What pressure for 2.4 rear and 2.6 front Maxxis Rekon's- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What pressure for 2.4 rear and 2.6 front Maxxis Rekon's

    I weigh 175 geared up and the tires are tubeless. The rims have an 30mm inner width.

    I've been riding them for a year at about 15 psi front and 18 psi rear and they seem fine for the mountain trail riding that I do. My bike pump is hard to read and probably not accurate at these low pressures so I am getting an Accu-Gauge 0-30 psi gauge so that I can fine tune ideal pressures but I am wondering what I should look for when riding.

    I think ideal is enough pressure so that it doesn't feel like the tires are bending laterally in hard turns like a soft pair of snow skis. I don't corner very hard on my bike so that will be an easy test to pass. I also believe that softer is faster. Is there a limit to this?

    The trails here are quite varied with hardpack, gravel, pine needles and occasional mud.

    Thanks for any advice!

  2. #2
    WillWorkForTrail
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    The thing to do is use your pump to put the tires where you normally ride, and then use the new gauge to see what that is. Let that be your baseline and adjust from there. I think you've nailed it with lower is better until the point where the tire rolls out from under you when you're cornering. As such, I ran 24 PSI up front and 25 PSI in the rear when I had 2.6 Rekons on both ends of the bike. Keep in mind, that rear pressure is the roll point in turns - the front pressure is to keep the rim off all the rocks and roots on the trails I frequent - so a little different requirement there. Also, I weigh about 220 before I add water to the mix. So again, you best bet is start with what you've been doing, and adjust from there.

  3. #3
    I am Walt
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    FWIW, I measure my PSI meticulously with an Accu-Gauge before every ride. Iíve been running 2.4 Rekon WTís on 30mm ID rims (on my SB100) and settled on 17 f/22 r. Iím 183 before gearing up.

    I have previously run 2.6 Rekons on 29mm ID rims, and ran 15/16 f and 19 r.

    Most people run (way) too much PSI, IMO...


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  4. #4
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    I lower the pressure until sensing something untoward, like distinct squirm or rim strikes, then go up a few psi. I find a notable improvement in traction and ride smoothness going as low as I can get away with. I might boost it a few psi for riding sharp-edged chunky stuff. My usual is 14f/16r on 29r 2.4" tires, 29mm iw rims, at 180 lb.
    What, me worry?

  5. #5
    I am Walt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    I lower the pressure until sensing something untoward, like distinct squirm or rim strikes, then go up a few psi. I find a notable improvement in traction and ride smoothness going as low as I can get away with. I might boost it a few psi for riding sharp-edged chunky stuff. My usual is 14f/16r on 29r 2.4" tires, 29mm iw rims, at 180 lb.
    ^^This!


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  6. #6
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    I agree. I'm 160 lbs and run about 16psi rear, 12psi front on something like a 29x2.5 Aggressor rear/29x2.6 DHF front. For the 29x2.4 Rekon I was running 17.5 (just where it ended up by chance, after reducing pressure on a ride) for the rear, but may try 16 for that as well.
    Those pressures seem to get me to a point where the side knobs on most tires just barely touch the ground, on my driveway when I'm seated on the bike. Haven't had any squirm.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    Thanks for the data points!

  8. #8
    WillWorkForTrail
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    Man, I wish I knew how y'all get pressures so low without the tires squirming in turns.

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by dugt View Post
    Thanks for the data points!
    What everybody else runs are just points of information that are a little bit useful. Everybody is different, rides different bikes on different terrain.

    What YOU need to do to find what pressure you should use is stop reading everybody else's comments and go experiment. "If in doubt, let it out." Basically, that means if you're not experiencing negatives like tire squirm or rim strikes, let some air out. If you start to experience those things, then put more air back in. Simple.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    Man, I wish I knew how y'all get pressures so low without the tires squirming in turns.
    Well, tire size is a very important part of that. The more air volume, the lower the pressure reading on the gauge will provide when you have a tire that feels good to you, if you compare it to a narrower tire at a similar point. I use a higher pressure in 2.35 tires than I do in 2.6 tires, in which I put a higher pressure than I do for 3.8 tires.

    Casing stiffness makes a difference, too. Stiffer sidewalls/burlier casing tires get a lower pressure than those with a really supple casing.

    Count me as another who is using about 12f and 16.5r on 2.6 tires with moderately stiff casings. I ding the rear occasionally in chunky stuff, but I use tire inserts to address that. I don't get sidewall squirm at those pressures, but below that I do, and I weighed around 175 before this covid crap hit.

  10. #10
    WillWorkForTrail
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Well, tire size is a very important part of that. The more air volume, the lower the pressure reading on the gauge will provide when you have a tire that feels good to you, if you compare it to a narrower tire at a similar point. I use a higher pressure in 2.35 tires than I do in 2.6 tires, in which I put a higher pressure than I do for 3.8 tires.

    Casing stiffness makes a difference, too. Stiffer sidewalls/burlier casing tires get a lower pressure than those with a really supple casing.

    Count me as another who is using about 12f and 16.5r on 2.6 tires with moderately stiff casings. I ding the rear occasionally in chunky stuff, but I use tire inserts to address that. I don't get sidewall squirm at those pressures, but below that I do, and I weighed around 175 before this covid crap hit.
    Yeah. I'm talking about 2.6 rekons on 30mm internal rims. 24f 25r - any less in the rear and it starts to roll in turns. I weigh 220 before adding water.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    Yeah. I'm talking about 2.6 rekons on 30mm internal rims. 24f 25r - any less in the rear and it starts to roll in turns. I weigh 220 before adding water.
    That seems reasonable. On a good day, I'm 155 (160 in quarantine). My 16 psi at my weight would be about 23 psi at your weight. That's pretty close. Probably within the range of different readings on different gauges.

  12. #12
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    A factor that I think hasn't been mentioned yet is aggressive turning. The faster you corner, the more pressure you need to avoid tire roll in turns. Probably everyone here knows that but no one has mentioned how aggressively they corner. I corner cautiously so I can get away with lower presures in the rear. Also, I go slow or don't go over jagged terrain so I can get a way with a low front tire pressure too. After some testing yesterday I'm at 12 psi front, 2.6 x 29", and 14 psi rear, 2.4 x 29". Both wheels are 30mm id and I weigh 176 lbs.

    I was going to get a 0-30 psi gauge but, because of yesterdays testing, I switched to 0-15 psi. If I ever get more aggressive (bloody unlikely), I'll just use my pumps gauge because it is good above 16 psi.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dugt View Post
    A factor that I think hasn't been mentioned yet is aggressive turning. The faster you corner, the more pressure you need to avoid tire roll in turns. Probably everyone here knows that but no one has mentioned how aggressively they corner. I corner cautiously so I can get away with lower presures in the rear.
    How you corner may be more important than how aggressively you corner. As a couple of examples taken to extremes, if you corner in a much more upright position, without leaning the bike, you'll have much more force applied to rolling to the outside of the turn.
    If you were to tilt the bike into the turn perfectly (which no one does) the force vector would go straight down from the CG through the axle through the center of the tire. In that case, there would be very little force either to the inside or the outside of the turn, to fold the tire over.

    On really nicely bermed turns, the tire won't fold due to this factor. The force will compress the tire, it won't fold it.

    Squirm is a different factor. With very little sidewall support, the grip of the tread can overcome that stiffness and move around as it tracks surface irregularities. But even at the low pressures I run, I'm not feeling that effect.

  14. #14
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    I'm ~185lbs, before riding gear.

    I ride in the PNW, and I'm a fairly intermediate rider. I'm not fast, although I try (mostly in the name of progression).

    Tire pressure to me really depends on the volume, casing, and speed you're going. Hard packed high speed berms, G outs/compressions, and big exposed rocks at speed are the ones that cause the most problems with low tire pressure.

    It took me a while before I was able to notice squirm. But now that I know what it feels like, its pretty easy to pick it up. In turns and G outs (anything with lots of force), the tires feel squirmy/mushy/vague. Rim damage is the other problem, usually if you're riding over chunky terrain at speed. And that feels fine... until you hit the one that actually impacts the rim (hard rock to rim contact) and dent it. The one time I went to a bike park, I dented a rim through a 2.3in EXO DHF at 30PSI (and punctured it). Apparently I needed more pressure.

    I tend to run ~18-20psi front (a huge 29x2.6in WTB Vigilante), and 22-24psi (29x2.4in Michelin Wild Enduro Rear)in the rear for pretty generic trail riding. If its super wet out, I'll drop a few PSI. For the bike park, I'll add at least 5-10psi to avoid the situation from last time.

    So yeah, basically run whatever pressure you feel is best. Just look out for the mushy/squirmy feeling in turns/compressions, and rims hitting things when you ride.

  15. #15
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    At the pressures I run I can distinctly roll the tire on pavement with a high lateral load (fast leaning turn on a flat paved surface). On dirt, I don't get enough traction to generate the lateral load needed to roll the tire. The tire slides before it rolls.
    What, me worry?

  16. #16
    Hoolie Ghoulie on Strava.
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    All great info above. I will add mine, as I am a late convert to low pressure, just getting off of 28 ish PSI from 3 yrs ago on older narrow rim setups. Now on new Ibis 941 rims (35mm internal) I run 18 PSI Front & 19 PSI rear on 2.6 tires, I weigh 200 completely geared up, pretty aggressive rider. If I am on chill ride, I may not check my tires before ride, so a PSI lower. If I am doing 3.5 hour XC ride or a flow trail with berms I add 2 PSI. If I am riding gnar rocks or with other advanced riders on technically rocky fast trails I keep my normal 18/19 PSI, which shows how amazing ALL new tires are. I am temporarily on 2.5 front and rears (vs 2.6) and using 18/19 PSI no problem.
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  17. #17
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    2.6 Rekon on i30mm rims, on an SB100. 155lb rider who charges hard.

    I run about 15-18psi in the rear. 18 is for DH runs with big rock gardens and such. I have hit some stuff pretty hard at that pressure without issue. Less than 15, and I start to feel the tire roll over in flat corners and on berms. I only run 15-16 when on typically-bumpy XC trails without too much steep stuff. I'd say 16-17 is my go-to for all-around trail riding.

    Front I can get away with lower, but 15-16psi feels really good, and I've never kissed a rim unless I nose-dive into a rock.

    Pressures should scale roughly linearly with weight. So a 220lb rider is 42% heavier than me. If I say 15/17 are my low-end pressures, that's 21/24 for the bigger guy. Coincidentally, that lines up exactly with what Cotharyus said.

  18. #18
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    This is one of those piece of string things. Downhill casings, inserts, wheel diameter. Just start high for a ride and keep letting them down until they feel good during the ride. Make a note of that pressure.

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