Riding in conditions above freezing- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Riding in conditions above freezing

    Hello
    I've had my FatBike together for about 2 weeks now. Much of the time the temperatures have been above freezing. I've found it difficult to ride in these conditions, because I sink into the snow. I'm riding trails used for xc skiing or trails used by snow mobiles, it's not unbroken snow. Maybe there's a total of a foot of snow on the ground once it's been ridden over. I'd appreciate advice about whether I'm wasting time trying to ride when it's 35F out.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    I'm from Utah
    Reputation: Jilleo's Avatar
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    I'm in the same boat as you ... always trying to ride in wet, warm, soft snow. Do you usually head out early in the morning? If the temperature drops well below freezing overnight, this kind of snow can harden up to some of the best riding conditions. But if it's late in the afternoon, 35 degrees, and skiers and snowmobilers have been tearing up the trail all day long, forget about it.

    People with more experience with fat bikes probably have better advice than me, so I'm hoping others chime in on this thread. But the only solution I've found is meeting soft snow with equally soft tires. Let those suckers run low and squishy. It's like riding through peanut butter. There is a point, however, where you have to decide whether it's better to spin like a sweaty banshee for a measly 4 mph or walk at a comfortable 2.5.

  3. #3
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    I don't usually ride in the morning but have thought of that as well if we get more cycles that get ovr freezingnin the day and below at night. My struggle has been that I'm on top of the snow then I drop down in a softer spot - it's not consistent. It's also hilly here so there isn't a lot of flat riding and trying to get re-started once I come to a halt on an uphill stretch is a challenge :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jilleo
    I'm in the same boat as you ... always trying to ride in wet, warm, soft snow. Do you usually head out early in the morning? If the temperature drops well below freezing overnight, this kind of snow can harden up to some of the best riding conditions. But if it's late in the afternoon, 35 degrees, and skiers and snowmobilers have been tearing up the trail all day long, forget about it.

    People with more experience with fat bikes probably have better advice than me, so I'm hoping others chime in on this thread. But the only solution I've found is meeting soft snow with equally soft tires. Let those suckers run low and squishy. It's like riding through peanut butter. There is a point, however, where you have to decide whether it's better to spin like a sweaty banshee for a measly 4 mph or walk at a comfortable 2.5.

  4. #4
    Wood chips are stupid
    Reputation: akdeluxe's Avatar
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    May 2004
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    You're doing the right thing. Letting out air is one of two solutions I can think of. Some riders will run only about 4-7lbs in really soft conditions. You can also try finding a line that runs over a thiner snow cover. Unless a ski club has gotten their hands on them, trails are not perfectly smooth and flat. The bumps and ridges sometimes have less snow on them and might provide a firmer surface to roll on. Search for them. I do. Pushing works too.



    aldeluxe
    "Trust me,you don't want a big baby."

    JT

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