Thermal expansion related to hub adjustment- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Thermal expansion related to hub adjustment

    Here in Michigan, we don't get quite the extreme temperatures as you do in Alaska, but we do see some periods of -20 ish Deg F. How do you deal with the thermal expansion of materials in terms of bearing adjustment. I have King hubs with Aluminium axles, and a mildly heated garage to store my bicycle. I can either adjust my hubs at inside ambient temp, and deal with some bearing slop out in the cold, or adjust after being in the cold and have tight bearings in the warmth.

    Thanks in advance
    Kevin

  2. #2
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    Reputation: pbasinger's Avatar
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    Hmmm, never been an issue.
    The Kings do tend to be more finicky when it comes to adjustment, but could the QR be part of the problem?

  3. #3
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    Bolt on

    I guess I neglected to add that both the hubs are bolt on.

    I am more inquiring as to how you deal with bearing adjustment there. Do you have any tricks? What do some of you use for hubs?

  4. #4

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    Easy fix...

    leave the bike in the cold like many people do here in AK

  5. #5
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    My garage is not heated at all, and it's often only a little warmer in there than it is outside. It really never gets any colder here than 20 deg F. Is it ok to leave bikeparts but especially expensive tools from park tool, like my TS-2 truing stand and chain measuring device, out there in the cold? Bikeshops usually have their tools in their heated workplace.

  6. #6
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
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    20F shouldn't affect your tools. unless maybe they've been manufactured poorly and have significant voids in the materials. even then...

    the only applicable benefit to warm-ish tools at that temp is that your hands will be warmer while using them.

  7. #7
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    Anything warmer than -40 or so should not cause any problems for full metal tools. Plastic tire irons are far more likely to break when used in really cold conditions, but even they won't be permanently affected, i.e. if you store them in -40 for a year, then warm them up and use them, there is no way to find out they've been out in -40. If you actually ride when it's really cold, it's a good bet to get tire irons with actual metal in the core and plastic only on the surface.

    The only tool which could possibly suffer permanent damage from such non-extreme cold is something with rubber seals in it, like a pump. Even there, I've never noticed any problems in real life, even with most of my tools usually in unheated storage (but the coldest we've had in years was only about -20 F or so).

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