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  1. #1
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    All Mountain - Good climber advice

    Hey Guys,

    Looking for some advice on buying a new bike.

    I am looking for an all mountain bike, with some solid climbing, great descent, strong construction, carbon frame and great value for the price.

    Here are a few of my contenders :

    -Santa Cruz - Bronson
    -Ibis Mojo HD
    -Intense 275
    -Yeti SB-66

    Leaning towards the Bronson for its great ascent and great specs but very opened to suggestions. I am also not a pro racer, but looking into taking up the sport. I am a runner and climber but its been some time I rode a bike. Looking however for something that will last me years to come so my skills can level up with the bike.

    Looking for under 4 k, any recommendations on where to buy, price matching, crazy deals or waiting for Black Friday I am all ears !

    Also looking to buy online, so some brands like Specialized and Trek are out.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Can't give actual experience as I haven't ridden of any of the new 27.5" wheeled bikes, but DW link bikes have a reputation for being great climbers (and my 5spot certainly is) so maybe add the Turner Burner to your list. The basic TR build comes in at $3499, which would give you a little cash left over for any upgrades you want.

  3. #3
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    Bronson Carbon S. What's the delima?

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    Thanks guys!

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    You need to add the Devinci Troy to the list. Great value, carbon (lifetime), great platform....
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  6. #6
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    Intense 275 are VERY similar in linkage, geometry, etc - almost the same bike. So look for value between the two.
    Second, you might want to try 5010 as well. Slightly shorter travel than Bronson BUT lower bottom bracket (and corners better - I've ridden both) and climbs a little better. If you think you'll be more into technical and freeride riding than stick with the Bronson between these two.
    Also may I ask - why online? Buying local does have an advantage (besides supporting your local bike shop) that you have someone to turn to for minor adjustments, give you preferred warranty treatment (sometime knock off shipping charges, etc). It's worth considering, even if it costs a little extra.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by t824601 View Post
    Hey Guys,

    Looking for some advice on buying a new bike.

    I am looking for an all mountain bike, with some solid climbing, great descent, strong construction, carbon frame and great value for the price.

    Here are a few of my contenders :

    -Santa Cruz - Bronson
    -Ibis Mojo HD
    -Intense 275
    -Yeti SB-66

    Looking for under 4 k, any recommendations on where to buy, price matching, crazy deals or waiting for Black Friday I am all ears !
    Under $4k, carbon frame and a boutique brand? That is going to be VERY tough even with a very basic build kit. Intense T275 carbon frame alone is $3200?

    You may want to consider the aluminum versions of these bikes. For example, the Tracer 275 Foundation build gives you the same Intense VPP goodness with a decent spec for under $4k.

    Food for thought is all

  8. #8
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    FSR bikes are the best climbing. If you know how to pedal smoothly.

  9. #9
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    id get the Bronson. SC makes some of the best bikes period, and the threaded bottom bracket means no creaking/squeaking sounds you have to deal with

  10. #10
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    I am a runner and climber but its been some time I rode a bike.
    Unless you are prepared to break bones, stick to road riding. Mountain biking is not a good fit with climbing. Hands/fingers are easily broken while mtb'ing.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Unless you are prepared to break bones, stick to road riding. Mountain biking is not a good fit with climbing. Hands/fingers are easily broken while mtb'ing.

    I think that's an exaggeration. Been MTBing since 87 and never broke a bone. I think the most common broken bone riding is the collar bone. It is certainly no reason not to ride. Get some instruction if you can and don't be stupid.
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  12. #12
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    All Mountain - Good climber advice

    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Unless you are prepared to break bones, stick to road riding. Mountain biking is not a good fit with climbing. Hands/fingers are easily broken while mtb'ing.
    I'd argue that riding on the road can be as, if not more dangerous than the MTB. Higher speeds, traffic, etc.


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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by t824601 View Post
    Hey Guys,

    Looking for some advice on buying a new bike.

    I am looking for an all mountain bike, with some solid climbing, great descent, strong construction, carbon frame and great value for the price.

    Here are a few of my contenders :

    -Santa Cruz - Bronson
    -Ibis Mojo HD
    -Intense 275
    -Yeti SB-66

    Leaning towards the Bronson for its great ascent and great specs but very opened to suggestions. I am also not a pro racer, but looking into taking up the sport. I am a runner and climber but its been some time I rode a bike. Looking however for something that will last me years to come so my skills can level up with the bike.
    Your list has bikes spanning a considerable difference in design philosophy.

    I know most about the Mojo HD and the Yeti SB-66 and they are nothing alike and that starts with the fit/geometry of the bikes. The Yeti is long and low. The HD is short and relatively high at the bottom bracket. You won't achieve the same fit between those two bikes without trying out a size larger Mojo than the equivalent Yeti - alternative compromises might be to run a longer stem length on the Mojo.

    Which one works for you is personal preference. What works for you taking up the sport may need some adjustment as you get into it more and more.

    Out of your list, as an ex-SB66 owner, I would probably take the Bronson. My GF rides a Mojo HD and she loves it but not beyond recognising the geometry is what it is.

  14. #14
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    Thanks all around, some great advice! Will definitely add the Devinci Troy to the list, but definitely leaning towards the Bronson. There are a few places that sell them for 3600$ and with some luck that can even go down with a sale or even a floor or demo bike!

    How is Santa Cruz's customer service? Do they offer crash insurance, seen something to that effect on an online shop but wasn't sure if it was offered by the manufacturer or the shop.

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    Any tips on sizing for 6'2" 33 inseam? I guess it depends a lot on the bike, so anyone in that height have a Bronson, Turner Burner or Devinci Troy?

  16. #16
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    Troy Sizing

    [QUOTE=t824601;11397257]Any tips on sizing for 6'2" 33 inseam? I guess it depends a lot on the bike, so anyone in that height have a Bronson, Turner Burner or Devinci Troy?[/QUOTE

    I'm 6'2" and my XL Troy fits perfectly with a 50mm stem. Carbon XP build under 4k with a lot of what it sounds like you are looking for. Available online- however mine was ordered by my LBS from Chicoutimi on Monday, delivered to Central Vermont on Wednesday and built the next day. Try to ride one and check it out.

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    [QUOTE=angelo;11397290]
    Quote Originally Posted by t824601 View Post

    I'm 6'2" and my XL Troy fits perfectly with a 50mm stem. Carbon XP build under 4k with a lot of what it sounds like you are looking for. Available online- however mine was ordered by my LBS from Chicoutimi on Monday, delivered to Central Vermont on Wednesday and built the next day. Try to ride one and check it out.

    Thanks for the tips! Seems like XL is the way to go, how does it handle in that size?

  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=t824601;11397325]
    Quote Originally Posted by angelo View Post


    Thanks for the tips! Seems like XL is the way to go, how does it handle in that size?
    Very nicely. Good for extended climbs without compromise on tighter trails.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by t824601 View Post
    ...How is Santa Cruz's customer service? Do they offer crash insurance, seen something to that effect on an online shop but wasn't sure if it was offered by the manufacturer or the shop.
    I've owned 3 Santa Cruz bikes. Customer service is top notch! Bike frames are warrantied for 5 years to the original owner. They also offer a discounted crash replacement for anything that's your fault. Bearings are warrantied for life.

    I've also had a few minor issues (seals) and I've called them direct and had it sorted in minutes.
    The cake is a lie.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kubikeman View Post
    I've owned 3 Santa Cruz bikes. Customer service is top notch! Bike frames are warrantied for 5 years to the original owner. They also offer a discounted crash replacement for anything that's your fault. Bearings are warrantied for life.

    I've also had a few minor issues (seals) and I've called them direct and had it sorted in minutes.
    Thanks for the info man, seems like a solid company!

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  23. #23
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    Turner Burner

    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    Can't give actual experience as I haven't ridden of any of the new 27.5" wheeled bikes, but DW link bikes have a reputation for being great climbers (and my 5spot certainly is) so maybe add the Turner Burner to your list. The basic TR build comes in at $3499, which would give you a little cash left over for any upgrades you want.
    Giving a closer look at the Turner Burner, bike definitely looks sweet and the reviews love it! Do you know what are the difference between the different builds, in particular the RT vs XT. Any of the upgrades must haves? Kashima shocks or Dropper upgrade?

    Also, where is the best place to buy one? Could only see the builds available from the manufacturer directly (Turner Burner - Turner Bikes).

    Thanks!

  24. #24
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    I'm not sure on the exact differences between the builds but all the specs are on the website. I think it a pretty big jump in price from the TR to the next level up though.

    As for the upgrades, I'd be reluctant to comment without knowing how/what you ride. Best bet is to wait til you've done a few rides on the bike to see if there's anything in particular you're not happy with. I don't have a dropper as most of my riding is long-ish forestry road climbs with the seat up, then technical singletrack descents with the seat well down, but others swear by them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    I'm not sure on the exact differences between the builds but all the specs are on the website. I think it a pretty big jump in price from the TR to the next level up though.

    As for the upgrades, I'd be reluctant to comment without knowing how/what you ride. Best bet is to wait til you've done a few rides on the bike to see if there's anything in particular you're not happy with. I don't have a dropper as most of my riding is long-ish forestry road climbs with the seat up, then technical singletrack descents with the seat well down, but others swear by them.
    Thanks for the honest comments, this seriously helps!! Have a great day man!

  26. #26
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    Did some digging, seems the Santa Cruz Bronson has the best bang for the buck.
    3599$ w Carbon frame

    Bronson Carbon 27.5 R AM Kit Complete Mountain Bike (100144523)

    Loved the Turner but the frame is not Carbon and the price is almost the same to the Bronson. Anything better for that kind of money?

  27. #27
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    Don't know if it matters to you, but the Turner frame is
    100% hand built in the USA.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    Don't know if it matters to you, but the Turner frame is
    100% hand built in the USA.
    It is, this has become a harder decision that what I thought. The Santa Cruz is also using their cheaper carbon mostly likely made in China. In the end how much does it matter aluminium vs carbon? The extra care of properly welded Aluminium made here in the US vs second class carbon? Any riders have some opinions?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by t824601 View Post
    It is, this has become a harder decision that what I thought. The Santa Cruz is also using their cheaper carbon mostly likely made in China. In the end how much does it matter aluminium vs carbon? The extra care of properly welded Aluminium made here in the US vs second class carbon? Any riders have some opinions?
    The carbon model isn't second class per se. It's a different modulus, so in order to achieve the same strength as the higher end carbon C models, you need to use more carbon int he layups. That means it's a heavier frame. It's cheaper to produce, but it sort of negates the major benefit of lighter weight. I don't recall what the weight difference is between the two.

    Quote from Santa Cruz.

    “We’re well aware that bikes have been going up in price the last few years,” says Santa Cruz’s Joe Graney. “So we made it a priority to get the radness of our carbon technology to ‘trickle down’ within reach of more riders. Working with our exclusive manufacturing partner, we used the same proprietary processes to create lower cost carbon frames that retained the same legendary strength and stiffness Santa Cruz are known for. We achieved this by using a different grade of carbon material that results in a minimal weight gain of approximately 250-280 grams (0.6 lbs).”
    The cake is a lie.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by t824601 View Post
    It is, this has become a harder decision that what I thought. The Santa Cruz is also using their cheaper carbon mostly likely made in China. In the end how much does it matter aluminium vs carbon? The extra care of properly welded Aluminium made here in the US vs second class carbon? Any riders have some opinions?
    I don't know of a carbon bike NOT made in China. And look or quality. Aluminum bikes made at SAPA for example, where not as good as people thought...
    It is the Right of the People to Alter or to Abolish It.

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    Re: All Mountain - Good climber advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    I don't know of a carbon bike NOT made in China.
    Indeed. You know how China had been building all our stuff for the past 25 years? They have been getting better at it all that time while the us had stagnated (talking mass production here). A us made carbon frame would cost 5x as much and likely be heavier and less uniform. That's not to say China doesn't also make crap but if it's about supporting our economy just buy a us brand from your lbs. The profit that goes to manufacturing is only a tiny percent of the sale price.

    Back on topic... will carbon make you a better climber? It's lighter and stiffer than al so in theory that's less mass to move up the hill with a platform that is better for the suspension to do it's thing. Would you notice? Maybe not but if you can afford it every little bit helps

  32. #32
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    I've ridden the Bronson C and I currently own a 2009 turner 5 Spot and can confidently state that I loved the Bronson. The bronson was a demo from SC so it was outfitted with all the pretty and lightweight bits, but holy cow did it go up a hill. It felt much much lighter than my Turner, and I don't remember any other time I've giggled going up a hill due to how easy it was.

    All that being said, at ~$3500, I would probably go Bronson over the Burner. I've owned three Turners and loved them all, but the idea of lighter bike with that kind of climbing prowess is really appealing. Bronson is also fun as all get out going down a hill too.

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    In the end how much does it matter aluminium vs carbon? The extra care of properly welded Aluminium made here in the US vs second class carbon?
    XL Aluminum Santa Cruz Blur LT2 here. The rear triangle has broken twice at the welds. Pictures here:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/santa-cruz/bl...rm-880686.html

    And I've broken each of the carbon links.

    Santa Cruz Warranty: Above and beyond anything I would ever have expected. The warranty is now 5 years. Comparing warranties is definitely something you should do. A longer warranty is worth a lot of money.

    My aluminum Blur now sports a carbon rear triangle and aluminum links, and I'm right at the time period where my aluminum rear triangle would fail; so far so good.

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    Definitely some strong arguments for carbon, thanks!. That said, anyone rides a Cannondale Jekyll? Heard some good stuff about its ability to climb and then go downhill like a champ.

    Price might be above 4k, but starting to reconsider that budget now with so many choices!

    Also, anyone has any experience buying show bikes? Any places around Denver or Online sites?

    Here are some cannondale heavely discounted that look sweet... but its in Utah...

    Show, Demo, and Used Bike Inventory | Infinite Cycles Bike Shop

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    Do they come with full warranties? If not, forget it.

    Another bike you should be considering: Pivot Mach 6. It's the latest 27.5 super bike. Personally, I would choose a Mach 6 over a Bronson because I don't like the geometry of SC's new bikes. A 73 degree seat angle is pretty steep, which means it puts a lot of weight on your hands, which can lead to hand numbness and shoulder pain. Steep angles are great if you are climbing, but if you are riding flat terrain, I think they are terrible.

    If you want steep angles while you are climbing, another option is to buy a bike with a slacker seat tube angle, like a Mach 6, get a Talas fork and drop the fork down.

  36. #36
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    I don't think bikes like the Bronson and Mach 6 are ment for flat terrain. Sure they pedal well but there are much better bikes for that kind of riding. I have a Turner 5 Spot with a 73 degree STA and the saddle quite forward on a straight post and it doesn't put undue pressure on my hands. That would depend on your body measurements, stem, bars and stack height as well. I think people are going to fit better on one geometry than another. My bike isn't set up for pedaling on the flats but it does pretty well. It shines at descending but will still claw it's way up a steep pitch.
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Do they come with full warranties? If not, forget it.

    Another bike you should be considering: Pivot Mach 6. It's the latest 27.5 super bike. Personally, I would choose a Mach 6 over a Bronson because I don't like the geometry of SC's new bikes. A 73 degree seat angle is pretty steep, which means it puts a lot of weight on your hands, which can lead to hand numbness and shoulder pain. Steep angles are great if you are climbing, but if you are riding flat terrain, I think they are terrible.

    If you want steep angles while you are climbing, another option is to buy a bike with a slacker seat tube angle, like a Mach 6, get a Talas fork and drop the fork down.
    Thanks, the mach 6 definitely looks like a sweet bike, looks like another top contender! Thanks!!

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    Mach 6 Pivots are pretty expensive, but super good, they're just selling out at any bike shop they sit in. i am getting the new trek slash cause its super aggressive on the down hill but not all carbon fiber and hella expensive like the Nomad.

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    I am now thinking going with the SB-66. Prices are pretty amazing now that the new 275 platform is out, so 26 are getting some crazy discounts. Plus that bike has been getting awards left and right and can get a tricked out SB-66 at about 5k and just under 26 pounds.

  40. #40
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    All Mountain - Good climber advice

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasF View Post
    Mach 6 Pivots are pretty expensive, but super good, they're just selling out at any bike shop they sit in. i am getting the new trek slash cause its super aggressive on the down hill but not all carbon fiber and hella expensive like the Nomad.
    You won't win any races climbing with the mach 6 but its not going to let you down either. And yes it pretty expensive just like any other high end carbon bikes. I just cruise on the way up with my mach 6 and let it loose on the dh.


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    Quote Originally Posted by t824601 View Post
    I am now thinking going with the SB-66. Prices are pretty amazing now that the new 275 platform is out, so 26 are getting some crazy discounts. Plus that bike has been getting awards left and right and can get a tricked out SB-66 at about 5k and just under 26 pounds.
    Get it. My husband has an SB-66 and adores that bike. Climbs like a dream and descends like a better dream.

    With the 27.5 craze, there are insanely good deals out there. I picked up a Mojo HD full XT build, Fox 36 up front, the works, for $3K. The hubby's 66 was about the same (XT build, just under 26ib). I never liked the yeti's much - felt too stretched out on them. The Ibis geometry worked much, much better for me. I ride that bike everywhere. I won my age division in a 40 mile cross country race on it and then, went downhilling on her the next day. Whether rocking hi-line in sedona, captian ahab in moab, or 401 in crested butte, I adore that bike with every fiber of my being. Can't wait to get back on her once this ankle fracture heals...yea, downhilling is great and all until you fall 10 feet off a ramp onto a boulder field...

    We'll be back in October!

    In all honesty, you really can't go wrong with any of the bikes you mentioned. They are all amazing at what they do which is everything. Can you get on any of these bikes and test out the geometry? An amazing bike is an amazing bike...but only if it fits you and your riding style.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowgypsy View Post
    Get it. My husband has an SB-66 and adores that bike. Climbs like a dream and descends like a better dream.

    With the 27.5 craze, there are insanely good deals out there. I picked up a Mojo HD full XT build, Fox 36 up front, the works, for $3K. The hubby's 66 was about the same (XT build, just under 26ib). I never liked the yeti's much - felt too stretched out on them. The Ibis geometry worked much, much better for me. I ride that bike everywhere. I won my age division in a 40 mile cross country race on it and then, went downhilling on her the next day. Whether rocking hi-line in sedona, captian ahab in moab, or 401 in crested butte, I adore that bike with every fiber of my being. Can't wait to get back on her once this ankle fracture heals...yea, downhilling is great and all until you fall 10 feet off a ramp onto a boulder field...

    We'll be back in October!

    In all honesty, you really can't go wrong with any of the bikes you mentioned. They are all amazing at what they do which is everything. Can you get on any of these bikes and test out the geometry? An amazing bike is an amazing bike...but only if it fits you and your riding style.
    Thank you for the advice Snowgipsy and hope that ankle heals fast! Yes I was thinking of checking some stores out and seeing them first hand. I am 6'2" so the geometry might be a big deal. Will definitely try a few and see how they feel, 26 seems to be the way to go, you get a lot more bike for the money and personally don't buy in all this marketing stuff, people have being winning races on 26's and even if that craze had some truth to it at my level I would never see the benefits anyway, so 26 it is ! Thank you for advice!!

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