Airborne Guardian vs. Scott Aspect 29 Tour vs Trek Wahoo- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Airborne Guardian vs. Scott Aspect 29 Tour vs Trek Wahoo

    Those all fall into my price range for my first bike of around $600. Which do you feel is the better buy?

  2. #2
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    The Scott and Trek are almost identical spec-wise so if it were between those two it would just be a matter of what you like better and what looks prettier.

    I am not familiar with the Airborne but I believe their specs are comparable to the other two. So as with the other two, what suits you best and what looks best.

    However the Trek and Scott both have mechanical disc brakes, but the Airborne has hydraulic brakes. In that price range you are probably getting a little bit better mechanical disc brakes than the hydraulic disc brakes.

  3. #3
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    I'm not even sure what hydraulic brakes are or how they work.

  4. #4
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    Hydraulic = fluid, the same as in your car (if you have one)


    However it seems that the brakes on the Trek are not getting good reviews and that the hydraulics are.

    The mechanical on the Scott must be new because I haven't found any reviews about them.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/brake-time/te...la-563188.html
    TekTro Auriga Series Disc Brake System Reviews

  5. #5
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    So i'm guessing I should eliminate the Trek?

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    You should try them out and see what feels best. If the Trek suits you best you maybe could ask to upgrade the brakes or something if that turns out to be the only thing that bothers you.

    However, the brakes might be just good enough for you. You have to consider that other people make different demands of their components compared to yours. You can always upgrade something later rather than having to buy a completely new bike because the frame doesn't suit you.

    I have never been near any of the bikes you mentioned so I have no idea what I would pick.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 101Surge View Post
    So i'm guessing I should eliminate the Trek?
    I have a 2012 Trek Wahoo 29er and its disc brakes work quite well. I upgraded its crankset, as I wanted 175mm crank arm lengths as well as taller and shorter gearing provided by the new chainrings 44/32/22. The OEM was a Shimano FC-M171 42/34/24 170mm crankset. I have no regrets.

  8. #8
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    With a better Fork with lockout and hydraulic brakes the Guardian is a better buy in itself. I ordered my Airborne Guardian last Sunday. It will be here Saturday.

  9. #9
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    I'd go Airborne, looks like the better buy.
    Climb into the sky, never wonder why - Tailgunner
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  10. #10
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    First post, but I've done a lot of research and I've test ridden about 13-14 29ers ranging from 600$ to 3700$ (carbon models of bikes I was looking at around the 1000$ level to test geometry).

    I rode a Scott Scale 29 when I was looking at the Comp (899$). I rode the Trek Mamba (can find it for 879$), and I liked the Mamba a bit better. The Mamba has the same frame as the 679$ Marlin, which is very close to your price range, and the component level seems to be a little bit of a set up from the Wahoo you are looking at. One guy at the shop told me that the frame on the Wahoo was different than the Marlin/Mamba/Cobia, but I'm not sure.

    The Airborne Guardian has X5 rear D and shifters (a step up from the Marlin, and around 2 steps up from the Wahoo). The fork on the Guardian is a step or two up from the Marlin (and one step below the XC32 on the Trek Mamba).

    The Airborne Guardian is a 3x9 setup, while the Wahoo and the Aspect 29 Tour are both 3x8 setups. The Guardian has hydraulic brakes vs the mechanicals on the other two.

    I'm a bigger rider, and my last bike (which I sold when I had kids and didn't have time to ride) was a dual suspension Specialized FSR XC that was XT'd out. I bent an LX cassette "just riding along", IIRC, so I was kinda worried about some components when I test rode the 679$ Trek Marlin. For many riders, it would be plenty, but the brakes definitely felt weak compared to the hydraulics on the Mamba.

    My search, after a few months of test riding and lots of research, came down to a Trek Mamba or a Felt Nine Sport, each around the 1000$ range, each able to be had for a little less. The 1149$ Airborne Goblin (which has the same frame as the Guardian) seems to be well regarded, but was a bit out of my range. The weekend I went to buy one of those two, Airborne announced the Guardian pre-order. I wound up going with the Guardian.

    Now... a couple things. The Airborne comes with good customer service via e-mail and phone, but you have to put it together to some degree. It's really not hard at all, take about 20-30 minutes (much of that due to the extensive packaging methods). The components are set up reasonably well, but you may have to do a few adjustments. If you buy the Scott or the Trek, the shop will take care of that, and there will probably be a free adjustment after things settle in a month or so.

    Test ride both of the bikes you can find locally, and see which feels best. If the thought of the bike shop support is more comforting than the thought of tuning up your own bike there's a lot to be said for that. If you're perfectly happy tweaking your new toy, the Guardian is a great deal, and is comparable to the 900-1000$ bikes you'd find in the shop.

    **BRENT**

  11. #11
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    I've haven't had a bike since I was 12 or13, and those were prebuilt walmart bikes. Not sure what i'm getting into if I go the guardian route and try to do everything myself.

  12. #12
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    Youtube is your friend. Their are videos on how to do anything for the bike. It is not hard and does not really take a lot of time.

  13. #13
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    Looking at the Guardian myself, anyone care to post their reviews of it would be greatly appreciated.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by steeleshark2 View Post
    With a better Fork with lockout and hydraulic brakes the Guardian is a better buy in itself. I ordered my Airborne Guardian last Sunday. It will be here Saturday.
    stelshark2 - how do you like the airborne? I just found out about it today and it's now on my short list....

  15. #15
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    looking just a little bit beyond the price, i also suggest fitting out and trying out all three bikes (if possible). the fit, feel and look are some aspects that only you can decide and something that price can't really dictate.

    personally, i have a 2012 wahoo. got it late march of this year, have about 800km on it (mostly pavement and gutter jumping, some abusive trail riding every now and then). already replaced rear brake cable but that's more due to rust and negligence (i guess) on my part. overall, i'm happy with the bike. i was considering either this, the marlin, or the GT equivalent 29er...i forget the name...

    again i do suggest that you try them all out first. and lastly, once you have made your purchase, stick with it don't go beating yourself up over what you should have or could have done. best you enjoy the ride you have and perhaps look to the future for something should you want to replace it then

    happy riding!
    we all fall short of glory, so let's just be respectful and ride!

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