Alaska Brevet Series Begins 4/26/08- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    It's All About We!
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    Alaska Brevet Series Begins 4/26/08

    Hi all,

    Want to log some distance miles in preparation for Soggy Bottom? Then come ride with us in the Alaska Brevet Series. The 200K will be 4/26/08, and the 300K will be 5/10/08. Additional rides soon after.

    I can guarantee you nice, long days in the saddle, plenty of time to complete the courses (13.5 hrs. for the 200K), interesting routes, great scenery, and comradeship. These are timed, non-competitive, totally self-supported rides, with control points every 30-50K on the course.

    The 200K is sort of a Tour of Eagle River/Anchorage. The 300K is a Tour of the Valley.

    All the details are at:

    www.akcycling.com.

    Hope to see you there!
    Kevin Turinsky
    RUSA RBA - Alaska
    www.rusa.org
    http://alaskarandonneurs.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    Hmm...sounds like some good training for the Fireweed...

  3. #3
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    Definitely!

    Also, if any of you are interested in checking the ride out, but aren't quite up to 200K yet, feel free to come and do the first half. The 200K course is nicely designed so that it returns to the start at the 100K half-way point. While that's NOT the point of riding brevets, and I may catch a lot of grief for even suggesting doing that, at this point we're casual enough on the 200K season-opener to invite just about anybody who wants to roll their wheels.

    AND...if you don't feel like riding a big ride yet, but want to hang out on the course as the riders go through, I'd love to have an extra hand or two at some of the controls. Let me know. It's an open invitation! It's always a good time; always good people...
    Kevin Turinsky
    RUSA RBA - Alaska
    www.rusa.org
    http://alaskarandonneurs.blogspot.com

  4. #4
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    Insert Stupid Question Here

    There are many French words such as Brevet and Randonneur associated with this thread that I just do not know. Care to enlighten the peons?

  5. #5

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    2nd skimonkee's statement!! plz educate us!!! thx g.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, whoa, all the French stuff…I like their cheese a lot. Well, I guess that since they’re the ones who originated the practice, they got to make up all the words.

    Here goes…grab some freedom fries and read on:

    The basic idea behind randonneuring is challenging yourself on a nice, long ride. Riding a brevet (rhymes w/ “Chevrolet”), which is a type of randonnée, no matter the distance, is simply about getting on the bike and testing your mettle (fortitude) against the challenges of distance, time, fatigue, the elements, your machine, etc. It’s not much more than that.

    A brevet is a specific randonnée ridden to achieve credit toward qualifying for the longest randonnées. Most brevet series are designed w/ the purpose of preparing riders for the Grand-Daddy of all randonnées, Paris-Brest-Paris (PBP), which at 1,200Km, is held every four years. The next PBP is in 2011. But even if PBP or some other big 1,200Km event isn’t your aim, riding brevets is a fantastic way to get some great riding in, either by yourself, or with friends.

    Structurally, a brevet is a ride of a specific distance, typically between 200Km and 1,000Km, within a specific time period.

    100K (called a populaire) 6:00 hours
    200K 13:30 hours
    300K 20:00 hours
    400K 27:00 hours
    600K 40:00 hours
    1,000K 75:00 hours
    PBP 90:00 hours

    Brevets are usually held on courses rambling between towns. The courses are designed to provide as much variety as possible. Therefore, the rides are mostly interesting and scenic. I guess that depends more on your attitude at the time. There are always hills, never too many, but sometimes a lot. Brevets are totally unsupported, making you rely on your own resourcefulness, and encouraging you to “live off the land”. The generous time limits allow for this too. While you must stay on task to ride within the time limits, if you plan your ride well, there’s plenty of time to actually enjoy the ride, stop and refuel at the local cafe, make repairs, etc., instead of just hammering for a hundred miles at a time. And while brevets are unsupported, there are required checkpoints (typically at places to eat) along the route where you must have your brevet card validated to insure you’ve covered the course successfully. This only really matters if you’re aiming for some official distance award or qualification for the long randonnées.

    Locally, we get all kinds of riders. Many of the more serious road riders here use the brevet series as training for some of the big summer events. Some regional series Outside frown on that. We don’t up here though. Actually, there’s really a broad variety of riders that participate. Though you’d better put your ‘skinny tires’ on your Pugs, Wildfire, or Fatback. Oh, and I am planning a Dirt-Road-Randonnée too! It won’t be totally dirt, but enough to make it loads of fun. More on that later.

    I’ve probably made this whole brevet thing sound much more complicated that it really is. Sorry. Don’t get scared off. Just remember, it’s really, simply, about gettin’ out to ride. It’s great fun, great people. I urge you!
    Kevin Turinsky
    RUSA RBA - Alaska
    www.rusa.org
    http://alaskarandonneurs.blogspot.com

  7. #7

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    thx for the info! sounds pretty straight foward to me. i have a surly LHT commuter bike built up like a raliegh sprite i used to have w/ fenders,racks,bags, abatross bars and a b-17saddle.i have been getting some parts from rivendell for it and started seeing these terms, but never knew what they meant. you did a gr8 job of explaining!! thx a lot.

    geo.

  8. #8
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    ***200K Brevet Rescheduled for May 3rd***

    Is all this snow a cruel joke?!

    OK everyone, the 200K brevet will now be held on May 3rd.

    The 300K is still scheduled for May 10th. Unless, of course, we get more snow...

    If anyone needs me, I'll be out on the course w/ my snow shovel.
    Kevin Turinsky
    RUSA RBA - Alaska
    www.rusa.org
    http://alaskarandonneurs.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    Aw...I was gonna rent a Pugs.

  10. #10
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    tell me more about the brevet series

    Road bikes only right? what are the routes where do I sign up?

  11. #11
    Mr.Secret
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    Quote Originally Posted by daveIT
    Aw...I was gonna rent a Pugs.
    I'll loan you my Thunderwing
    ...think we'll ever get outta' this world alive ?...

  12. #12
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    200K Course is in Primo Condition...For a Snow Machine!

    OK, I just got back from 2 hours of snowblowin' the Eagle River to Eklutna portion of the 200K course. I think I got just under 3 miles done. So...It's gonna take me a while. I gotta refuel and head back out. I think the hills back to the Eagle River Nature Center and back are really going to be tough, but I'm looking at it as a form of conditioning.

    I'm just laughing at these conditions! What else CAN I do?!

    So, when we DO start the brevet season, anything is game, as long as it's human powered. Leebikes, you asked if brevets are only for roadbikes? Road-type bikes are probably your best choice, but I've seen people do brevets on mtn. bikes too. Recumbents are popular, as are single speeds. And in 2003 there was a guy who did Paris-Brest-Paris (1200K, or 750 miles) on a KICKBIKE!! I don't recommend that. Maybe a kicksled?

    Just remember that since brevets are totally self-supported, qualities such as reliability, comfort, durability, etc. are really important. Don't laugh, but fenders are really appreciated on these long rides. They add a lot of comfort; keep you dry, clean-er.

    You can find maps of the course at www.akcycling.com. I think there's a cue sheet posted there too. Don't worry though, I'll have all that stuff for riders at the start. I'll have info for the 300K, 400K, and 600K posted shortly.

    Let me know if you have any more questions, or if you want more info on randonneuring. I'd be happy to answer 'em. PM me if you want.
    Kevin Turinsky
    RUSA RBA - Alaska
    www.rusa.org
    http://alaskarandonneurs.blogspot.com

  13. #13
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    Guess I'll have to ride ThunderThighs tonight...

    (don't tell her I said that she'll kill me)

  14. #14
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    To paraphrase Bentsen to Quayle...

    I know thunder thighs, and those are no thunder thighs.


    ____________________________________________
    microcephaly - because a little head is better than no head at all

  15. #15
    HowtoOverthrowtheSystem
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    Haha! You going to be able to make it over to work on your house or are you snowed in?

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