Thinking of moving to Alaska- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Thinking of moving to Alaska

    My girlfriend and I are thinking about packing up and leaving the humid state of VA. Right now we live in Richmond and we are just tired of it and the humidity. I was wondering if you guys could give us any advice. We have been looking in the Anchorage area. Whats good around there: parks/trails, bike shops, restaurants/bars/coffee shops/cafe, grocery stores, employment. We would just like some local insight.

    Thanks
    David

  2. #2
    i drink shower water
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    my advice... dont come here. the winters suck. I grew up here and moved to CO then came home for this summer. I cant wait to get back to Colorado. If you can afford it get a cabin here for the summer but get the EFFF out in the winter. you cant ride unless you wnat to get a winter bike and go on cold flat boring rides.
    Prison is hard, everything else is easy

  3. #3
    rio
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    Cold boring

    would you like to ride from the Flat Top parking lot to Hill Top via the Gorge Trail or a Hill Side Mangler course or Soggy Bottom route with me ??? opppps those would be to boring , oh, never mind !

  4. #4
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    Hey, I just came up from humid ol' Virginia this past May (from Louisa County) and have moved into the Anchorage area. I've never been one for built up areas (like Richmond, Fredericksburg, NoVa), so I find Anchorage to be just right. There's easy access to many trail networks, I I find my route to work VERY bike commuting friendly (only 1/2 mile of the route is on the side of the road--the rest is on the paved trail network paralleling a lot of the major roads throughout the city). So, at least during the summer, commuting via bike is extremely easy; I haven't had the chance to try it during the winter (Which I do plan on trying at least every now and then)

    As far as the winters, I love the snow, I love the cold, and while I haven't experienced the riding, I have taken a look at some of the ride reports posted in the forum--there's a group of people that sure have a pretty good time and I'll be taking part in that as soon as I finish my Slope work in October. I've never been uber-picky about riding, but I think the area has plenty of riding opportunity throughout the year.

    As far as jobs, I'm don't know what you're looking for, but from a recent college graduate, some fields can be pretty hard to get into when you're 5000 miles away. I found few companies willing to talk to me when I was in Virginia, but they were more than willing when I was up in Anchorage (I was up here for a week and a half this past winter) which kind of makes sense, because why would a company take seriously some one who's that far away. But once you get your foot in the door (or if you have a really good resume I suppose), employment hasn't been too hard.

    Anchorage is like any other American city, it has all the 'comforts' (i.e. good restaurants, most major chain stores) so that it won't be like stepping back in time (which some people in VA thought I was doing when I moved up here). Food and general merchandise are a little more expensive up here, but there's no sales tax in Anchorage, so it's not quite as bad. Gas prices reflect the prices for the rest of the U.S., but they're literally a few weeks behind the rest of the U.S...

    One thing to consider before moving up here, housing is ridiculously expensive. I thought Charlottesville in VA was overpriced, but don't even plan to get a starter home for less than 250-300k (which I'm looking for right now) and rent is just as expensive for a decent place; I don't want to rent because a mortgage payment is only going to be a little higher...

    Oh, and the drive up here was awesome--I wish I could have enjoyed it more, but I only had a week to do it, so me and my best friend traveled the 4978 miles in four days and seven hours. Have plenty of money for gas though!

    If you have anymore questions feel free to ask or PM me!

    Anyways, I'm glad I decided to move up here, well worth it in my opinion.
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  5. #5
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    What kind of imployement would you guys be looking for?

    If you can earn a living and like the outdoors then Ak is a cool place.

    One problem is the cost of traveling back to see family.

    Most of us have learned that the family outside (an Ak term for the lower 48) won't travel to AK so if you want to see them you have to take time off and pay for the airfare. In the 33 years I've been here, I can count on one hand the relatives that have make the trek to AK.

    I bike in the summer and snowmachine in the winter.

    I like the mild winters in southcentral. I lived in the Arctic for 10 years (Kotzebue) so by comparison Anchoarge is mild.

    Truth is; our south central winters are milder than Montana, or Minnesota.
    Ride hard, Drag the broken pieces back, Share lusty tales of adventure & Tell everyone, " I almost stuck the landing".

  6. #6
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    Alaska is not for everyone. I love the winters. I love the summers. I love everything in between. Winter riding is a religious experience. Knik glacier anyone? Check other threads for how to get set up for winter riding - pretty basic and minimalist: hardtail + studded tires. If you find any Alaskan mountain bike experience boring, then your eyes must be locked on your front wheel.

  7. #7

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    As Palmer Jenny said, "Winter" riding is indeed a Religious Experience. And the key on surviving the clod winters is staying active.

  8. #8
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    Don't listen to those Colorado fanboys! Alaska rules! I've lived in both places (Colorado Springs) and I like Anchorage better. We have like 10,000 coffee shops and it seems like a new bike shop opens every week (hehe). It's a good-sized city with everything you would want.

    The icky guy up above hit most of the other points...see you soon!

  9. #9
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    Whats the weather like right now? Its absolutley miserable here right now. If its nice you guys just might see us.

  10. #10
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    If you're a city person Anchorage is ok. Lots of summer riding around the city and great riding within a couple of hours south of town. If your tastes run to small towns Fairbanks is a great place. Not nearly as much good summer riding but the winter trails are great. Much better weather than Anchorage which is downright rainy and cloudy most summers. Anchorage winters are worse with wet snow and thaws all winter long making for iceing conditions. Fairbanks summers are great but we can have a bad fire year now and then. We seldom see solid grey overcast most summers which seems to the the norm in Anchorage. Winters are cold but little snowfall and best of all it seldom thaws so there is very little icing. Cold and dry. Great N. lights and as stated before lots and lots of good winter riding close to town.

    Good people in Fairbanks and after 37 years in Alaska it still has a nice Alaska feel to it, whatever the hell that is. Anchorage lost that feeling by the early 70's. Except for the great country surrounding it Anchorage could be any mid sized city in the states. t

  11. #11
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    Alaska can be great

    Alaska is a great place to be. You gotta' be tough though.


    akdeluxe
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  12. #12

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    Alaska is fantastic! Highly recommended!!! Ski every day in the winter and ride every day in the summer. Wildlife, wide open space, endless list of must-do trips. Moved here in 1980 as a young adult, and now not so young, but love it as much as ever...

  13. #13
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    Hab... stop whining.. its why I moved out of Colorado!

    yeah.... nothing to do for some.
    Everything to do for many...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
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    Great pictures. Kinda says it all. If those pictures look like fun to you, you don't mind the darkness, and cold is just another temperature, you'll like AK.

    Most folks who can't stand it here find the winter darkness the biggest problem. My advice is to avoid Alaska if you don't want to go outside when it gets colder than 20 Deg F because you won't get enough daylight to fend off the blues.



    Will

  15. #15
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    I hope ANC politicians don't start talking that sales tax crap again .

    Yes, the darkness is worse than the cold...Pray,Ride, Work, or Drink a lot...thats the routine...

  16. #16

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    ... and if we just ... Winter Sex

    Winter is as good as the summer. And summers here are like sex: When it's good, it's great! And when it's bad it's still pretty good.

    If you don't winter darkness, get a headlamp. I don't cycle in winter because I ski every day, and some of my best ski 'days' have been after dark with my headlamp turned off under a full moon. Yea, days are short in winter, but even on the solstice you can easily ski for 5 hours without a headlamp - get a great workout while enjoying fantastic powder, classic XC or skate ski trails!

    For a change of pace, play some pickup hockey on the outdoor rinks which the muni maintains very well.

    Anchorage has really great winter weather, averaging 21 deg. F in January, perfect for making POWDER! Wear a thin base layer with a light windproof layer, put on your skis and you'll be sweating in 21F weather.

    Mountain biking and skiing are perfectly complementary sports - great fun, great exercise and great in & around Anchorage.

  17. #17
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    Supposed to be 70 degrees and sunny today. That will be a nice change from all the rain!

  18. #18
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    Just going to reiterate what others have said. You have to embrace winter up to here to make it. There is so much to do and the serenity of winter makes up for its' darkness and cold. Best backcountry skiing in the country, much unclimbed ice, world class ski trails, and an amazing network of snowmachine trails that lend themselves to even more amazing winter bike riding.

    Think of Alaska as one big playground. Any type of trip you can imagine can be done here, pack raft, climb, traverse, and ski - and there is a good chance that it has never been done before!! Catch monster trout, grayling, and salmon for dinner; and drink right out of the stream.

    Remove yourself from the crud of the lower 48 and move north. Although Anchorage is a city by any standard and very different from the rest of AK, it still is uniquely Alaskan providing the best of both worlds. If you can work and live in a more rural setting then by all means do it - you won't regret it!!

  19. #19
    i drink shower water
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    im not whining... its just my feelings towards AK. i love the summer here, unfortunatly it is too short. i like to ride my bike all year round, on trails with steep technical rock gardens and ladder drops. there is not much of that here, and the little there is you can only ride for 4 months. thats what im talking about.

    I have ridden the Flatop to Hilltop runs a lot this summer, they are a lot of fun. however biking is not a hobby for me, its more my life than anything. i need to be able to make a moab run, ride a freeride park at Keystone. Cant do that here.

    i could AK being nice for a weekend warrior but for some one like me who enjoys freeride parks, or NORBA DH races, or whatever, AK doesnt have it. I could AK being a XC dream but where is the progressive DH? Look around, the bike shops dont even carry it. say what you want, im not ashamed to be a CO Fanboy, everyone is a Fanboy on this forum. here in the one you get the AK Fan boys. riding is just as good if not better in other places all over the world. get over it.
    Prison is hard, everything else is easy

  20. #20
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    Why is that?

    Ladders,parks and very techy stuff is real cool. Very popular in the mags and such. It is a good percentage of the industry. It can be done here in Anch. I know it can happen. There is land for it. City officals have even mentioned the desire for it. It won't happen from within any of the existing groups, thats for sure. That isn't what they are about(maybe STA down the road a ways). Thats ok. The user group that likes that stuff just needs to step foward, organize their own "club". Become legit.Do the work and make it happen. It's not easy, but it can be done. Its happened all over the lower 48. Why not here? Only the big travel guys know that answer.
    Colorado does have killer riding. Maybe the best in the world. When you get there, be sure to thank the people who made it happen. Good luck!

    akdeluxe
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    JT

  21. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by hab1b
    get over it.
    Sounds too me like you need to go back home A.S.A.P.

    Simply because AK does not offer what you like saying that it sucks is really shallow and arrogant in my opinion not to mention, with that shiity mind set you simply miss out on an awful lot that AK has to offer.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valhalla
    Catch monster trout, grayling, and salmon for dinner; and drink right out of the stream.
    Umm, yeah. Don't drink right out of the stream, unless you like giardia.

  23. #23
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    Duh

    "im not whining... its just my feelings towards AK."

    Yikes. How is it that some people move here and expect it to exactly like the place they left - then can't shut up about it? Alaska is a great place precisely because it is not like any other place. There are many other great places on the planet, if you don't like it here move somewhere that makes you happy, but stop whining.

    Having grown up in Boulder, lived in Jackson, Bozeman & Salt Lake I'd have to say that those are nice places - but I'll take Alaska over any of them every time. Why live somewhere you are not passionate about? Life it too short.

    As for moving here from VA - others have said it well. Even if you eventually leave, living here will have been a great adventure and an eye-opening experience. Come on up!!
    Last edited by Stroganof; 08-09-2007 at 03:29 PM.

  24. #24
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    Been drinking out of rivers and streams for up here for over 15 years - you have to leave the road system to do it....

  25. #25
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    hab, sure if freeride, downhill at ski areas, north shore trails and slick rock is all you want to do, then sure, say what you will, and you should then live in those places where you can do that and not talk trash about AK riding. Alaska has pleanty riding to offer those with a sence of adventure.

    Its your original post what I have beef with (as does everyone else reading this) If you think winters suck up here then yes, you need to either open your mind, of stay in colorado where its all sunny and warm.

    And yes, saying "winters suck" is actually 100% whining.. pretty close to "its raining" and "my feet hurt".

    riding is riding where ever you are in the world, you have to embrace where you are and appreciate it in the moment.

  26. #26
    Raubgee
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    The best thing about Alaska. EVER.

    I like how we don't have snakes.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by raubgee
    I like how we don't have snakes.
    Or disease infested ticks that cause arthritis and heart failure

  28. #28
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    awinterbiker,I'm not sure which Anchorage your describing but its not the one I live in.Yes we do get some crapy weather from time to time,but as far as I am concerned we certainly get our share of good weather.I see you forgot to mention those lovely -60 degree cold snaps you guys get.If Anchorage were as bad as you have described I would have left years ago.

  29. #29
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    I agree with Jeff, at least for the summer parts. Although this is my first summer that I'm living up here (which has been pretty good in my out-of-state opinion), I've been up here for five weeks previously split between two summers--they weren't as cloudy and rainy as you've described.

    But, akwinterbiker, there is some truth in what you say, and well, I'm not used. Unlike the east coast where we might have 2 days of overcast/light rain/drizzle, Anchorage can have 4-5 days of that in a row . It's not necessarily bad, as it's still warm, but I'm used to the thunderstorms and heavy rain, not drawing it out over a few days. But on the other hand, I can think of a few week-long runs of sunny weather that we've had since I've been up here at the end of May. As far as the winter, snow is better than the first day wet snow, next day sloppy slush mess that we got back in VA. It actually sticks for more than two days up here!

    Haha, and Valhalla, now that snakes and ticks have been mentioned, I still get a hard time when I do hikes up here, because I do my best to avoid tall grass and brush still; I haven't quite gotten used to the fact that I won't have to pick off a few ticks everytime I walk through knee-deep grass...
    waaahoooooooooooooooooo

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  30. #30
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    Of course it rains here and we can have some pretty miserable Autumns (like last year), but lest we forget, this is the northern extent of the coastal temperate rain forest and we do have coastal mountains surrounding us. August 2005 was amazingly dry and really, really hot.

  31. #31
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    AK vs. CO

    Comparing Colorado to Alaska is interesting. I have only dabbed with riding in Alaska, but have ridden extensively here in Colorado, but I have formed a few opinions. Riding in Colorado is easier in terms of finding established trails that kick ass. Everything is mapped, there are lots of urban fringe parks (jeffco), alpine stuff (CT) and the freeride scene.

    It seems to me that Alaska requires that you seek it out a bit more...it requires a bit more of an adventurers spirit. It's not as efficient, but the rewards can be greater if you are willing to explore and are prepared. And can also be a lot more brutal when things go wrong.

    Personally, I find riding in Colorado to be a tad bit boring. Perhaps it's because I've been here for a decade plus, but it seems like the woods and mountains are a bit too tame here...too many condos, to many signs, etc. And I have to admit, the woods lack a certain spirit because we've basically killed off most of the native predators (grizzlies and wolves) that used to roam the hills. I like riding in Alaska with my bear bell, or coming across a wolf foot print on a muddy crossing. You just don't get that in Colorado.

    So you could argue that maybe the riding - just the riding/quality of trails - is better in Colorado. But to me, the experience of being OUT THERE is way better in Alaska.

    Quote Originally Posted by hab1b
    my advice... dont come here. the winters suck. I grew up here and moved to CO then came home for this summer. I cant wait to get back to Colorado. If you can afford it get a cabin here for the summer but get the EFFF out in the winter. you cant ride unless you wnat to get a winter bike and go on cold flat boring rides.

  32. #32
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    OK, I'll admit to some prejudice (maybe lots) against cities, I'm a hick at heart. We don't live in Fairbanks, but on 12 hillside acres out of town about 10 miles. Even when I lived south of the Alaska Range it was always well out of town. Spent a year or so in and around Anchorage when first up here in '70 and saw the start of the crazy construction boom brought on by the pipeline. As to 60F below, that hasn't happened in years, but more importantly it never happens in the hills around Fairbanks. When it's cold in town, it runs anywhere from 15 to 35 degrees warmer up here and honestly, I probably wouldn't live here if we were stuck in the valley. The colder weather sure doesn't keep me off the bike; now that I cheat with toe warmers I enjoyed biking at -40F to -50F last year. Love to experience the altered reality of those temps without sacrificing brain cells; well not too many anyway.

    As to summer, if you've never spent much time in the Interior in summer it's hard to describe how nice it is. We have a great view of the middle Tanana Valley, from west of the Big Mac to Mt. Hayes in the east and when the weather report describes the day as cloudy it's usually only a few puffy white clouds here and there. Working construction in the 70's and 80's up here convinced me to come up, mostly for the weather but also for the ability to get out in the boonies quickly, and as stated before there's still some of that old time Alaska feel up here.

    I almost feel sorry for the fellow that thinks winter biking is, "boring" but I can sort of understand that mindset. While I love the act of biking for it's own sake for me it's just as much about being in the woods. With winter biking you never know what changes you'll find on trails. What are those tracks from? Oh, a new side trail now that more snow fell. Fresh overflow that wasn't there yesterday. Don't even get me started about the honor of seeing wildlife. Besides trails, river overflow offers some of the best riding experiences I've ever had. Here's a link to a page from my website about a favorite river ride. t
    http://home.gci.net/~winterbiker/johnson03.html

  33. #33
    Diaskeuast
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff1962
    If Anchorage were as bad as you have described I would have left years ago.
    Jeff's right. I've found that it's common most everywhere for the people who live in smaller communities to make derogatory comments about the state's largest city -- unless they happen to be visiting it for a long weekend so they can go to a movie, eat a nice dinner, and stock up on supplies at Costco, then they love the place.

    One of the most common sayings up here is the nice thing about Anchorage is that it's so close to Alaska. That's B.S.

    Anchorage is very much Alaska. Show me another American city of this size where I can routinely dodge moose on my way to work; bald eagles can fly over my house; bears can roam the trails and back yards; salmon can run upstream; and I can see mountains on one side and water on the other, and I can pull out of my driveway and be out of town within minutes.

    In my opinion, there are three types of people who use terms like "Los Anchorage" and compare this place to the urban sprawl of major U.S. cities: 1) the socially dysfunctional who can't handle living near other human beings; 2) grouches who have been up here too long to remember what the rest of the country is like; and 3) the clueless and naive who like to think it's beneath them to live where they can easily go buy a new TV or refrigerator when the old one breaks.

    That said, I like Anchorage just fine. We shouldn't encourage more people to move here. Let's send them to Juneau to live in the rain, or to Fairbanks, where they can freeze all winter and be devoured by mosquitoes all summer.

    Dang. Must be about lunchtime. I'm gettin' cranky.

  34. #34

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    hahahhhh yea dude alaska is soo cool. there is no where to ride and there are nothing but agfgs every where man. i am in idaho and i am so glad that i am not in alaska but i will be when shchool starts but goddan yea man move to alaska that means less fasg in idaho man wow getting trashed in idaho is way better than alaska haha milses sister is hot aahhaha

    ****i alask yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

  35. #35
    Wood chips are stupid
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    Don't they have schools in Idaho?


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  36. #36
    I'm from Utah
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    Quote Originally Posted by timwoody
    Show me another American city of this size where I can routinely dodge moose on my way to work; bald eagles can fly over my house; bears can roam the trails and back yards; salmon can run upstream; and I can see mountains on one side and water on the other, and I can pull out of my driveway and be out of town within minutes.
    Pretty much Salt Lake City, if you replace moose with flower-garden-devouring mule deer, and salmon with rainbow trout. The bears in the foothills outside SLC actually drag people out of their tents and eat them, not like those wimpy Los Anchorage bears that are content to rifle around in kitchens.

    But I hear the TVs they have in SLC suck.

  37. #37
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    Reply to Timwoody

    "Jeff's right. I've found that it's common most everywhere for the people who live in smaller communities to make derogatory comments about the state's largest city -- unless they happen to be visiting it for a long weekend so they can go to a movie, eat a nice dinner, and stock up on supplies at Costco, then they love the place."

    First off badmouthing between urban and rural folk is nothing new. If you look at it historically urban life is pretty unusual; the vast majority of people that have lived-live on earth did-do so in a rural environment. Cities really took off in the 1800's when the industrial revolution needed drones and rural life for most was one of nonending labor and poverty. As to shopping, you should be happy that rural folk come to town now and then, spend their money and get out. They add to the health of the urban economy and don't put pressure on the infrastructure-congestion on a daily basis. Actually this sort of works out, cidiots come out to the country on weekends and hayseeds come in to the city. This fact is one of the best things about my lifestyle. I go out in the woods during the week when weekend warriors are scarce.


    "One of the most common sayings up here is the nice thing about Anchorage is that it's so close to Alaska. That's B.S."

    Have you lived anywhere for any length of time in Alaska besides Anchorage? I've had the pleasure of living outside of Hope for a couple of years, Portage for a year or so, outside of Houston for 8-9 years, between Delta and Tok for a couple of years, outside of Fairbanks for almost 20 years, Trapper Creek and the Keni area for shorter periods and yes even Anchorage for probably a year and a half over the years. The bush is probably about the only place where the "old Alaska" still exsits. By the way, when I came up I often heard about how I'd missed out on the "real" Alaska by coming to the state at such a late date, 1970. The best and most dramatic example I can think of is what happens when someone pulls over off the road. When I first came up it was unusual for more than one or two vehicles to pass without stopping, that completely changed within a 2-3 year span around Anchorage, it took longer the farther out of Anchorage one went. I suppose that could be said of many places.

    "Anchorage is very much Alaska. Show me another American city of this size where I can routinely dodge moose on my way to work; bald eagles can fly over my house; bears can roam the trails and back yards; salmon can run upstream; and I can see mountains on one side and water on the other, and I can pull out of my driveway and be out of town within minutes."

    I'd much rather see wildlife in their natural setting, on their terms. Seeing them in town is sort of depressing, although there can an entertaining, novelty aspect to it. They are often scared, disoriented. There's a good chance they will have a shortened lifespan and with moose they could take somebody with them. Glad you get enjoyment out of seeing them in and around a city, but wildlife being habituated to humans is not a good thing, especially for the wildlife. I do agree that one of the best things about Anchorage is that you can get out of town into beautiful country in short order.

    "In my opinion, there are three types of people who use terms like "Los Anchorage" and compare this place to the urban sprawl of major U.S. cities: 1) the socially dysfunctional who can't handle living near other human beings; 2) grouches who have been up here too long to remember what the rest of the country is like; and 3) the clueless and naive who like to think it's beneath them to live where they can easily go buy a new TV or refrigerator when the old one breaks."

    As to socially dysfunctional, like I said before, urban life is not exactly what most people are built for. I like living where we don't lock the doors at night or even during a trip to town. I have the amazing pleasure of bathing on our deck all summer long with no thought of grossing someone out. I think the best outdoor experiences are to be had solo, pretty socially dysfunctional eh? Gang shootings of course are signs of a healthy environment and well adjusted social situation. Have you been following what's been happening to this country for some time now? I'll take my socially dysfunctional lifestyle any day over living in a city. Have you ever read the classic studies of what happens to rats when forced to live in a concentrated situation? I go outside every 5 to 10 years and one of the major results from those trips is a re-appreciation of where we live. I can't comment on the "clueless and naive" remark; I don't understand it.

    "That said, I like Anchorage just fine. We shouldn't encourage more people to move here. Let's send them to Juneau to live in the rain, or to Fairbanks, where they can freeze all winter and be devoured by mosquitoes all summer."

    Again, have you lived in Fairbanks for any length of time? If not, I really can't give much weight to your opinion. I lived many years south of the Alaska Range and have always thought the mosquitoes were worse down there. Have to agree it is colder up here but for me that makes winter better for reasons stated in previous posts on this thread. By the way Juneau is damp but beautiful and has a wonderful small town feel. t

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jilleo
    Pretty much Salt Lake City, if you replace moose with flower-garden-devouring mule deer, and salmon with rainbow trout. The bears in the foothills outside SLC actually drag people out of their tents and eat them, not like those wimpy Los Anchorage bears that are content to rifle around in kitchens.

    But I hear the TVs they have in SLC suck.
    It may be true, but if in fact these BLACK bears (we have 900 lb COASTAL BROWN bears running around in Anchorage) are pulling people out of their tents outside SLC, it is a response to human habituation and conditioning. Not really a proud statement for any community to bolster.

    That being said, SLC is certainly one of the other,very few cities I would live in. It seems to have it all....oh, was that dodging mule deer instead of moose, or Mormons?

  39. #39
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    I love ak. I had the pleasure of coming up because of the army in 99-01. I am doing everything i can to get back there. I love it so much i would gladly hand towels out at FT. Wainwright gym if they would send me back. I know if the army won't send me then I will be back when i retire.

    Winterbiker i too love fairbanks. Anc was great to visit but the summers in fairbanks were enough for me to deal the long cold winter nights. When i was up there i didn't ride in the winter. When i come back i will have to look you up to ride sometime. I know i have to look up Tschezzy to ride with him as well. Well I hope you all enjoy ak for me alittle now matter where you are. Right now i am stuck in downtown Baghdad for the second time.

    T
    I will stand with the Muslims should the political winds shift in an ugly direction-B. Hussein Obama

  40. #40
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    Ya know, I was not going to post anything more on this topic until I read things like "the real Alaska"and the "bush is the only place the old Alaska still exist ".I get so sick of hearing this drivel from people who have been here longer than the rest of us.You act like anyone whose been here for less than 30 years experince's don't mean anything.You really need to get off your high horse.Alaska means something different to anyone who decides to call this state home.
    Oh, and as far as the bush goes,the job I have has taken me to over 90% of Alaska's villages over the past 14 years.And I can promise you the majority of the people in those places are tired of a lot of "old Alaska" wonderful little things like crapping in a "honey bucket" for starters.Most of what you "old timers" really miss is the fact that you were 30 years younger back then.

  41. #41
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    i also have been thinking about relocating to AK. for me i love the outdoors and the mountains. i live in the total oposit of AK and have for the past 14 years (Phoenix, Arizona) its hot here all the time. it goes from warm in the winter (60's) to the hot in the summer (110+) and stays in the 110+ from may till about august-september. i am getting sick of the desert life and having to peal my skin off my hands everytime i touch my steering wheel during the heat of the days. the days are long and hot. i want snow and cold to bone weather. before AZ i live near lake taho in cali and loved it there. i want green mountains and such and the bone cold. you just might see me up there on my bike after this summer.

  42. #42
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    Nobody ever said you had to be here 30 years to experience the old Alaska. Just that you wouldn't experience it in the big city. Whether the old Alaska apeals to you is another question entirely. Having lived here 41 years, I can attest that Anchorage is not the place I grew up in, and that this is both good and bad.

    I can also attest (having visted more villages than I can count) that the bush is where you can find the old Alaska and also an entirely new kind of Alaska dependent on drugs, alcohol, and welfare. Even the bush isn't immune to change.

    Will

  43. #43
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    Jeff62 said, " Ya know, I was not going to post anything more on this topic until I read things like "the real Alaska"and the "bush is the only place the old Alaska still exist."


    Jeff I thought I was done with this thread too but I won't let someone misquote me and leave it at that. What I said about the bush was, " The bush is probably about the only place where the 'old Alaska' still exists." I qualified my statement; by leaving out the words "probably" and "about", you changed the meaning of my words to no small extent. Don't do that.

    You also said, "You act like anyone whose been here for less than 30 years experince's don't mean anything.You really need to get off your high horse."

    I can't figure out how you came up with that. What I said was, "By the way, when I came up I often heard about how I'd missed out on the "real" Alaska by coming to the state at such a late date, 1970." Mentioning all the places where I'd lived wasn't about how long I've been up here, it was about statements made in this thread by people about places they probably had no long term experience with. Then I went and made a statement about just that when I mentioned the bush. I haven't lived in the bush so really shouldn't have used that as an example, although I did qualify it with the words, "probably" and "about". Actually I've always admired most newcomers to the state; coming up here with no family or support takes courage, to say the least. Many come up for the same reasons I did, I'd visited here and loved the country and the people and saw Alaska as a place to live in a manner that's getting rarer in the world.

    Last of all you said, "Most of what you "old timers" really miss is the fact that you were 30 years younger back then."

    It's sad that discussion and debate so often turns into attacks of a more personal nature. I for one have enjoyed the process of aging and wouldn't trade the benefits for being young again, as long I can ride my bike. t

  44. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtdart
    hahahhhh yea dude alaska is soo cool. there is no where to ride and there are nothing but agfgs every where man. i am in idaho and i am so glad that i am not in alaska but i will be when shchool starts but goddan yea man move to alaska that means less fasg in idaho man wow getting trashed in idaho is way better than alaska haha milses sister is hot aahhaha

    ****i alask yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
    oh damn i am sober now and still hate alaska

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