Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?

    Hello, everybody.

    Finally getting into the riding season here in MN.

    I am still on the Kona Unit 29" but my riding has changed drastically than what I originally had planned. I am doing mainly 20-30 mile rides on paved trails/gravel trails/gravel roads.

    And haven't been going to the mountain bike trails by me anymore. Mainly due to the poor conditions. "Broken glass all over, trash, etc."

    So, I decided this season I was going to go back to Tube. Because I am just so tired of maintaining the sealant in the Tubeless set-up.

    I am trying to decide if just cleaning the old Tires would be worth it. They still have some tread left. Or if I should just replace them with new.

    Now I know it sound like a easy choice. And it probably is... But, If I clean the tires themselves what would be the best method? "The sealant is that pink fleshy stuff"

    And if I replace them, what tires would you recommend? If I am replacing them anyways I might as well get a set that meets my needs more.

    But after looking over just a few. I was shocked at how expensive these can be. Heck even my motorcycle tires cost less than allot of them.

    So I need to find a tire that's not only affordable but one that would also last and meet the riding needs that I do now.

    I do have a set of Tubes and my rims are 29" MTB ST i23
    Cleaning the rims was easy but those tires...

  2. #2
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    I'd imagine most of the sealant will either pour out or fall out of the tires when you take them off the rims, I know mine always does. It's not necessary to remove every trace of the old sealant from the inside of your tires. If it were me, I'd just throw a tube in there and be done with it. If you feel you need to do more than that, a nylon scrub brush will work. As far as tires, get some 1.9 to 2.1 low profile treads and you'll be fine on gravel roads.

  3. #3
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    You aren't actually converting to 'tubed' as much as installing tubes. LOL

    Unless you have dried sealant on the inside of the tire making it out of balance, just empty the sealant, install tubes and enjoy.

    If you do need to remove the dried stuff, just do your best to scrape out what you can, be patient. If some if left it won't harm anything.

    When those tires wear out, figure out from your local shop what tires they have in stock and pick up the best choice for the current ride conditions.

  4. #4
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    I have found tubeless to be less maintenance than tubes. I guess YMMV but what issues have you ran into?


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  5. #5
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    The first time, I just pulled out all the dryed up stuff. the last 2 times, it was all pretty fresh, I took the tyres off, hosed them out, left to dry, then hosed and wiped down the rims, job done.
    I find, with a few bikes, depending on season/what i'm doing some dont get ridden for months at a time, when I do go to ride them, tubeless is a right mess/pain. Going back to tubes for me is much better.
    All the gear and no idea.

  6. #6
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    Same goes for me. The Tubeless are just a mess to deal with after every winter.

    Replacing/repairing tubes is quick easy and clean. I'm just not in need anymore for the benefits tubeless brings.

  7. #7
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    Oliver’s YES Tubes™ will make you happy!


    Are you always fixing your "bullet proof" No Tubes tires like this poor sap while your buddies wait impatiently?
    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?-badger.jpg

    Are you tired and frustrated breaking levers and gouging your rims trying to pry on and off tires that fit on your rims tighter than your pant size from Jr. High School?
    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?-wtf.jpg

    Are you sick of “No Tubes boogers” rattling around in your tires?
    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?-36e97987b542a87f842d206fb3c887f4.jpg

    Do you despise the thick film of latex that builds up and is impossible to remove from your tires?
    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?-mountain-bike-tubeless-tire-sealant-check-removal-tech04.jpg

    Have you been riding with folks using No Tubes and had to endure getting yourself, your gloves, and anything within ten yards coated in latex spooge from these No Tubes tires?
    tire-blowout at tarium raceTracy2.jpg

    Are you unwilling to carry a compressor with you on rides to re-seat the bead on these No tubes tires?
    Are you shell-shocked from filling up your tires and waiting for the random “gunshot” noise when it pops into place?

    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?-blowout.jpg

    Do you have better things to do than sit around and tape your rims all day, hoping that they will seal?
    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?-rims.jpg

    Are you sick of aluminum nipples corroding and breaking due to ammonia in the sealant?
    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?-dd220e9840207cd0c4dfec2abf3ad701.jpg

    Are you just plain tired of being an evangelist for a miraculous system that fails constantly?
    SALVATION is at hand with Oliver's Yes Tubes™ system!

    Oliver's Yes Tubes™, in a nutshell:
    Converting back to Tube, Should I clean old Tire or just replace with new ones?-kenda_kit_sq_jpg_1_tinyjpg_1024x1024.jpg

    Oliver's Yes Tubes™ Hop-Up Kit includes:
    • Two fully enclosed rubber tire filling devices with integrated valve stems (no need for "special" rimstrips!)
    • Detailed installation instructions.
    • Easy do-it-yourself installation, without having to use an air compressor.

    Oliver's Yes Tubes™ Hop-Up Kit does not include:
    Noxious latex spooge, "special" rimstrips, and most importantly it doesn't include hours upon hours of headaches and delays for your riding buddies.

    NEW PRODUCTS AVAILABLE NOW!

    The same folks that originally brought you Yes Tubes now offer some exciting new products:

    The Tricycle Hop Up kit.
    Yes Tubes Emergency repair kit Innovative Easy-does-it repair kit fixes Yes Tubes, without the spooginess!

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Q: What rim/tire combinations do Oliver's Yes Tubes™ work with?
    A: One of the benefits of Oliver's Yes Tubes™ system is that it is compatible with all rim/wheel combinations.

    Q: How much weight do you save using Oliver's Yes Tubes™?
    A: That varies by application, but in our experience the wait savings would have been many minutes, if not hours, if our riding buddies had been using Oliver's Yes Tubes™ system.

    Q: Do Oliver's Yes Tubes™ work on Road bikes or Cross bikes?
    A: YES! After years of testing, Oliver's Yes Tubes™ are finally available for 700c rims. At the same low price as Oliver's Yes Tubes™ for MTBs!

    Q: Will other riders know that I’m not using No Tubes?
    A: No, this product is completely stealthy and your advantage will be completely hidden, much like a motor in the seat tube.

    Q: I don’t see this coming on new bikes, how can it be any good?
    A: As you’ve noticed, manufacturers keep changing standards to keep making money. This works will all standards, so they wouldn’t be able to sell you new rims and tires all the time.

    Ah yes, the testimonials.

    Here are the words of some folks who have seen the Yes Tubes light (some names have been changed to protect them from reprisals from the No Tubes cartel).

    "OK, OK. I hate to say it but I've been a victim of Stan's now too. They're great while they hold air, but as soon as that bubble bursts (pun intended) it's a serious PIA (yes, I said serious too - and I don't really like to be serious).”

    “The handling at lower pressure was nice, but then when the pressure gets down around zero the handling really goes downhill (or doesn't when you wish it would). [Matt, somewhere in Colorado]”

    "This is great. I HAVE been living in Stan's ‘no-tubes hell’ -- cost me 30 minutes on my lap time, and a brand new tire at SnowShoe 3 weeks ago.”

    “So I shelled out the 65 bucks and got myself a kit and installed it and have been having nothing but problems with it since then. I hate no-tubes. I'll never race with them again after my suck-ass laps at SnowShoe" ["ERX" location unknown]”

    "I f'ing hate No Tubes. They could be more aptly marketed as: You're a Tube, No Air, Need More Air, More Pump or Pump 'a Chump, etc. I specifically removed them before my FFTF trip so that I did not have to bear the pain Jed so well evidenced. Flatted but once."

    “I spent $60 on the kit with s/h, an hour of my time drilling, soaping, installing kit and 5 minutes ripping it all apart and putting my Salsa "light" tubes back in. Oh yeah, I dropped another $125 on a (crappy) compressor at Home Depot just to install them. I may just wrap a piece of poo in my worthless rim strips, light on fire and ding-dong-ditch Senor Stan when next in his environs." [Sean, currently in witness protection program due to his Stan's comments] NOTE: these "Salsa" things he refers to are cheap knock-offs of Oliver's Yes Tubes™.
    Last edited by Jayem; 05-26-2019 at 10:03 PM.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #8
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    Well done, Jayem, well done!
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  9. #9
    slow
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    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Jayem again.

  10. #10
    A waste of time it is is
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    Got him for you sgltrak

  11. #11
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    Thats Gold!
    All the gear and no idea.

  12. #12
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    The biggest benefits of riding tubeless are lower pressures for better traction and more suppleness to float over / through obstacles. Why walk away from those things because of doing light maintenance on your wheels? It takes about three minutes to clean out old dried sealant and install new.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  13. #13
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    If it hasn't already been mentioned, sealant can glue the tube to the tire. After the desired amount of sealant removal, liberally coat the tube and inside of the tire and tube with talc to minimize sticking.
    What, me worry?

  14. #14
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    chain maintenance must be a right bitch for the OP.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Oliver’s YES Tubes™ will make you happy!
    Now I have to convert to WTB's just so I can modify the name on the tires!

  16. #16
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    Why do you think that? Chains are easy whether bicycle or motorcycle. Besides like I already mentioned I ride a Kona Unit. Which is a single speed. Can't get much simpler than that. So, it's possibly the lowest maintenance bike ever.


    Chains have nothing to do with the topic anyways...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    Why do you think that? Chains are easy whether bicycle or motorcycle. Besides like I already mentioned I ride a Kona Unit. Which is a single speed. Can't get much simpler than that. So, it's possibly the lowest maintenance bike ever.


    Chains have nothing to do with the topic anyways...
    I think he was trying get to “chain maintenance is more difficult than keeping a tubeless setup going”. Which he is right about.

    Granted I haven’t done this for a long time but in 2 years of running tubeless on 2 different bikes its way easier than running tubes. I was having to patch/replace tubes every 2-3 weeks then had a stretch where I went through probably 10 tubes in 3 weeks at which point I ditched them and went all tubeless. Since then I top them up with sealant about every 6-8 weeks and forget about them. I pulled the tires off at the beginning of spring and to my surprise had no stanimals(I’m in a humid climate. Maybe that helps?) and just slapped my new tires on my trail bike. Seated with a regular floor pump and ride on. I am running the Trek rim strips so that probably makes it easier though too. No tape to mess with.

    In my experience I can’t see it but if tubes work better for you then rock on and enjoy.


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  18. #18
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    If I were doing more Off-road mountain trails than I'd agree the tubeless option would be better and far more worthwhile.

    But, considering how I've been riding. I just feel Tubes would be better served. If this season I go though to many tubes. Going back to Tubeless would be nothing sense the tape is already on the rim. But, I cant really see myself running though Tubes as quickly as you've mentioned.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjonboy View Post
    The biggest benefits of riding tubeless are lower pressures for better traction and more suppleness to float over / through obstacles. Why walk away from those things because of doing light maintenance on your wheels? It takes about three minutes to clean out old dried sealant and install new.
    You are able to break the bead, pour in sealant and air up the tire in 3 minutes?

    It takes me 3 minutes to 'unstick' the tire to itself once I've gotten the bead on the rim.
    I have only removed/installed used tubless tires 2x, but each time I've had the same problem. I decided it's not worth it for me to break the seal of a tire to add sealant.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    If I were doing more Off-road mountain trails than I'd agree the tubeless option would be better and far more worthwhile.

    But, considering how I've been riding. I just feel Tubes would be better served. If this season I go though to many tubes. Going back to Tubeless would be nothing sense the tape is already on the rim. But, I cant really see myself running though Tubes as quickly as you've mentioned.
    Just get tubes with sealant already in them and you'll be fine. I rode a bike for 7 years or so and changed/patched tubes about 5 times total. Usually the tube would start to leak from a seam.

    I have used Giant and Specialized goop filled tubes and both work perfectly.

  21. #21
    A waste of time it is is
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    You are able to break the bead, pour in sealant and air up the tire in 3 minutes?

    It takes me 3 minutes to 'unstick' the tire to itself once I've gotten the bead on the rim.
    I have only removed/installed used tubless tires 2x, but each time I've had the same problem. I decided it's not worth it for me to break the seal of a tire to add sealant.
    Why break the bead? Drop the pressure, remove valve core, top up sealant using the right tools for the job (a syringe) replace valve, pump up tyre. Easy.

  22. #22
    A waste of time it is is
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    Make sure you stock up on these, 99p a tube. https://www.planetx.co.uk/c/q/deals/...eid=37faec1a00

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by emu26 View Post
    Why break the bead? Drop the pressure, remove valve core, top up sealant using the right tools for the job (a syringe) replace valve, pump up tyre. Easy.
    Plus, you don't even have to take the wheels off the bike. How much easier can it be?

    I use this syringe: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    If I were doing more Off-road mountain trails than I'd agree the tubeless option would be better and far more worthwhile.

    But, considering how I've been riding. I just feel Tubes would be better served. If this season I go though to many tubes. Going back to Tubeless would be nothing sense the tape is already on the rim. But, I cant really see myself running though Tubes as quickly as you've mentioned.
    Seems reasonable.

  25. #25
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    If re-using tires, check for any prickers poking through before installing tubes. Where I ride, these prickers pierce tires and break off making them difficult to see. When doing trailside flat repairs, I learned the importance of running hand around inside of tire to verify no issues before replacing tube. A tube will be short lived if you don't check for this. Years back I also tried slime tubes, and tire strips which were effective in reducing these type of flats on the trail. I went tubeless over 3 years ago and no longer deal with this...EVER!

    To clean sealant mung from tire ID, I would just use a stiff brush and car wash detergent in a bucket...does not need to be pristine.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by windsurfdog View Post
    Plus, you don't even have to take the wheels off the bike. How much easier can it be?
    There are tubes that are not in shape of a ring, but like a long snake. You don't have to take the wheel off. Linear tubes, if I recall the name right.
    https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=72372

    My response to the topic: When I have extra time, I remove all sealant. When I have little time, I only remove the thicker, easy to peel patches of dried sealant. When I have no time, I just install a tube on top of the sealant. In those cases, the time I saved by not removing sealant I'll have to spend removing a tube glued to the tire...

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by emu26 View Post
    Why break the bead? Drop the pressure, remove valve core, top up sealant using the right tools for the job (a syringe) replace valve, pump up tyre. Easy.
    Quote Originally Posted by windsurfdog View Post
    Plus, you don't even have to take the wheels off the bike. How much easier can it be?

    I use this syringe: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    I actually usually add new sealant through the valve stem. A few times I thought I'd try the break a bead thing. Once because I had dried sealant inside that caused the tire out of balance. I thought the 2nd time would be better so I broke the bead and same problems.

    I'm due for a new tire. I'll break the front tire to clean out the left over sealant when I install the new rear. Then switch sealant brand and have at it.

    I've been using the valve stem for a few years and it's easy. I keep a 2oz bottle around to use as the applicator.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjonboy View Post
    The biggest benefits of riding tubeless are lower pressures for better traction and more suppleness to float over / through obstacles. .
    If I run my tires any lower than they already are, I'm rolling around on the rims.
    Super low pressures only matter to people trying to out-dork each other on the internet. Real riding actually requires some air actually be left to keep the tires from squirming all over the place.

    Going into my third season without a flat, running tubed 3.0" tires at ~16r/14f, bony New England trails and willing to bet money that no one here could tell the difference between tubes and tubeless run at the same pressures in a blind taste test.
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  29. #29
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    Like other places in the country, thorns ABOUND here in Tucson. Each time you get a puncture you're going to lose sealant and air. No duh, right? You likely top off your tires before riding and so might not notice the loss of sealant until your "sealant" doesn't seal, somewhere out there. And I have yet to have a problem with the bead breaking as the last of the air escapes. So I carry the small bottle of Orange Seal, which comes with a small tube that fits my valve. Pull the core, squirt some sealant in, pump up and go. Don't even have to pull the wheel. If that totally fails, I also have a tube.

    I've also run sealant in tubes (w/remove able cores) for a couple of years, so the OP has that option. You get the best of both worlds, but with an additional 200+ grams of rotating mass.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    willing to bet money that no one here could tell the difference between tubes and tubeless run at the same pressures in a blind taste test.
    I don't know, there's lots of people around here with really sensitive taints.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I don't know, there's lots of people around here with really sensitive taints.
    Won't argue that!
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by windsurfdog View Post
    Plus, you don't even have to take the wheels off the bike. How much easier can it be?

    I use this syringe: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    I bought a couple of those small 2oz bottles of Stan’s and now I just use that to inject it into the valve stem.

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