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Thread: LikeABike

  1. #1
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    LikeABike

    Has anyone seen these anywhere in Anc? One of the guys I used to bike with in Germany had one for his kid and he used to rip around on it. It's time to retire the trike and get my boy on 2 wheels.

    http://www.likeabikeusa.com/

  2. #2
    Diaskeuast
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    I've seen those things only online, so I can't claim any experience with them, but I've always had doubts about how useful they could be.

    I bought a trailer bike -- one of those single-wheel, pull-behind contraptions -- for my daughter as soon as she was old enough to sit on it and pedal. I'm convinced that it taught her how to ride a bike. When it came time to take the training wheels off her regular bike, she literally rode away from me five seconds after we started across a parking lot with my hand hooked under the saddle to keep her steady.

    She was already so comfortable with pedaling and the feeling of a bike leaning over on turns that when she looked back and saw that I had let go of her bike, she just giggled and kept riding. Except for showing her how to start pedaling from a dead stop, the lesson was over. I just sat down and watched her ride loops for the next 30 minutes. After the more frustrating experience of teaching her older brother to ride, it was really nice to get a kid riding with no falls, no tears and no frustration.

    The other advantage of a trailer bike is that it extends your range on rides as your kid grows. The kid can help pedal up hills, and coast when he needs to rest. Best of all, when he insists on riding his own bike, you can lock it up when he gets tired, then carry him on the trailer bike and pick up his other bike on the way back to the car. There were many days when that kept both me and my daughter happy: I could get in a real ride without forcing her into a death march for her small legs.

  3. #3
    Ologist
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    This month's issue of dirt rag has an article about the transformation of a cyclist to father. Among some of the many biking incarnations he has bought/created to embrace biking with his kids is one of those bikes.

  4. #4
    The devil is an angel too
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    Quote Originally Posted by timwoody
    I've seen those things only online, so I can't claim any experience with them, but I've always had doubts about how useful they could be.

    I bought a trailer bike -- one of those single-wheel, pull-behind contraptions -- for my daughter as soon as she was old enough to sit on it and pedal. I'm convinced that it taught her how to ride a bike. When it came time to take the training wheels off her regular bike, she literally rode away from me five seconds after we started across a parking lot with my hand hooked under the saddle to keep her steady.

    She was already so comfortable with pedaling and the feeling of a bike leaning over on turns that when she looked back and saw that I had let go of her bike, she just giggled and kept riding. Except for showing her how to start pedaling from a dead stop, the lesson was over. I just sat down and watched her ride loops for the next 30 minutes. After the more frustrating experience of teaching her older brother to ride, it was really nice to get a kid riding with no falls, no tears and no frustration.

    The other advantage of a trailer bike is that it extends your range on rides as your kid grows. The kid can help pedal up hills, and coast when he needs to rest. Best of all, when he insists on riding his own bike, you can lock it up when he gets tired, then carry him on the trailer bike and pick up his other bike on the way back to the car. There were many days when that kept both me and my daughter happy: I could get in a real ride without forcing her into a death march for her small legs.
    The idea with this things is to start them before they can pedal. We got one last January in Spain, and my son has used it -he is only two and a half. The idea is that they can learn to balance themselves without having to worry about the pedals.

    My kid had fun with it, although the one we have was a bit too tall for him at the beginning of the summer, so he had problems pushing himself. I would push him and let go, to see ho far he got. (then my wife thought that it would be easier for him to learn to balance while standing still rather than moving. Yes, she is blond and yes, the little dude did some track stands)

  5. #5
    It's All About We!
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    Just take a little bike, something w/ 20" or 24" wheels - whatever fits, and remove the crank. Typically, cranks on little bikes are one-piece cranks, so you'll end up taking the entire BB out, along w/ the chain, of course. Should work like a charm. Set the seat low and let 'em rip.

    Good luck. Send photos (action shots)

  6. #6
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    He's only 2 (next month). After seeing my friends little kid 3 y.o. ripping down hills and riding around the "kiddie" course I became a believer. I thought about a regular bike with cranks removed but just afraid of him bumping/crashing metal into our semi-nice furniture. I think something made of wood would be better.

    These are supposed to be real good to learn balancing so when they get big enough for a real bike it's a lot easier.

  7. #7
    Diaskeuast
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenK
    yes, the little dude did some track stands
    Sweet! (But how are his wheelies?)

  8. #8
    War machine member
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    Specialized has "borrowed" the idea and made a similar bike called the Hotwalker (I may be off on the name, but it's close). The Bicycle Shop had a few in stock last time I was in there.

  9. #9
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    I'd rather have solid wheels...I can see little fingers getting caught in spokes. Or maybe the cat muwhahaha!

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