Continuous Cable Housing- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Continuous Cable Housing

    I am thinking about drilling out the cable stops on the drive side of the Goblin, so that I can run one continuous cable housing to the rear derailleur. I think it would look a lot cleaner and also stop mud and water from entering the cable housing. I ride in the south east and my bike stays covered in mud and water. Though, it would be mainly for the looks I guess.

    Besides voiding the warranty, anybody have any thoughts on this?

  2. #2
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    My concern would be breaking the cable stop itself, but I think if you are careful, you should be OK. What kind of cable are you using now?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ul_chicken View Post
    My concern would be breaking the cable stop itself, but I think if you are careful, you should be OK. What kind of cable are you using now?
    I double checked the routing on the Goblin and wonder why?... I guess if you like the look but the routing is actually fairly keep-dirt-out-friendly compared to other routings on the market. Remember that once you put full housing on there is additional drag from the extended housing. Also, once water and dirt get in it does not come out. I have found I replace cables/housing more often on people's bikes that run full housing than interrupted housing. Just my own 2 cents.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ul_chicken View Post
    My concern would be breaking the cable stop itself, but I think if you are careful, you should be OK. What kind of cable are you using now?
    I've still got the stock cables on right now. I was planning on shortening my cables and that got me thinking about just running one continuous housing to clean things up. After some searching I found a couple threads on MTBR where people have done it with success. I think I'm gonna go ahead and do it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSDSav View Post
    I double checked the routing on the Goblin and wonder why?... I guess if you like the look but the routing is actually fairly keep-dirt-out-friendly compared to other routings on the market. Remember that once you put full housing on there is additional drag from the extended housing. Also, once water and dirt get in it does not come out. I have found I replace cables/housing more often on people's bikes that run full housing than interrupted housing. Just my own 2 cents.
    Yea, I had wondered about the additional drag. I was thinking the higher end bikes that have the internally routed cabling use one continuous housing, but maybe I'm wrong.

  6. #6
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    They do, make sure you get really nice cables and housing. Even if you read reviews about high end bikes they will mention about how the routing and long housing seemed to hamper the shifting slightly. They do it mainly on dual suspension due to nature of the moving rear triangle they can't really have the stops when the suspension compresses the length changes. If you have full housing the length never changes, always X inches long. I have never been a fan of internal cable routing either... Again years of being a mechanic and cursing when the cable doesn't want to feed through right and sitting there with a flash light... I digress

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSDSav View Post
    They do, make sure you get really nice cables and housing. Even if you read reviews about high end bikes they will mention about how the routing and long housing seemed to hamper the shifting slightly. They do it mainly on dual suspension due to nature of the moving rear triangle they can't really have the stops when the suspension compresses the length changes. If you have full housing the length never changes, always X inches long. I have never been a fan of internal cable routing either... Again years of being a mechanic and cursing when the cable doesn't want to feed through right and sitting there with a flash light... I digress
    What brand of cabling and housing do you guys recommend?

  8. #8
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    Something with a liner. Jagwire makes a nice sealed kit out there. Obviously stainless cables. Shimano Sil-Tec is nice, had a few runs with them and they seemed nice but I usually like a bigger sample size before I really have an opinion, but it is Shimano and they generally make great products.

  9. #9
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    Also you can run the housing along beside the guides before you drill. Zip tie it along but not too tight. Take a couple runs to make sure you like it. Then you can clip the zip (see what I did there... ) and drill away. Once drilled there is no real going back.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSDSav View Post
    Also you can run the housing along beside the guides before you drill. Zip tie it along but not too tight. Take a couple runs to make sure you like it. Then you can clip the zip (see what I did there... ) and drill away. Once drilled there is no real going back.
    Yea, thats a good idea.

  11. #11
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    Why don't you try one of these:





    That way you do not have to make any frame modifications.

    Bike Hydraulic Brake Lines and Fittings
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  12. #12
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    eff - thanks for the links.

    Do the cable ferrules come crimped on the housing from the factory? I can't remove the ferrules, even when using pliers.

  13. #13
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    I found a good way of removing stuck ferrules. Take an adjustable wrench and put it past the ferrule and close it to the diameter of the cable housing. Then pull the cable back through and then only the ferrule hangs on the wrench and it will come off with some pulling. I just switched to the raceface 1x10 setup and removed my front derailleur and cabling.

    Are cable housing usually this rusted after 6 months of riding? This is the first time I've removed any cabling since I purchased the bike.

    Continuous Cable Housing-2015-01-15-18.37.29.jpg

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=TMO8853;11706082]I found a good way of removing stuck ferrules. Take an adjustable wrench and put it past the ferrule and close it to the diameter of the cable housing. Then pull the cable back through and then only the ferrule hangs on the wrench and it will come off with some pulling. I just switched to the raceface 1x10 setup and removed my front derailleur and cabling.

    Are cable housing usually this rusted after 6 months of riding? This is the first time I've removed any cabling since I purchased the bike.

    I have seen that before in fairly new bikes. Depends on some riding conditions and looks like part of the outer coating is stripped away with an exposed end. No real big deal, I would pry add a little extra lube in that housing and see if it is pulling smooth. In the past I was very OCD and replaced all my cables and housing atleast once a year, if not twice. I don't do it as often any more, it really does not need it that much, I was just a little over zealous.

  15. #15
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    I didn't even noticed that at first. Your right, the housing is stripped away exposing the metal. That makes sense. This was my front derailleur cable I removed because I switched to 1x10 setup. It never gave me any problems with shifting while it was on the bike though.

  16. #16
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    RSDSav: What do you think of the cable lubes that are on the market? Thanks for being a resource on here!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeinMinn View Post
    RSDSav: What do you think of the cable lubes that are on the market? Thanks for being a resource on here!
    Cable lubes are good. I have used many of the chain lubes for years without problem as well. Something light like TriFlow, or any teflon like based lubes. I have had wax based lubes gum up the housing a little over time. I generally use TriFlow since I can find it in a dripper bottle that is easy to get into the housing. They usually come with a little tube extension that you can put directly into the housing. If you use high end lined housings you probably don't have to lube them, atleast in the beginning. I honestly use a good mid level housing, like a jagwire or shimano, without lining most of the time and lube it. I hope this helps and I am not rambling too much. I am always happy to help if I can.

  18. #18
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    I installed continuous housing on the Goblin this weekend. When I first got my bike I had a shop called Bike Street USA try and fix some shifting problems I was having. They installed a new cable housing and put these huge bends in the housing near the derailleur and the chain stay. The shifting worked, but it has always seemed like something wasn't right. Previously, I would have to push the shift lever and hold the lever until the shift was complete. Also, the shift up lever had so much resistance there were times that my thumb would get tired from pushing the lever. Then when I would down shift it would hesitate and then shift down like it was sticking.

    I doubt the continuous cable housing did this, but now that I've re did my cable and cable housing I can't believe the difference it made. The shift up lever now takes the least amount of pressure to change the gears and now I just push the up shifter / release and it immediately shifts on its own. Same with down shifting, its so much faster now.

    Drilling was easy using a dremel attachment and then I hit is was some touch up paint. You can't find a scratch anywhere. I'm waiting on some compression olives and hose barbs to arrive and then I'll shorten both brake cables.


    Continuous Cable Housing-2015-02-23-19.17.21.jpg
    Continuous Cable Housing-2015-02-23-19.17.57.jpgContinuous Cable Housing-2015-02-23-19.18.33.jpgContinuous Cable Housing-2015-02-23-19.18.45.jpg
    Last edited by TMO8853; 02-24-2015 at 11:16 AM.

  19. #19
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    Looking good!! Seeing your bike only makes me wish I still had a black frame!

  20. #20
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    Shimano required more of a loop in the housing at the back but SRAM is more of a direct routing into the stop on the derailleur. They may have incorrectly routed cable like a Shimano and had too much housing and a big bend. Good to see you cleaned it up and it is shifting great!

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