Goblin Replacement Tires- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Goblin Replacement Tires

    My Geax AKAs are starting to show some wear at nearly 200 miles and I'm starting to think about replacement rubber. I see many posts here indicating significant weight savings can be made with a change to folding tires. However, As a noob to MTB, I'm kinda confused on the whole tubeless situation and if it would really benefit me. I understand the benefits for trail usage (lower pressure = more grip) and better grip in the dirt is certainly appealing. On the other hand, I spend more of my miles riding to/from local trails on the road where low rolling resistance is a benefit.

    Am I better off sticking with tubes and finding a lighter folding tire that has a more aggressive tread for the dirt? Or does tubeless still make sense when I'm doing 30 miles a week on the road?

    Also, how often does the sealing fluid (or whatever the correct terminology) need replaced/refreshed in a tubeless tire?

    Thanks,
    Chris

  2. #2
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    There is always a benefit to going tubeless, and losing those two tubes saves a lot of rotational weight, so it is much, much easier to get the bike going. Even though you are roading it, you probably won't notice that you are running less pressures with that weight loss. Only downside to road riding with new rubber is you will wear your tires much faster, and having knobbies will cause road noise. I say go for it, besides, you will find it is much easier to mount and dismount a folding bead versus wire bead. As far as adding Stans juice, once every three months is suggested, but you can hear it slosh around when you shake or spin the wheel. Add it when you need to. Good luck!

  3. #3
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    Go tubeless! For me I got tired of changing flats every other ride. Weight benefit is a plus, lower psi also a plus. The benefits far outweigh the cons. I used 1in gorilla tape to seal the rim up and have been running a 2.35 Noby Nic in the front and 2.2 Ardent race in the rear with stellar results on medium packed desert trails.

  4. #4
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    I've not gone tubeless yet but noticed the same results on the stock AKA's at around 300 miles (mostly dirt) and at ~450 miles the center tread was pretty much worn down and the knobs on either side were beginning to wear. I went with a Maxxis Ardent on the rear and a High Roller on the front and I really like the way the bike feels. Rolls great and seems to have much better grip.

  5. #5
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    I've run Small Block 8's (amazing in the dry) GEAX AKA's and Maxxis Ikons. The Ikons are a fantastic tire!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ul_chicken View Post
    There is always a benefit to going tubeless, and losing those two tubes saves a lot of rotational weight, so it is much, much easier to get the bike going. Even though you are roading it, you probably won't notice that you are running less pressures with that weight loss. Only downside to road riding with new rubber is you will wear your tires much faster, and having knobbies will cause road noise. I say go for it, besides, you will find it is much easier to mount and dismount a folding bead versus wire bead. As far as adding Stans juice, once every three months is suggested, but you can hear it slosh around when you shake or spin the wheel. Add it when you need to. Good luck!
    I thought I remember watching a vid that showed going tubeless increased the weight? Let me find it, I think it was tested on a road tire but maybe still applicable?

    Point of interest: 0:57


    Note: He does change the tire to a tubeless one so maybe people don't find that necessary. Also, there may be very light tubeless tires, I don't know.

    I also read it's much easier to get the bike going but most times I see people mention going to lower psi for traction after achieving tubeless. Wouldn't lowering the PSI increase rolling resistance, rendering this facet of the gain void? Maybe it's different for road and Mtb tires because of the knobs and terrain but I wonder? I also thought keeping the tube and using stans on it instead would make for a less messy maintenance tire when removing it. If no tubes have a removable core you could just inject the liquid with a syringe? Not something I would want to do but its purpose is to seal so why not?
    Airborne Goblin Evo

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by NekoPlasmid View Post
    I thought I remember watching a vid that showed going tubeless increased the weight? Let me find it, I think it was tested on a road tire but maybe still applicable?

    I also read it's much easier to get the bike going but most times I see people mention going to lower psi for traction after achieving tubeless. Wouldn't lowering the PSI increase rolling resistance, rendering this facet of the gain void? Maybe it's different for road and Mtb tires because of the knobs and terrain but I wonder? I also thought keeping the tube and using stans on it instead would make for a less messy maintenance tire when removing it. If no tubes have a removable core you could just inject the liquid with a syringe? Not something I would want to do but its purpose is to seal so why not?
    Each tube, depending on it's composition (thorn resistant, regular, butyl, or latex) is going to weigh around anywhere from a half a pound to a pound, especially if slimed. With a tubeless setup, you only add one round of tape and 2oz. of Stans per wheel, so you can see why it is feasible to lose up to a pound and a half in rotational weight in a wheelset. Trust me, when you get on the bike after converting, you will be amazed at the difference going tubeless makes.

    Here is an article discussing the rolling resistance - tubes vs. no tubes, and just about every tire company have done their own tests for rolling resistance - your tire choice will have an impact on this as well.

    As far as having a mess while changing a tire, that can happen, but there are easy ways around that. If you have a Glad sandwich container, simply set the wheel in the container, pop one side of the bead all the way around, push the bead into the container, and the Stans flows into the container. After you finish up with whatever you had to do, use a syringe or a Stans 2oz bottle and retrieve the Stans juice, and inject it back into the valve stem with the removable core taken out. Rinse out the container for next time. If you go to the LBS, I am sure they have 2oz bottles of Stans for sale, which will barely fit into the valve stem, with no syringe needed to inject it - which is what I do.

  8. #8
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    Sweet link mate, nice graph lol. The 2oz bottle is what came with my bike and what I plan to use going forward also. Wouldn't using the syringe to remove the stans from the tire directly be better then adding a container to the process?

    What do you know about installing the rear tire backwards on purpose?

    Thanks.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NekoPlasmid View Post
    Sweet link mate, nice graph lol. The 2oz bottle is what came with my bike and what I plan to use going forward also. Wouldn't using the syringe to remove the stans from the tire directly be better then adding a container to the process?

    What do you know about installing the rear tire backwards on purpose?

    Thanks.
    I used the container due to the fact I didn't have a syringe - had to improvise - and yes, you could use the syringe to do the same thing. Either way, it isn't much of a pain if you have to remove a tire for any reason.
    I run Maxxis Ardent up front reversed, and a Maxxis Ignitor in the rear reversed as well. I am a big fan of running the tread backwards, even though it is much harder on the tire, more road noise, adds a slight amount of rolling resistance, but having the extra traction for climbing and obstacle clearance is completely worth it. The last Ignitor tire I replaced lasted a full year and then some, and is now a race tire as it is almost at the end of the sipe marks.

  10. #10
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    I wonder, maybe making some type of lightweight liquid foam that can be injected into the tire from the valve and then expands can be developed?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by NekoPlasmid View Post
    I wonder, maybe making some type of lightweight liquid foam that can be injected into the tire from the valve and then expands can be developed?

    Because they means set for one specific rider, 1 tire, etc. Can't set your pressures where you want, can't adjust pressures based on rider weight, etc. Might be good for roadies and hybrids but trash for mountain bike use. And at that, they make foam inserts that replace the tubes, no air needed. But heavy as hell and pointless unless you small and lightweight.

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