just want to ride. Good luck with the return and with finding the next new ride.


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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by acmcdonaldgp View Post
    Sorry to hear it didnít work out starwave. Itís frustrating, especially when you donít have time to work on it and just want to ride. Good luck with the return and with finding the next new ride.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I logged in just to type a similar message to OP.

    Starwave - Best of luck. Totally understand all the excitement and enthusiasm for new (expensive) bike and riding, then to have those miscues.

    I hope you have lots of awesome rides on your next bike right from the start.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    OP sounds exactly like the type of person who should not be buying mail order bikes. No offense meant, but youíre talking about very basic mechanical issues. Ten minutes on YouTube will teach you how to repair a leaking tubeless setup. A baseline of common mechanical knowledge will take you far in this hobby.
    This. So many people buying bikes these days that should heed the advice of the shops.
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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    You can just throw in a tube and ride it for now and set it up tubeless when you have the time.
    This.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Avid is spelled wrong, there should be an 'O' in there.

  67. #67
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    Maybe l missed it, but how is the rest of the bike?
    any marks? tyres new? etc....

    Sorry to hear your new bike buzz ended up disappointing, that sucks
    always mad and usually drunk......

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by starwave View Post
    Well, there was lots of adhesive. It would take me hours to take it off.
    Nope, more like 5 minutes with some rubbing alcohol, or goo gone, or basically any alcohol based cleaner.
    The whole tubeless thing would take 25-30 minutes tops. Dealing with the refund, sending the bike back, and getting a new bike will take more time. How do you know that the new bike you get won't have any issues?

  69. #69
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    I dont get it either. It will cost you more money and more time to send the bike back. Chuck an inner tube in and ride. Its a fantastic bike. Then when the bike shop has a faster turn around get it in for re-taping and gooing.

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    thanks again guys.

  71. #71
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    Does that mean it's tee time?
    :nono: :thumbsup:

  72. #72
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    Talk about first world problems.

  73. #73
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    I am shocked at the number of responses that occurred before someone suggested to just put a tube in it.........

  74. #74
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    That's the exact tubeless setup that I deemed ghetto, with the thin tape to seal the rim's drill holes and a tubeless valve sealing against the sharp edges of the valve hole being susceptible to damage.

    True UST (no drill holes), Bontrager TLR (rigid molded rim strip), and even Specialized 2Bliss (thick non-adhesive polymer rim strip, or individual plastic plugs for each drill hole) are more sophisticated designs. Their valves seal against the material surrounding the valve hole.

    That rim tape looked like it was damaged by a tire lever, which I bet was the source of the leak. The valve gasket thing can get damaged by just a little mishandling, but I would bet it could still seal in that shape.

    I hate the adhesive tape method. I personally would've just tried to patch that spot up, perhaps by just cutting out that section and laying down fresh tape to cover up the drilling. Sometimes I do two layers of tape around the entire rim, since I've had more than one occasion where a spoke breaking on me ended up puncturing the tape.

    There's sealant for tubes that claim to last the life of the tube, like from Muc-Off, if you must have the healing properties.

    People seemingly bought into tubeless to gain more rolling speed and traction due to having a more supple tire, and perhaps save weight (if it's not negated by sealant and a tire insert).

    ----

    See attached image below for an example of a valve that lost its sealing ability, resulting from someone tightening it more because they believe that's where the leaking usually happens.

    Also attached an image of a Mavic brand UST valve for reference. Mavic also makes sealed rim beds without drillings, which weren't mass production friendly.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bad bike purchase?-4400427db3b7156b815dd3be79669e2828556350-1.jpg  

    bad bike purchase?-s-l600.jpg  

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  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    I am shocked at the number of responses that occurred before someone suggested to just put a tube in it.........
    People apparently really believe it's impossible to ride a bike with tubes.
    LOL!
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  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    I am shocked at the number of responses that occurred before someone suggested to just put a tube in it.........
    Iím more shocked that all of us stupids took the bait when the OP had his mind made up prior to starting this thread.

  77. #77
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    The world is full of diverse folks. Just something I come to expect from reality. I prefer to perceive it as interesting, with few exceptions.

    I would've just ignored them if they were some toxic person who ranted and preached, trying to take a bullying approach to get others to agree with their point of view. I would've neg repped if they responded with name-calling or some other kind shamefully immature kind of spite. Seen worse kinds of throwing a fit... well, lots of other ways to spend that much money, and they probably weren't passionate enough about experiencing enthusiast levels of mtb progression to find it worth it in this case.

    Didn't even look like there was sealant in it, judging by how clean the inside of that rim is. Tubeless ready tires tend to come with the disclaimer that they're not air tight, and are designed to be used with sealant. The valve was supposedly not installed by Comp Cyclist, so the damage to the rim tape by tire lever could've been caused by the OP. Hard to resist arguing semantics, defining "being gentle" as removing/installing the tire entirely by hand (and floor pump).

    I suppose from a sellers PoV, this should be a lesson to make their process more army-proof. Being former military, I love little extra touches like printing tips on the actual part itself, like when I go to operate machinery, there's a giant info plate that gives detailed step-by-step instructions. In the bike world, things like max torque, what tool is needed (e.g. 8mm hex), and other bits of info are mega convenient (seat post diameter), without needing to go deep into manuals or measuring bores and other dimensions yourself. I know a lot of people don't even bother reading manuals, but I'm one to prefer trying out the expert's recommended way, before trying to do things my own way.
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  78. #78
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    did OP buy another bike?

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by woopsIdidthat View Post
    did OP buy another bike?
    Not sure, but my Tallboy 4 C/S purchased from CC in June came immaculately packaged, without damage (shipped to FL), neatly organized documents/spare parts, and with sealant in the tires.

    In other words, totally different from the OPís experience. I get where people here are coming from, but he spent near $5k on a bike and the issues he had shouldnít be his to work out.

    If ANY of the SC dealers I visited had what I wanted in stock, or could have given me some kind of idea when one was available, I wouldnít have been pushed to purchase from an online vendor.

    My CC rep told me that as an authorized SC dealer, they must fully set up the bike, and test it, before they minimally disassemble it and package for shipping. My box was a CC box, not a SC box. Mine was set up perfectly, and a snap to assemble (handlebars and wheels) when it arrived. I also received a 10% discount. Overall, Iíd say my experience with CC was very good, and I would buy from them again under the same circumstances (supply shortages due to COVID).


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