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  1. #1
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    Tubeless Guardian 2.0

    I couldn't find anything recent via search on this topic, so apologies if this is something that has been covered.

    I am interested in going tubeless on my Guardian 2.0. In the process of researching I noticed the stock Weinmann Disc Bull wheel set was double wall construction. (see picture below) Does anyone have experience with this? What do I need to do to make this a tubeless wheel? My riding buddy thinks I should try inflating the tire without sealant to see if the tire will pop into place.

    Thank you in advanced for the help.

    Civ

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  2. #2
    CoolArrow
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    I believe I've read of someone doing this in this forum. I went Tubeless with the stock wheels on my Hobgoblin using the Gorilla Tape method, described pretty well here (having an air compressor really makes this easier, and a little patience)...

    Tech Tuesday: Gorilla Tape Tubeless Conversion - Pinkbike
    Cool BandolArrow

    Jerry Hazard website

  3. #3
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    It is do-able, however the SB8's are a nightmare (ie didn't happen) to get the bead in place.

    Once I swapped to some Maxxis Ikon's my wife's Guardian went tubeless using clear Gorilla tape with little pain.

    I will add that getting the tape placed just right is very important and does take some care.
    I bike with tires.

  4. #4
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    I just recently went Ghetto tubeless on my Goblin using the method mentioned above. However, I used 1 inch gorilla tape and didn't have any issues. I also ordered some WTB tubeless valve stems with removable cores and used stan no tubes fluid. I don't think I would have been able to do it without a compressor. I used Maxxis Ardent tires, and my tubeless went really well so I'm not sure if you will have a harder time.

    This is what I did: I removed tire/tube/tube strip and cleaned inside of rim with alcohol. I started to apply tape by bending it into a U so that it fit down into the rim, starting a couple inches past the valve hole. I then pulled the tape tight and did my best to get it to drop into the rim evenly. It seemed to center it self better if I just pulled the tape tight against the rim, obviously I had to go slow and sometimes pull the tape back up and restart it in certain spots. Make sure to use one continuous piece of tape and over lap the tape a couple inches. I then took a plastic tire lever and ran it around the tire making sure the tape was pushed down on to the rim really good and removed all air bubbles. I then cut hole for valve stem and pushed it through the tape and tightened down the nut on the valve stem so it was tight (I only used fingers, but made it very tight). I then removed the valve core and used my compressor to inflate the tire. My compressor has a blow gun attachment that fit right up against the valve stem pretty tightly. I then pushed a ton of air through the tire and I could hear the beads popping in place. I did this until I got one side of the tire bead completely set. I then popped one side of the tire off a few inches and pored in the stans no tube fluid. Put tire back together and use the air compressor again to set the bead on the remaining side. Keep in mind once you remove the air compressor you lose all your air bc you have the valve core out. I then put valve core back in and used hand pump to inflate to 65 PSI. I shook the tire/rim around in all directions by hand and then installed on bike and spun my tires for a few mins to try and distribute the stans fluid as best I could. I could see the stans fluid leaking from some of the spoke holes and parts of the beads, but I just let them sit over night. Checked them next morning and PSI had dropped to around 50 PSI, but all seeping of the fluid had stopped. I lowered air pressure and went and enjoyed my tubeless setup.

    Going tubeless is with out a doubt the best upgrade I have done to my bike. I now run my tires at 30PSI front and back (I'm 200 pounds geared up). With tubes I had to run 40 PSI rear and 35PSI front to avoid snake bites. I could probably go even lower PSI, because I haven't came close to feeling a rim strike or getting a blurp, but being that this is a ghetto tubeless setup I don't wanna push my luck.

    My best advice is go into this with some patience, bc it can be a little tricky. When I first attempted this, I didn't know I had 3mm hole in my rear tire and I pored the stans fluid in and air'd the tire up and stans fluid went spraying all over the garage. I then had to remove the tire, clean everything up, patch the tire and start all over again. Just know it will be worth it.

  5. #5
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    Thank you all for the replies! I will post back with results & pictures after I buy the supplies.

    Civ

  6. #6
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    I just did this tonight. It went very smooth and was pretty easy to do by myself.

    1" Gorilla tape
    Valve stems cut from old tubes
    Air compressor
    Stans sealant
    On-One tires (2.4 and 2.25)

  7. #7
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    I attempted tubeless this weekend with my Seeker - stock wheelset with stock Geax AKAs. I taped up the wheels using the gorilla tape method and they came out really nice. I was never able to get the tires to seat or inflate though. I tried every little trick I could find, used stans sealant, soap foam around the outside, using a tube to seal one side, nothing worked. I brought it into the LBS for a tune and just had them try their luck getting the tires to seat and it didn't work out for them either. I think I will try again in the future with some new tubeless ready tires.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CivilianUnknown View Post
    Thank you all for the replies! I will post back with results & pictures after I buy the supplies.

    Civ
    Did you ever do this on the guardian? Worth it?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by hadley.michael View Post
    Did you ever do this on the guardian? Worth it?
    It is always worth it to go tubeless. Less rotational weight with more traction, at much lower pressures.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ul_chicken View Post
    It is always worth it to go tubeless. Less rotational weight with more traction, at much lower pressures.
    Let me rephrase, because in a vacuum, I agree with you; however, given the entry level position of both the guardian and myself, combined with the types of rides that the bike is capable of, has going tubeless materially increased either a) your ability or b) your enjoyment of those same types of rides on the guardian, specifically?

  11. #11
    CoolArrow
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    Regardless of ability or type of ride, tubeless has given me peace of mind on any given ride that I won't snakebike or otherwise pinchflat, at least on 99% of my rides.

    That peace of mind is a huge factor in enjoying a ride, whether you're downhilling, freeriding, commuting or just tooling around the block.
    Cool BandolArrow

    Jerry Hazard website

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhazard View Post
    That peace of mind is a huge factor in enjoying a ride, whether you're downhilling, freeriding, commuting or just tooling around the block.
    Good call. . . with the new bike and only about 10 rides under my belt, I've yet to experience the joys of a flat, but definitely a valid piece of input, as it's only a matter of time. Per the other thread (guardian tire swap), and talks about traction, I'm on board swapping to different tires/going tubeless, but I do like to hear people explain more specifically how something has made a difference from their own perspectives.

  13. #13
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    Well, on my second ride ever on my Goblin, I pinch flatted. I hadn't ordered a spare tube yet, so all I had was a patch kit and a frame pump.

    I got no less than 15 mosquito bites, a few chiggers, and one tick while squatting down off to the side of the trail to patch the tube (in two spots because of the pinch flat) and use that tiny pump to put air back in the tire. At least one of the patches didn't seal right and I had to stop two more times on the shortest route back out of the trail to put air in the tire. Letting it get too low before stopping again granted me with another pinch flat... I had to walk my bike for about a mile - more mosquito bites/chiggers...

    I went tubeless before the next ride (I still carry a spare tube).

    I notice the lower pressure helping keep me from spinning my back tire on roots and rocks going up steep technical climbs where a little more skill and fitness would grant me the speed to make it up before the tire had a chance to spin, but not having that yet, the lower pressures have kept me from walking my bike in a lot of places I would have before.

    I also haven't had to stop to put air in or fix a flat on the trail yet. I'll do whatever I can to prevent that amount of itching from ever happening again!

  14. #14
    CoolArrow
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    Quote Originally Posted by hadley.michael View Post
    Good call. . . with the new bike and only about 10 rides under my belt, I've yet to experience the joys of a flat, but definitely a valid piece of input, as it's only a matter of time. Per the other thread (guardian tire swap), and talks about traction, I'm on board swapping to different tires/going tubeless, but I do like to hear people explain more specifically how something has made a difference from their own perspectives.
    Absolutely. My only point is that its not only a performance issue.

    I ride my tires at higher pressures than most would think reasonable, but I have my own reason/ideas about that - not the time or place to go in to here. Where I live, it just makes sense, but that may not apply to everywhere.
    Cool BandolArrow

    Jerry Hazard website

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