2019 Canyon Spectral CF 7.0 vs 8.0 - RockShox vs Fox- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. 2019 Canyon Spectral CF 7.0 vs 8.0 - RockShox vs Fox

    I'm considering to buy Canyon Spectral CF 7.0 or CF 8.0. The reason I'd like to buy is that my 3 years old Spectral AL 2016 150/140 travel broke above BB and I don't trust it anymore. Maybe I was abusing it a little more than it was designed for, but I don't go to bikeparks that often. Mostly local trails, gnarlier stuff, long riding and descends with backpack over Alps, etc...

    I understand that:
    • the bikes are now +/- same price and weight (CF 8 weighs about 100 g more because of Fox 36 but lighter wheels)
    • CF 8 has M1700 with a ratchett. I've got 36t on my current M1700 so I'd reuse that.
    • CF 7 has XD hub with 10-50 cassette, on CF 8 I'd put a Sunrace 11-50. Should work, but a little shorter shifting range - like a half a gear.
    • Fox Transfer dropper on CF 8 vs a stock one made by TranzX on CF 7.
    • CF 8 has better brakes - Shimano XT.
    • I already own some service equipment for Shimano brakes and Fox suspension for me and rest of my family, so that favors CF 8 a little.


    What I don't understand is how Fox 36 + DPX2 differs from RockShox Pike + Super Deluxe RCT on this bike? I saw MTB Telly claiming that RS Super Deluxe is better/more progressive than DPX2 on his Trek Remedy but this bike has more progressive suspension itself so it's a different story. Some other guy praised DPX2, so I'm confused. I personally like the plush feeling of my current 2016 Fox Float 34 with FIT4 damper more than 2016 Pike but is 2019 another story?

    Thanks for input!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by koubic View Post
    I'm considering to buy Canyon Spectral

    What I don't understand is how Fox 36 + DPX2 differs from RockShox Pike + Super Deluxe RCT on this bike? I saw MTB Telly claiming that RS Super Deluxe is better/more progressive than DPX2 on his Trek Remedy but this bike has more progressive suspension itself so it's a different story. Some other guy praised DPX2, so I'm confused. I personally like the plush feeling of my current 2016 Fox Float 34 with FIT4 damper more than 2016 Pike but is 2019 another story?

    Thanks for input!
    FWIW
    I just put a 2019 Pike RCT3 on my Fuel EX and it is plush yet very well controlled. It replaces the Fox Rhythm 34 Grip fork, which was good but not great. I also have a 2016 Fox Performance 34 Fit4 on another bike, and Id say the 2019 Pike is noticeably plusher on small bumps with more control throughout the stroke. I was apprehensive to go RockShox, but Im really happy with the Pike and especially at the price, which was (on sale) about $300 less than Fox Factory 34.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    Thanks for valuable input! It's good to reassure that new Spectral on RS would work noticeably better than 3 years old Spectral on Fox...

  4. #4
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    Assuming the combination of shock and linkage isn't too progressive to begin with, progressiveness is controlled with spacers.

    Fox/Rockshox have gone back and forth over the past 4-5 years but current higher-end stuff is pretty dialed on both sides. And I would be confident that Canyon has the base tunes of either properly chosen for the bike. IMO, either would be great with only subtle differences to distinguish them and I'd be happy with either.
    Do the math.

  5. #5
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    You might want to consider just buying a new frame, maybe something burlier that can take more abuse, and/or one that has a frame replacement policy with a company that works out better for you.

    As a 2018 Spectral owner, I am curious about your experience with Canyon regarding your frame damage, and any possibility of a frame replacement at reduced cost.

  6. #6
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    Fortunately, I'll get a new frame for free on my current Spectral 2016 because it's a fault of manufacturer. I didn't crash, the last drop for the frame to broke was a small bump while peddaling on a dirt road. It seems like a design fault, see my pics: https://photos.app.goo.gl/9ypTGohSjENRAq1v5

    I broke seat tube apart in the narrowest place where's also a hole for a dropper cable. The seat tube has been under a lot of tension - by design - because the damper is welded to the seat tube unlike e.g. Giant which distributes force partially to the downtube.

    That's why I don't trust it. It's a design fault and the bike lasted me 3 years so it's a good chance it'll break again in 3 years. Seems to me that old Spectral was a too light bike. I broke the frame on my bike vacation and I was damn lucky that another guy from our crew just quit so I borrowed his bike. If the guy hadn't quit, I'd have had a ruined vacation.

  7. #7
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    I can't speak for the 'tuning' selected by the manufacturer nor it's compatibility with your leverage ratio, what I can tell you is that RockShox flat makes a higher quality product on the inside of their forks and shocks. For that matter on the outside too as all of their relative forks are stiffer than the Fox competitor.

  8. #8
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    Ok, thanks for input, but I think 36 is a bit stiffer than Pike. These 2 forks are considered. Don't you agree?

    I'm not a Fox fanboy, but I already own oil for normal service of lowers, so that with a bit of added stiffness makes me think Fox in this setup will be better for me than RockShox.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by koubic View Post
    Ok, thanks for input, but I think 36 is a bit stiffer than Pike. These 2 forks are considered. Don't you agree?

    I'm not a Fox fanboy, but I already own oil for normal service of lowers, so that with a bit of added stiffness makes me think Fox in this setup will be better for me than RockShox.
    There is a chart floating around out there but I can't seem to locate it.

    As I remember from most flexy to stiffest was Fox 34, Pike, Fox 36, Yari/ Lyrik with the Pike being right at, but just below the Fox 36.

    It matters more to have a laterally stiffer fork if you are heavy, aggressive, or have a longer travel fork.

    Good luck.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  10. #10
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    Good job!

    Update: I bought Spectral CF 8. My first ride impressions:

    - My XL size is quite similar to 2016 Spectral XL, which is great.
    - It significantly outperforms my old 2016 Spectral on jumps (just ~0.5m high) and even more in a fast rocky terrain. I didn't expect that much of a difference. It's just more stable and controllable. It was obvious after the first jump. It slightly outperforms even 2016 Strive which has almost the same geometry - mainly because of newer=better suspension.
    - Climbing: generally good, but I think a bit worse than on my 2016 Spectral. Plus 11-46 cassette is just a too small range for me. Small 10 cog is missing for quick transfers on flat or slightly downhill terrain, big 50 is missing in long steep climbs.
    - Fox 36 - it really shined on a fast rocky terrain where it stayed nicely stable and on jumps where it showed a good progression. I've got 80 kg and when I put ~55 psi there, I found the fork to be a little too stiff. Not plush on small roots and using just 2/3 of travel on small jumps. So I put 50 psi which seemed like a sweet spot for me.
    - Fox DPX2 - I put ~200 psi which seemed ok with approx. 30% sag. I think the frame has more to do with bike's great rear progression than this shock. But it's great anyway. When I needed it to stiffen a bit, I just clicked it to middle setting and it basically stopped moving during pedalling but was able to ride mellow trails really comfortably.
    - Brakes: four piston Shimano M8020 are on first ride same as 2 piston. Shimano says it's got just 10% more power, but higher reliability. Can't comment much on that, except my front rotor kept touching pads and I couldn't stop the noise for good without trying to repair it.
    - Water bottle - only 0.75l fits there even in my XL frame. And I went for side loading which was I think necessary.
    - Frame case - go ahead and laugh at me, but I think it's good to carry a basic repair kit on my bike. The small box for Spectral looks really clean. Some say it doesn't fit anything, but look on my pics:

    2019 Canyon Spectral CF 7.0 vs 8.0 - RockShox vs Fox-dsc_1011.jpg2019 Canyon Spectral CF 7.0 vs 8.0 - RockShox vs Fox-dsc_1012.jpg

    I fitted:
    - spare tube (light 26")
    - tube patches and glue
    - bike tool including chain repair tool
    - chain link
    - keylock
    - derailleur hanger
    - derailleur cable
    - 1x brake pads
    - rear light

    Summary: 2019 Spectral CF 8 is rad downhill, a solid climber, but I will definitely go for 10-50 Sram or 10-51 Shimano SLX/XT. Canyon has a sale on CF 7 now, so I could save like 300 EUR, get 10-50 GX, and still be on same weight, which sounds like I'll return CF 8 and get CF 7. I'll try to update this thread if I get CF 7 and ride it.

  11. #11
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    Nice. Running tubeless, I carry a tube and a few Park stick-on patches just in case. Stick-ons are more convenient to use on the trail than glue-on patches...if a bit impermanent. Since the tube is temporary, it's OK if the patches are.
    Do the math.

  12. #12
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    Congratulations. Glad to hear they are putting decent brakes on now. We had to get rid of the SRAM Guide brakes, and are also changing the drivetrain over to SLX/XT from GX Eagle (on a 2017 Spectral 7). You can get Canyon's dual water bottle mount to increase capacity a bit (the bottles are small).

  13. #13
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    I am currently riding a 2015 Spec Camber EVO Carbon (selling) - Decent bike but man it sucks the life out of me on climbs with what I consider miserable pedal bob that is horribly inefficient. I am really close to pulling trigger on 2019 Spectral - My question is will the Spectral be way over kill for doing the occasional Endurance race/event 100/200k (not enduro) - These endurance events I signed up for are on some enduro style trails but also just have miles of technical climbs - so I need an efficient pedal machine as well as something to get me through some technical trails when I am spent and riding alone in the dark etc. The rest of my riding is everything from Midwest local trails to an annual trip out west (Moab/Fruita). Sorry to hijack thread but could not find a better spot to jump in than here - thanks.

  14. #14
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    Do you have any bad experience with Sram GX 1x12? I like the new 12sp SLX/XT more, but didn't try it... Thanks, I know about he bottles, but found it not really worth extra 0,05 l for that money.

  15. #15
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    I think for riding endurance races with lots of technical sections or just regular trail riding, Neuron is exactly ment for that. For the same price, it's about 1 kg lighter than Spectral, bigger wheels will help maintaining speed over roots and rocks and you can raise the fork from 130 to 140 to gain a bit more DH ability. One guy from GMBN rode pretty hard BC Race on a Neuron with 140 or 150 fork. I'd pick carbon that should not be fatigued that much after years of abuse. Neuron 2019 is similar to old Spectral 29, but that wasn't a hit for some reason. I think only if you want to hit bikeparks with a proper machine, really work on your DH skills or have something really playful on descends, it's good to get something burlier like Spectral.

  16. #16
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    Soo, I returned Spectral CF 8 and got CF 7 because it was 300 EUR cheaper and with a better drivetrain. I had 2 rides on my CF 7, so I can answer my own question!

    My humble comparison of CF 7 and CF 8:

    - Pike is noticably more supple on small bumps (I've got ~60 psi, on Fox 36 I got ~50). I didn't notice any real life difference in stiffness from Fox 36 that would make me identify what fork am I riding, but I didn't rode them back to back. Pike has got a pretty good mid stroke support, doesn't dive. 36 doesn't dive too and maybe it outperforms Pike a little on a fast rocky terrain where it stayed even a bit more predictable. I rode the new Spectral 8 with 36, that was huge difference over old Spectral so it might have biased my opinion. Anyway - no real life difference to me. Another difference between them is 3 modes on 36 (open, pedal, lock), whereas Pike has only LSC which is far from a lockout and it's harder to turn the knob - less practical.
    - SuperDeluxe RCT vs Fox DHX - didn't notice a real difference for DH. Frame makes a bigger difference. Plus for Fox - 3 modes like on fork (open, pedal, lock) whereas RS has only 2 (open, pedal). Plus for RockShox - no need for a tool for adjusting LSC, easier to turn the pedal switch which is also on the right (drivetrain) side (I like to hold handlebars with left hand and manipulate with bike with right hand).
    - Guide R four piston vs Shimano XT four piston - personal opinion I guess. I heard Guides are garbage but was pleasantly surprised that Guides break nicely and I can give power with more precision (a bit tougher but longer stroke on Guides).
    - Seatpost - so far no noticable difference in feeling between Fox Transfer and Iridium (BrandX / TranzX). Both had a little play.
    - Wheels - weight difference is just 50g so I really didn't feel any difference. The only bad is hubs, I'd like to have 36 or 54t engagement over 24t in my cheaper pawl system. I'm considering XM481 rims with 350 hubs and DT Competition spokes which is pretty much equivalent to XM1501. This custom wheel build can be had for 500 EUR with 54t ratchett.

    So all in all, 10-50 GX Eagle range makes night and day difference to me. I only miss wheel engagement a little. Fox vs RS - to me it's just an emotional weird feeling that I have a cheaper suspension (not worse!) and a fork about which I could irrelevantly doubt if it's stiff enough for me. But hey, it's more supple.

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