AM FS for heavier rider?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    AM FS for heavier rider?

    Been riding with am hardtail so far but I would like to try full suspension next. The new norco sight seemed like a spot on with geo and parts, but apparently the rear suspension doesnít work with havier riders.

    I weight around 240lbs. Is there any fs am bikes that can handle my weight in bike park, enduro type and regular trail riding. What kind of things I should look up for. Apparently low leverage ratio would be better for hevier riders? Looking for a bike with 140-160 rear travel and 160 front and 29Ē wheels. Some bikes I have been thinking along with the sight are, pole evolink 140, bird aeris am9, transition sentinel, mondraker foxy, yt jeffsy. These because interesting geo. Any ideas or experience what would be best for hevier rider, or other bikes.. or shoud I just keep riding hardtails, at least they can handle my weight.

    Oh and my budget is aroun 3000Ä and I ride in Finland if that matters.

  2. #2
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    Leverage ratios are going to be somewhat important, yes. But also, look for something that has a Fox shock on it, and since you will be relying on more aggressive damping from the shock (a result of running higher air pressures) get one that's piggyback as well (DPX2 for instance). Regardless of what you decide on bike wise, you will almost certainly benefit from sending your shock to be custom tuned for you as a heavier rider. As for actual bike recommendations, I personally pay so little attention to bikes in this category, I don't know of that many, and the only one that comes to mind I suspect will be over your budget, but it might be worth looking at the SC Megatower.

  3. #3
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    Cotharyus i was under the impression RS shocks tend to take higher pressures than fox.....so for a given suspension system the RockShox should hold the larger rider wight better.

    however i personally dont think any of the air shocks are going to work all that well without a heap of volume spacers any way(i am heavier than the OP) i filled the RS monarch on my 2016 Reign(notorious bike for shocks) and its just enough......i so! want a coil shock.

    Note to sambolo Norco limit just about all the bikes to 120kg's(265lbs) and it has to do with the components being not as strong as the frame ....the weight rating is rated by the weakest component

  4. #4
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    What I have understood is that for example the fox X2 bottoms out quite easily, and norco ride alligned succest foxís maximun pressure(300 psi) for me. With the superdeluxe the pressure was way less, and if I can remember right the RS can also handle more than 300psi. Also, I have understood that coil fits to heavy people in very rare situations and bikes and that you would have to use spring so firm you cant use most of the travel, or that it is hard to even find spring that firm.

    Oh and Im sure that norcoís are made to last, since they make frame more durable in bigger sizes and they weight a ton My curret bike is also norco fluid ht and its holding fine, even when I have ride bike park with it. Thats one of the reasons I would like to have another norco plus the geo looks so good with the slack head and low steep seat tube. Pole evolink would be pretty close with the geo, just more expensive, better leverage ratio thought.

  5. #5
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    Focus your search on bikes known to be stiff and burly. A 150lb rider vs a 250lb rider will notice different amounts of flex in a bike.

    Guerrilla Gravity, Knolly, Transition are all known for being smashers. Iím sure thereís many more options so might be good to ask around in the clydesdale forum.

  6. #6
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    Yeah kinda askin what fs bikes other heavy riders are riding so I would get the hang of it what might be burly. All thought it seems like the burly structure doesnít mean that the suspension can handle heavy loads. Reviews dosenít talk about it ether, quess there isnít that much heavy riders because cycling is so healty I also have poor ooportunities to test drive bikes, since all the shops in finland seems to sell mainly trek bikes and I dont want one Been also thinking about the ibis ripmo af, even thought it goes a bit over budget and looks ugly imo. Transition sentinel would be available, but I have heard that the bearings wont last, or is it just the carbon version? I dont want to maintance the bike all the time, I want to ride, the bike should be overall sturdy without being a DH bike.

  7. #7
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    The V2 RAAW Madonna looks interesting. RAAW gives you the choice of rocker links based on your weight and several shock options, or without a shock. Downside, it'll blow your budget.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMISSIONARY View Post
    Cotharyus i was under the impression RS shocks tend to take higher pressures than fox.....so for a given suspension system the RockShox should hold the larger rider wight better....
    In a given frame, the required air pressure depends on the effective area of the air piston. A shock with smaller effective area will need a higher pressure for the same weight rider. Basically, air pressure will be proportional to the weight of the rider for any given shock.
    What, me worry?

  9. #9
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    Could the rockshox MegNeg air can help with heavy riders? It makes the negative air chamber bigger and shock more progressive. And there should be still small bump sensitivity.

  10. #10
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    My understanding of the MegNeg is that it lets you increase negative pressure, to retain/increase sensitivity in the initial portion of travel. This also means that you need more pressure in the main chamber.

    It should increase progressiveness, which is usually desired for heavier riders.

    It just means that you may get close to the maximum pressure of the shock though. So thatís something to consider. But as long as youíre not exceeding max pressure, Iíd bet that would be a good option.

    Also, look at Kona bikes. My process 153 is a really beefy bike, itís the al build, and I think it weighs close to 36lbs. Iím usually about 200lb riding weight, and havenít noticed any flex. Commercial/pro reviews also noted its stiffness. Commencal bikes also appear similarly overbuilt.

  11. #11
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    I've been around 230-235 lbs since I started mountain biking almost 8 years ago, so I have experience on what works/doesn't work for me. Not all FS are alike, and even FS bikes from the same manufacturer will ride differently so best bet is to try to test ride/demo as many bikes as you can. I personally like mid travel support and progressivity so I'm not bobbing like crazy while pedaling or blowing through the travel at the smallest bump in the trail. I've found Rockshox suspension to work well overall for us heftier riders. I've had a number of Fox shocks and only the X2/DHX2 is the one I've truly liked. Cane creek shocks also have enough adjustability to handle riders at the heavier side of the spectrum.

  12. #12
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    I would look heavy at a Guerilla Gravity Smash. Modern geo with a suspension that has a decent leverage ratio for heavy riders. Transition, Moondraker and Kona are a little more linear.

  13. #13
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    260 lbs. Currently on a SC Tallboy4. I have a buddy who's 6'6" and weighs upwards of 330lbs+ who has been riding a 2012 Tallboy for years without issue. I ride King hubs. The Tallboy has SC Reserve wheels with 30mm rims.

    I would considered Santa Cruzin your search; especially considering their lifetime warranty.

  14. #14
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    Take any Enduro bike with Coil shock, modern Enduro bikes will handle any abuse you throw at them, i.e. Giant Reign SX 29 will have no problem serving you, if factory spring is too soft you just change it to harder one.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbfree View Post
    Take any Enduro bike with Coil shock, modern Enduro bikes will handle any abuse you throw at them, i.e. Giant Reign SX 29 will have no problem serving you, if factory spring is too soft you just change it to harder one.
    At 240 pounds, the additional weight of something like adding in a coil would be negligible and might be what you need. Have you looked through posts on the Clydesdales/Tall Riders forum? There might be some good info there.

  16. #16
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    A word of caution on coil shocks, the spring rates available may not be stiff enough for how you want your bike to feel. The coil rates are based on rider weight along with amount of travel and stroke length.

  17. #17
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    Iím now asking from Pole what shock they recomend for evolink 140 to heavy riders. Also interested about hightower, but it seems to be unavailable. At least Santa Cruz has setup guides up to 280lbs or so on.

  18. #18
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    I am 235-240 and currently riding a Sentinel. I have bottomed out 2 times I think..... never felt it. I really like the bike but the shock setup has been the hardest out of anything I have ever owned. It isn't bad it is just not quite as plush as I would like.

    I strongly considered the Process 153 and think I should have given the 2020 Specialized Enduro a chance. Can't beat the deal I got on the Sentinel though (they are currently on sale 20% off). And it is still a super fun bike that is plenty capable.
    2019 Transition Sentinel
    2019 Trek Remedy
    2014 Trek Remedy 8 29er
    2011 Trek Scratch Air 8
    2011 Reign 2
    2008 p.2

  19. #19
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    Looking for a bike that is coil capable may be a good idea... but not just because it might have a coil.

    A bike designed for a coil is usually both a heavier duty bike ("enduro"/Freeride/DH type bikes) with stronger frame/components as well as has a higher amount of progression in the suspension linkage design.

    This is because coil springs don't naturally have an increasing spring rate like an air shock does, so they have to design it into the suspension design itself.

    And as we mentioned before, higher amounts of progression are useful for heavier riders, so as to not bottom out off of every jump/drop/etc. You may have to change coils though, if you actually get a coil shock. In fact, I'd count on it, most bike stuff isn't designed for ~200lb + riders from the factory.

    I'll put in another plug for the Kona Process 153 29'er. When they were released they specifically made mention that they built it to the same durability standard as their DH bikes, which should imply the frame is durable. They also are very stiff bikes (some bikes flex a lot under heavier riders).

    The downside is weight. My AL version weighs 35-36lbs. That doesn't bother me, but it does bother some.

    As I said, I'm ~200lbs, and ride moderately aggressively (still progressing, my largest drops have been in the 3-5ft range), and have had no problems.

    Two of my riding buddies are 200+lbs as well (one has been ~240lb, the other is ~215lb). One of them is on a Kona Process 153 (27.5 model, carbon), and the other is on a Commencal Meta AM 29 (another heavy, overbuilt ~36lb bike). No complaints from either of them.

  20. #20
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    Iím sure burly bikes hold better, but it just feels little strange that if I want to ride FS bike on same trails and bike parks where I now use a trail hardtail (which is holding fine, wheels could be sronger), that the FS bike should be some how DH ready to hold up. Also doing about 3-5ft drops, not on to flat thought. Okay the goal is to ride more harder and bigger when I get better at riding and there are some things now I dont ride because I feel pitty for my hardtail and that was the reason Iím looking for FS now.

    I think Im going to have to go with one bike strategy, so it would be nice that the bike that can handle weight and abuse, would be also pedal efficient. Sometimes I ride to work for example. Im aware that most likely some compromises are have to be done. Ideal bike would have steep seat angle, slack head angle, roomy cockpit, 29er and 140-160 suspension.

  21. #21
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    Hardtail bikes are inherently pretty stiff, so flexing isn't really a problem for any non race-specific cross country hardtail (the insanely light weight ones). Full suspension bikes are different. They have pivots, bearings, etc, and have to flex in the middle. This means it is much easier for a full suspension bike to be "flexy", and not in the "good" ways. Particularly if the rider is heavier/faster.

    Its not a huge problem, but it is worth mentioning that some full suspension bikes are known to have enough flex, that people can feel the bike "hinging" in the middle (left/right) while cornering. Others have enough that the rear tires hit the inside of the chainstay/seatstay areas of the bike, some even leaving rubber marks/scraping off the paint.

    You don't necessarily need a DH level bike. But the longer travel bikes like you're looking at are usually ridden more on trails with larger features, and occasionally taken to the bike parks, and some prioritize frame strength/stiffness more than others, thats all I'm saying.

    I think finding a one bike solution that is comfortable at the bike park, and commuting, seems pretty hard to do (depending on your commute distance).

    Most modern full suspension bikes pedal pretty efficiently. Back in the day, they used to bounce/bob around, wasting tons of energy. Now they've figured out how to design the suspension so that your pedaling force firms up the suspension. I don't mind climbing any more on my Kona than I did on my hardtail before it. And unless the climb is really long, I don't bother to lockout my rear shock.

    If you have space for it, and really do want to commute, I'd actually get a separate hardtail/commuter bike if possible. Mostly because riding on the road with a good set of trail tires is tiring (and expensive, as it wears them super fast). Also, not sure where you store the bike at work, but the idea of leaving my nice bike chained to a stopsign/bike rack while I'm in work... isn't a good one. Id rather have a cheap bike setup exactly for that purpose (again, if possible).

    Or if you must use the full suspension bike to commute, get a cheap wheelset for it,and run street tires on the second set. That way its less tiring to ride to work/back, and also you don't wear out your more expensive trail tires too quickly.

    There are lots of good bikes out there, and I'm sure you'll be happy with whatever you get.

    Good luck on the search .

  22. #22
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    The space is the main problem, Iím currently keeping my bike on a block apartments small balcony. Distance to work is around 9km each way, but I like it because I can ride in the woods also. Storing the bike at work also concerns me, I might have to keep my old HT for commuting and just find a place for it at home.

    The stifness of the bike is no doubt an important thing, and I dont really care much about the weight of the bike. I think some of the bikes Iíve been looking are considered to be stiff, like the yt jeffsy(at least the carbon I think), pole evolink, sentinel.. I have to check out the kona proces 153 also, Kona bikes only have a poor quality-price ratio what comes to building kits. I think most new bikes are pedal efficient because of the steep seat angle.

    I really appreciate all the information I have got from here. Great forum!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sambolo View Post
    The space is the main problem, Iím currently keeping my bike on a block apartments small balcony. Distance to work is around 9km each way, but I like it because I can ride in the woods also. Storing the bike at work also concerns me, I might have to keep my old HT for commuting and just find a place for it at home.

    The stifness of the bike is no doubt an important thing, and I dont really care much about the weight of the bike. I think some of the bikes Iíve been looking are considered to be stiff, like the yt jeffsy(at least the carbon I think), pole evolink, sentinel.. I have to check out the kona proces 153 also, Kona bikes only have a poor quality-price ratio what comes to building kits. I think most new bikes are pedal efficient because of the steep seat angle.

    I really appreciate all the information I have got from here. Great forum!
    I understand the small space thing, so I get your struggle. I cycled to work for 5 years, and the bike had to be stored indoors, since the two we locked up outside were stolen (even right outside my window).

    The stiffness isn't a giant priority, just something to be aware of, as we're both on the heavier end of normal riders.

    I agree on the weak value of Kona bikes, at least most of the year. They tend to do large clearance events (I got mine for 30% off) early on in the year, but its not set in stone. You may get lucky if you look around.

    The steep seat tubes do help climbing, but mostly by getting your weight forward enough to counteract the sag of the rear suspension on steep climbs (basically, its more like a normal pedaling position on flat ground, as on a mountain bike much of the time you're pedaling up). But the suspension design also plays a part.

    All the bikes you listed are great. You may want to look at the Ibis Ripmo AF as well. Its a super strong value at the moment.

    Also just wanted to point out that the Jeffsey and Sentinel aren't really super similar (if that matters to you). The Jeffsey is an allrounder trail bike. The Sentinel is much more downhill performance focused (even though it only has 140mm rear travel, and still pedals fine).

  24. #24
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    Make sure you get a good strong set of wheels, 32 spoke minimum, stay away from 28 spokes. Wheels are usually the most flexy thing on the bike and a weak set of wheels will make even the stiffest frame feel squirmy, not very many bikes come stock with "strong" wheels.

  25. #25
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    Not a smart thing to take your new FS for commuting, it will go sloooow and you will ruin your soft knobby tires much faster than on terrain.
    Keep old HT for commuting and around town.
    At your weight don't look at Trail bikes, look at Enduro class if you will progress, they are not much slower on uphills and will forgive you much more when you case the double. Giant i mentioned has one of best price/perofmance ratios :-)

  26. #26
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    Iím now pretty sure that Iím going for a Pole evolink with a cane creek db coil. Just cant decide 140 or 158 evolink. The 140 with 160 fork sounds spot on and 158 a bit too much for flat trail riding . The Pole customer service said thought that the 158 is as pedal efficient as the 140. The 158 builds are with 180mm fork and that feels way too much. Ether way I would go for a frame only option, so I could use shorter fork, just dont know if its good for the geo. I still might also change my mind and buy another complete bike if some good offer shows up.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by sambolo View Post
    Iím now pretty sure that Iím going for a Pole evolink with a cane creek db coil. Just cant decide 140 or 158 evolink. The 140 with 160 fork sounds spot on and 158 a bit too much for flat trail riding . The Pole customer service said thought that the 158 is as pedal efficient as the 140. The 158 builds are with 180mm fork and that feels way too much. Ether way I would go for a frame only option, so I could use shorter fork, just dont know if its good for the geo. I still might also change my mind and buy another complete bike if some good offer shows up.
    You mentioned you have 3000 EUR budget and you go for boutique brand where only frame with shock will cost you 2100 EUR. Either you mislead us with budget you have or you didn't think that through, because you are not getting fork, drivetrain, wheelset and other stuff for 900EUR....

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbfree View Post
    You mentioned you have 3000 EUR budget and you go for boutique brand where only frame with shock will cost you 2100 EUR. Either you mislead us with budget you have or you didn't think that through, because you are not getting fork, drivetrain, wheelset and other stuff for 900EUR....
    Iím planing to use some of my ht parts and upgrade later, or maybe even sell the ht. The budget might be a bit more, and there are good deals on parts every now and then. Fork around 300e(Yari), drivetrain the same(nx), and wheels around same also(dt h1900), all burly and good enought for me. But yeah, getting pole will make me do compromises, but it is the bike I have kinda always wanted and I would like to support local brand.

  29. #29
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    Im 285-290 currently and ride a 2018 Intense Recluse. I've got a Fox DHX RC4 coil on the rear (650lb spring) and run a Manitou Mattoc on the front set at 150mm of travel. Bike works wonderfully!

  30. #30
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    I was about 284 when I got my Trek Fuel EX7. I am now at 231. I really like that bike and it has held up well to my weight.

  31. #31
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    Iím going to get a pole evolink 158 for a test drive, for the next whole weekend. Let see how that feels.

  32. #32
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    I'm somewhere around 245 wide weight, and my china carbon frame is yet to break anything other than an alloy bolt. Yes, you can easily ride full suspension at your weight. Id have a hard time believing that any brand name frame would have trouble with 240 lbs. Go with what you like. I dont think you're limited to super-strong brands.

    I will also recomment manitou suspension as well. Riding a magnum fork and mcleod shock, and its been flawless. Zero bob, plenty of mid support, plush small bump compliance, everything you could want in suspension, and it works well with heavier riders.

  33. #33
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    3 days of testing the evolink 158 and it feels great! Had it with monarch air shock and around 270psi gave me 30% sag. Felt very plush, no bottom outs, but still got to use the full travel. The bike pedals better than my hardtail, especially uphill and super stable in jumps and downhill. Guess this is going to be my next bike.

  34. #34
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    Look for a 160mm+ enduro bike. That will be built stronger.

    Avoid light weight frames. I personally havent seen any failed santa cruz frames. So they would be a good start to look at. I have had 2 SC bikes and riden them brutally to no failures (im 170pd though). I wouldnt advice rocky mountain (which i currently ride) thet are built way too light for a heavy dude.

    From a strength standpoint VPP frames rear triangles are stronger due to traingulation compared to 4 bar linkage bikes.

    Also if you ride hard you will break stuff. Be prepared for buying and upgrading bits as required. The reality is that most components are not designed for your weight.

  35. #35
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    Oh, Consider a 27.5. 29er wheels are weaker with more flex.

  36. #36
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    Any bike that Pole Bicycle manufacturers are the way to go for you.

    Learn Frame Geometry basics and sizing.

    https://bikeinsights.com/
    2019 Commencal AM 29 Ride

  37. #37
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    Yeah, I ordered the Pole evolink 158 with airshock last week. There was a decent offer so I bought the complete bike instead of frame only. Also sold my old hardtail thought Dont think I would have use it much anyway.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by matadorCE View Post
    I've been around 230-235 lbs since I started mountain biking almost 8 years ago, so I have experience on what works/doesn't work for me. Not all FS are alike, and even FS bikes from the same manufacturer will ride differently so best bet is to try to test ride/demo as many bikes as you can. ......
    This is what I would say, the geometry is so different. Some bikes I feel like I'm working against it so much the full suspension isn't worth it. If you are a cruncher- its worse by a long shot.

    ....I'm 240 and tall...but also old now so I don't ride as aggressively as I used to. I've blown out a fox RS on my full suspension bike. I went to a hardtail and don't miss the FS much.

    __
    "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face,"
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  39. #39
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    Hereís what I got. Evolink 158. Love it

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