WTB All Terrain 700 x 32 or 700 x 37 replace Schwalbe Rapid Rob 29x2.1 Giant Talon?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    WTB All Terrain 700 x 32 or 700 x 37 replace Schwalbe Rapid Rob 29x2.1 Giant Talon?

    I am totally confused about the 700 series tires that pop up on the Performance Bicycle website under 29" Tires.
    I have a Giant Talon with Schwalbe Rapid Rob 29x2.1 tires.
    Can WTB All Terrain 700 x 32 or 700 x 37 replace these tires? If so which size would be closest?

    Thank you in advance 10 mph

  2. #2
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    700c and 29" tires have the same ISO (diameter) so they are interchangeable in that respect. As far as widths- https://www.google.com/search?q=mm+t...hrome&ie=UTF-8


    so yes, you could replace your tires with those but the ride would be very different.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  3. #3
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    a 37mm tire is only a 1.5 tire, so way to small coming from a 2.1.

    a 2.1 is 53mm

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outhouse View Post
    a 37mm tire is only a 1.5 tire, so way to small coming from a 2.1

    That depends on what you want to do with the bike.
    I brake for stinkbugs

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    that's why I am confused

    WRT to the conversion,

    37 mm = 1.45669 inches which is not 2.2o inches?

    or do you mean
    700 mm= 27.5591

  6. #6
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    Yes, a 37mm tire is narrower than a 2.2" one. A 60mm tire would be wider.
    I brake for stinkbugs

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    thanks

  8. #8
    jrm
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    Depends on the inside rim width

    Just guessing but id think a 32c wouldnt be doable but the 37 might be. the Nano 40c would be a better tire. Having ridden those ATs in the past there heavy and roll pretty slow..but they are cheap if thats what youre after..

  9. #9
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    Thanks every one. Sometimes new bike owners stay new.

    Last year I mounted 3 tubes on my daughter's bike and they went flat the next day. I thought ,maybe the tubes were defective. Turns out I was mounting 24" tubes on 26" tires...( in all honesty I am a very good at fixing cars)

    I'm just learning about the different bike tires ( folding tires?) and the tubeless concept.If I don't size my tires right I can just see myself spewing gallons of tire sealer over the garage because my tire was not wide enough.

    I'll just stick with tires that do not use the 700 scheme. There are plenty of sites out there that stick to the 29 inch 2.1 29 inch 2.25 nomenclature. Add to all this , the tubeless tire concept which I am just learning about.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10mph View Post
    Last year I mounted 3 tubes on my daughter's bike and they went flat the next day. I thought ,maybe the tubes were defective. Turns out I was mounting 24" tubes on 26" tires...
    Side comment, you should be able stretch 24in tubes to fit 26in wheels. I am running 18in tubes in my 20in BMX. I know some people who run 16in tubes in 20in.
    Ragley Big Wig, Sunday Soundwave (BMX), 91 Schwinn High Plain (single speed "gravel" bike), Nashbar CXSS (on trainer)

  11. #11
    jrm
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    Just make sure your rims are tubeless ready and are welded and have no seams and be real careful of your rim tape job. This should take some of the guess work out of it..

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93EXCivic View Post
    I know some people who run 16in tubes in 20in.


    Why?
    I brake for stinkbugs

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Why?
    Less rotating weight

    Seeing some start to use those Tubolito tubes instead now.
    Ragley Big Wig, Sunday Soundwave (BMX), 91 Schwinn High Plain (single speed "gravel" bike), Nashbar CXSS (on trainer)

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10mph View Post
    I'll just stick with tires that do not use the 700 scheme. There are plenty of sites out there that stick to the 29 inch 2.1 29 inch 2.25 nomenclature. Add to all this , the tubeless tire concept which I am just learning about.
    700C tires and 29" tires are nominal sizes. there is, somewhere in the time and space, a 700B and 700A tire, but those are no longer used. 700C nominal designation for the precent standard for rim diameters that has been around for decades. both 700C and 29" tires fit a 622mm bead diameter rim. "700C" is usually used for road (pavement, cyclocross, or gravel oriented) and hybrid bikes. when the same rim diameter, but typically with a wider rim is used on mountain bike, that is called a 29er because that's how they were marketed in around the turn of the (current) century. theoretically, 700C and 29" tires can fit on the same rim, but riding a skinny road tire on a modern 30mm+ mountain bike rim, or a 2.4" wide mtn tire on a skinny 19mm road rim will not result in a great ride experience.

    If you want to put 700C tires on your bike, you can. they will fit your wheels if you have a 29er bike. but they will probably be narrower than what you want for your bike. anything larger than 700C 50mm is usually labeled "29er." it's not any more complicated than that.

    to replace a tire that is labeled 29x2.1, it depends on how you're using the bike. if you're keeping the bike on very smooth trails and roads only, a 700C 38mm or up to 45mm tire should be fine. the tire will most likely be lighter and faster-rolling than a mountain bike tire. if you want to ride trails where traction is important, you probably want at least a 29x2.1 tire, if not larger. the upper size limit will depend on what will fit in your frame.

    Quote Originally Posted by 10mph View Post
    Last year I mounted 3 tubes on my daughter's bike and they went flat the next day. I thought ,maybe the tubes were defective. Turns out I was mounting 24" tubes on 26" tires...( in all honesty I am a very good at fixing cars)
    many people use smaller tubes than what was intended for their tire. a tube for a 29x2.4 tire is quite bulky for someone trying to minimize the amount of gear they are carrying around, so a 24" or 26" tube saves some space in your pack. if you tried to put 24" tubes in 26" tires and they went flat, either you damaged them during installation or there's a sharp object imbedded in the tire that you missed.

    Quote Originally Posted by 10mph View Post
    I'm just learning about the different bike tires ( folding tires?) and the tubeless concept.If I don't size my tires right I can just see myself spewing gallons of tire sealer over the garage because my tire was not wide enough.
    tubeless is not hard if you have:
    1. a rim that is was designed to be set up tubeless with tape sealing the holes on the rim. most bikes in the past few years come with tubeless-ready rims and tape. if your rims were not designed for tubeless use, you might be able to make them work with layers of tape or special rim strips. some people have success with splitting open an undersized tube and using that as a sealing rim strip aka "ghetto tubeless".
    2. a tubeless ready tire, which is MOST mountain bike tires these days. it may work with a non-tubeless tire as well but I have not tried.
    3. tubeless valves. these are just valves like the ones that are molded onto tubes but with a thick rubber grommet on the end to seal up inside the tire/rim. you can make your own by cutting up and old tube but these have not worked as well for me. tubeless valves are pretty cheap and the DIY ones have not been a good option IME.
    4. tubeless sealant. there are endless discussions on what works, but it has be to designed for tubeless tires. (not regular Slime or Fix-A-Flat.)

    the inner diameter ring that is in most tires is made from metal wires called a "wire bead tire." they are stiff and weigh a bit more. tires with an inner diameter ring made from a more flexible material are generally lighter and more supple and are referred to as "folding bead" tires. most, if not all, nicer tires have a folding bead. wire bead tires might work well for tubeless, but all of the tubeless-ready tires I've seen have a folding bead.

    you can put a tube in a tubeless tire/ rim. many riders with tubeless tires carry a spare tube, even though their tires are tubeless and contain sealant so they can limp out of the trail in the event of catastrophic tire damage where a tubeless setup cannot hold air.

  15. #15
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    Thanks Mack Turtle..

    I've actually been using my Giant Talon as a safe version of a "rough road" bike. Its not a heavy bike, maybe 29 pounds. It runs well and it takes branches, potholes ruts and uneven pavement safely -the kind of stuff you see at the last second on the side of a busy road, and cant avoid because of traffic well. I'm thinking my old 26" bike might been a bit unstable in those situations and tossed me.
    The trails I ride on are not that muddy and I've seen riders with skinny road bike tires on them.
    Its interesting that I can use 700C 38 to 45 mm tires because I don't want to go at 2.10" plus, I'd like to get down to 1.90". I'm just hoping they will seal. Of course I could use tubes?

  16. #16
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    There are lot's of good 700x50 options available.
    Unfortunately I don't believe your Talon has tubeless rims, so I think you will have to stick with tubes.

  17. #17
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    Thanks everyone.Its been a lot of fun owning this bike.
    When I first had I drove it like it was a Unicycle, the large wheel size just threw me. Thought I would tip over. Thought everyone was staring at me.
    Four weeks later it fits like a glove and you don't "see" the size anymore.
    I'm still using the Schwalbe Rapid Roys it came with. They are really worn down bu they are fine with me. In fact they are great -- they force me to learn how to handle the bike better. Saw another 29 er the other day with monster tires on it --it looked like a mini van--and I thought I'm glad I waited to pick mine.
    I don't want this bike to be a Pick Up truck. I want it to be agile and athletic It handles really well! and its fast
    I'll probably go with a slightly knobby 2.0 or 2. 1 in front for traction and a 2.1 road tire in the back. Only caveat is out here in the Pacific Northwest it rains like ^&*() starting next month. That's when I am buying my tires..

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