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  1. #7801
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    Coming off Sun-Ringle Charger Pro 29er wheels (22.8mm inner width, 28mm outer width, 22mm tall profile), I'm in the process of building up a Kona Process 111. I have the option of going with the boring Hope Pro 4/ Stans Flow EX combo or for a few hundred more I can build up one of the LB carbon rims on Hope Pro 4s. I'm 225 lb, like to run pressures in the 24 psi F / 29 psi R range and have a couple of dings on the rear rim to prove I like to ride hard, and would love to drop to even lower pressures. I'll be most likely running 2.4/2.25 Ardents or something similar, question now to you folks is which LB rim suits me best?




  2. #7802
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    Kindly take note that most Chinese factories will have a holiday from Feb 3th to 17th for Spring Festival
    Carbon life, Carbon fan!
    MTB carbon rims & wheels, www.carbonbicycle.cc

  3. #7803
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    Coming off Sun-Ringle Charger Pro 29er wheels (22.8mm inner width, 28mm outer width, 22mm tall profile), I'm in the process of building up a Kona Process 111. I have the option of going with the boring Hope Pro 4/ Stans Flow EX combo or for a few hundred more I can build up one of the LB carbon rims on Hope Pro 4s. I'm 225 lb, like to run pressures in the 24 psi F / 29 psi R range and have a couple of dings on the rear rim to prove I like to ride hard, and would love to drop to even lower pressures. I'll be most likely running 2.4/2.25 Ardents or something similar, question now to you folks is which LB rim suits me best?
    I weigh about 15 pounds less and have been beating on a set of LB rims for 3+ years. At the time they were "wider 29er rims" but they're not very wide by today's standards. Maybe 25mm internal. I run the same tires you note and use about 25/30 psi.

    Last month I laced some 29mm internal 27.5 hoops for the wife's bike. Very nice! I can ride her bike with Ardent 2.25s at much lower pressure than I can my own bike with my narrower rims.

    I would strongly recommend the carbon hoops over the Stan's -- you will notice the improvement in tracking and steering.

    I would also suggest the 465g rims over the 420 -- I'm assuming they'll be stronger.


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  4. #7804
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    Coming off Sun-Ringle Charger Pro 29er wheels (22.8mm inner width, 28mm outer width, 22mm tall profile), I'm in the process of building up a Kona Process 111. I have the option of going with the boring Hope Pro 4/ Stans Flow EX combo or for a few hundred more I can build up one of the LB carbon rims on Hope Pro 4s. I'm 225 lb, like to run pressures in the 24 psi F / 29 psi R range and have a couple of dings on the rear rim to prove I like to ride hard, and would love to drop to even lower pressures. I'll be most likely running 2.4/2.25 Ardents or something similar, question now to you folks is which LB rim suits me best?



    the 35mm/30mm but do the 32 hole, I have the same ones and they have been ridden hard for 4 months and are still perfectly true! I'm 180lbs without gear and ride some gnarly downhills and they are perfect!
    '15 Transition Smuggler

  5. #7805
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    Coming off Sun-Ringle Charger Pro 29er wheels (22.8mm inner width, 28mm outer width, 22mm tall profile), I'm in the process of building up a Kona Process 111. I have the option of going with the boring Hope Pro 4/ Stans Flow EX combo or for a few hundred more I can build up one of the LB carbon rims on Hope Pro 4s. I'm 225 lb, like to run pressures in the 24 psi F / 29 psi R range and have a couple of dings on the rear rim to prove I like to ride hard, and would love to drop to even lower pressures. I'll be most likely running 2.4/2.25 Ardents or something similar, question now to you folks is which LB rim suits me best?



    Hello Europspek,

    The EN928 rim has extra reinforcement and is in stock. If you like the width, these would be a great option.

    AM928 asymmetric rim profile carbon 29 inch mountain rims Light-Bicycle

    You can also buy the 38's and choose the Heavy Duty version once you hit the "Buy Now" button on the page. These are slightly wider and deeper than the EN928's so they would be stiffer. Impact resistance is pretty similar between these 2 rims.

    carbon 29er mtb rims 38mm wide hookless tubeless compatible strongest Light-Bicycle

    The RM29C07 isn't going to have as much impact resistance or stiffness as the other 2 rims I mentioned. For your weight and aggressive riding style, the other 2 are more suitable.

    Thank you,
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
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  6. #7806
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    light bicycle, do you have a narrower asymmetrical rim in the works? 28 - 30mm . The 34mm is just too wide for xc racing duties. thanks

  7. #7807
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    It depends on where you ride too, I did a trip to Phoenix a few months back (I used to live in AZ) and the rocks kicked up riding in tech places can make some nasty dings in your rims, as well as sharp rocks on the sides of the trail. Skinnier will minimize this and put more distance between your edges and the ground if you are running lower pressure. While you can go wide, 35 is pretty wide.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #7808
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    Quote Originally Posted by adinpapa View Post
    light bicycle, do you have a narrower asymmetrical rim in the works? 28 - 30mm . The 34mm is just too wide for xc racing duties. thanks
    Yes, we have several new rims coming out after Chinese New Year (~3 weeks) and some are narrower and more XC/Trail friendly.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
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  9. #7809
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    I need some help. I don't post often but lurk a lot.
    I am going to be upgrading my instinct to XX1 and as such also have the opprotunity to change wheelsets (because of the need for XD and I have non-changable xt hubs)
    I am going with LB Wheelset and this is where I need the help.
    My dream build is CX-Ray spokes with DTSwiss 240's on LB 30mm wide hookless rims.
    quote is just under $1000USD
    Their stock build is pillar aero spokes, Nova teach 771 and 772 hubs on LB 30mm wide hookless rims. quote is just over $550USD
    and their "claimed" weights are within 50grams of each other. 1500gr and 1550gr
    SO the questions is.....
    is there a $500 difference in quality/durability/serviceablity between them. I have owned neither type of hub or spoke before.

    Thanks

  10. #7810
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkyto View Post
    I need some help. I don't post often but lurk a lot.
    I am going to be upgrading my instinct to XX1 and as such also have the opprotunity to change wheelsets (because of the need for XD and I have non-changable xt hubs)
    I am going with LB Wheelset and this is where I need the help.
    My dream build is CX-Ray spokes with DTSwiss 240's on LB 30mm wide hookless rims.
    quote is just under $1000USD
    Their stock build is pillar aero spokes, Nova teach 771 and 772 hubs on LB 30mm wide hookless rims. quote is just over $550USD
    and their "claimed" weights are within 50grams of each other. 1500gr and 1550gr
    SO the questions is.....
    is there a $500 difference in quality/durability/serviceablity between them. I have owned neither type of hub or spoke before.

    Thanks
    I'd go DT350s, little more weight same internals as far as I know.
    OG Ripley v2

  11. #7811
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkyto View Post
    I need some help. I don't post often but lurk a lot.
    I am going to be upgrading my instinct to XX1 and as such also have the opprotunity to change wheelsets (because of the need for XD and I have non-changable xt hubs)
    I am going with LB Wheelset and this is where I need the help.
    My dream build is CX-Ray spokes with DTSwiss 240's on LB 30mm wide hookless rims.
    quote is just under $1000USD
    Their stock build is pillar aero spokes, Nova teach 771 and 772 hubs on LB 30mm wide hookless rims. quote is just over $550USD
    and their "claimed" weights are within 50grams of each other. 1500gr and 1550gr
    SO the questions is.....
    is there a $500 difference in quality/durability/serviceablity between them. I have owned neither type of hub or spoke before.

    Thanks
    The DT 350 hubs have great value and are more reliable than the Novatec hubs. The DT 240 hubs have stainless bearings and more machining so they are lighter than 350's but still have great value and are an upgrade to your XT's. The 240 and 350 hubs use the same star ratchet system, freehub bodies, and share the same end caps as well.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
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  12. #7812
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    Hi Light bicycle. When can I purchase a wheelset from you with the new Hope Pro 4 hubs? They are not yet listed on the website.
    Thanks.

  13. #7813
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    As for the Pillar vs CX Ray question, I was recommended Pillar 1420 over CX Ray by a local wheelbuilding guru/artist/magician. I built the up myself on LB 35mm hookless 27.5", and they have held up 1.5 seasons with trail riding and enduro racing.

  14. #7814
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    After a bit of build advice.

    Dropped off my LB 35mm rims and DT Swiss hubs last night at the builders and he asked weather I wanted 2 or 3 cross? I'm not sure to be honest so wondered what other people have gone with or recommended?

    Edit: These are 650b rims, didn't realise I was in the 29er section, sorry!

  15. #7815
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    Looking forward to seeing new asymmetric offerings. Seems to be a good idea for any wheel - Road, MTB and CX.

  16. #7816
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    Quote Originally Posted by fathomer View Post
    After a bit of build advice.

    Dropped off my LB 35mm rims and DT Swiss hubs last night at the builders and he asked weather I wanted 2 or 3 cross? I'm not sure to be honest so wondered what other people have gone with or recommended?
    If that builder is any good he should tell you what he recommends for this combo.

    It depends how many spokes you have, those rims come in many drilling options.

  17. #7817
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy13 View Post
    Looking forward to seeing new asymmetric offerings. Seems to be a good idea for any wheel - Road, MTB and CX.
    Not sure about road, aerodynamics come into play and an asymmetric rim can cause a side force or steering force. Also front hubs on road bikes are symmetric (assuming no disc brakes), so there is no point there.

    But generally yes, there is no reason to have a symmetric rim on a mountain bike that I can think of. Cost should be the same for aluminum and carbon, its just a different mold/extrusion. Once everyone upgrade their tooling we will probably not see high end symmetric disc rims anymore in a few years.
    But manufacturers have a lot of investment in tooling, so it will take a complete product cycle or two to get rid of this legacy.

    What I do want to see is prices go down. Currently Light Bicycle is charging a premium for asymmetric, because they can. More competition and prices will get back to what they used to be.

  18. #7818
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhack View Post
    Hi Light bicycle. When can I purchase a wheelset from you with the new Hope Pro 4 hubs? They are not yet listed on the website.
    Thanks.
    We have them on order and they are supposed to be here late February/Early March. You could check back with us later this month. Alternatively you could purchase a Pro 2 wheelset and just specify that you want us to wait to build on Pro 4's in the checkout notes. We check these notes carefully on each order.
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  19. #7819
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    For all you asymmetric geeks, Nextie has loads of sizes and way cheaper than Light Bicycle, around $100 less per rim.

    Nextie Asymmetric

  20. #7820
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrozCountry View Post
    For all you asymmetric geeks, Nextie has loads of sizes and way cheaper than Light Bicycle, around $100 less per rim.

    Nextie Asymmetric
    Not bad : Asymmetric AM / Enduro 33mm Width Carbon Fiber 29" MTB Clincher Rim Hookless shipped to USA for $373 might be my new wheel build.
    Or the Asymmetric Cross Country 28mm Width 22mm internal for $353 shipped
    ​​
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  21. #7821
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    Nextie options looks good, I'm rolling on a set currently. Light Bicycle seems to get a lot of play in the thread lately, glad to see Nextie is still in the game.
    Do you know if the holes are angled or straight? I do believe Light Bicycle angles the holes in their asymmetrical rims.
    Don't know that it's worth the extra coin they currently cost.
    That extra width in the rim lip thickness is a big plus in my book, much less likely to cut through the tire bead causing a pinch flat, and makes a sturdier hoop.

  22. #7822
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    Agreed CrozCountry. Road rim brake front there is no reason for asymmetrical rims. Thanks for the Nextie link, some nice options.

  23. #7823
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    Guys is there a "healthy" recap of what is the most "wise" move to pull with this nipple dilemma.. Brass vs alloy. I am building chinese carbon rims with some hope pro 4 hubs and wonder if i should go alloy or brass. Ordered sapim d-light spokes..

    Thanks for answer

  24. #7824
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    I use alu nips for years on alu rims, with tubeless setup, never have any problem. now with carbon rim, still using alu nips, no problem so far. I don't know any body has alu nip problem, except from internet.

  25. #7825
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    Same here.^^^ No issues with alu nips either but I don't ride in the ocean either.

    But I wonder how long it will take for the (cheap) Chinese knock-off outfits to copy Derby on his drain holes?

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-derby_2.jpg

  26. #7826
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    My last build was a carbon rim with Sapim D-Light and Sapim anodized alloy nipples, and after the build I put a drop of a thin oil in each nipple/rim interface for better water displacement.
    Don't know how good this is, but at least it gives me a little of peace of mind.

  27. #7827
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    Thanks, are you using normal length (12mm) or 14 or 16mm?? I choose the same spokes d-lights

    Thank you

  28. #7828
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    Same here.^^^ No issues with alu nips either but I don't ride in the ocean either.

    But I wonder how long it will take for the (cheap) Chinese knock-off outfits to copy Derby on his drain holes?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Actually i was asking about drain holes the nextie guy Brian, and he said thay could do it but they dont really see the point..

  29. #7829
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    Thanks, are you using normal length (12mm) or 14 or 16mm?? I choose the same spokes d-lights

    Thank you
    I used 14mm Sapim polyax hexagon without slotted head, my rim nipple seat bead is 3.5mm thick so I just ordered the 14mm to play safe, and I think I did the right choice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    Actually i was asking about drain holes the nextie guy Brian, and he said thay could do it but they dont really see the point..
    IMO, and its just that an opinion, but I think that hole only make the rim less strong, and we had never needed drain holes, why would we be needing them now?
    That hole, at least for me, seams to be just a good place for a rim to crack.

    P.S.- not to mention that hole also seems to be a good place for the dirt to enter.

  30. #7830
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    Thanks, are you using normal length (12mm) or 14 or 16mm?? I choose the same spokes d-lights

    Thank you
    I use 12mm brass. ENVE uses 10mm brass. Galvanic corrosion is a possibility worth avoiding.

  31. #7831
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    I think i might try front wheel with alloy nipples and rear with brass..

    I dont actually get the point of nipple length, is it the amount of "contact" that tread of spoke makes to the nipple? Why would enve use only 10mm?

  32. #7832
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    Actually i was asking about drain holes the nextie guy Brian, and he said thay could do it but they dont really see the point..
    I don't find that response surprising do you? Especially if it increases his manufacturing costs.

    My thinking is why not? Especially if you ride where it's wet like the Pacific NW or do a lot of stream crossings. Water gets in through the nipple seat. Even at max spoke tension water will seep in. No stopping it. Maybe the drain holes help, maybe not. My guess is they do and I haven't heard of any Derby failures related to drain holes. Anyone?

  33. #7833
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    I think i might try front wheel with alloy nipples and rear with brass..

    I dont actually get the point of nipple length, is it the amount of "contact" that tread of spoke makes to the nipple? Why would enve use only 10mm?
    Weight. They sell them on their site for 50 cents each. Dans Comp supplies the 12mm brass for free with the Sapim Lasers I like.

  34. #7834
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    (...)Why would enve use only 10mm?
    Enve use inverted internal nipples, and because they are internal they don't need to be as long,
    You can buy from Enve or Sapim, I think I also saw once a 3rd party, don't recall where.
    The ones from Sapim are available in 9mm and 12mm, and if I'm building a rim with internal nipples I would go with the 9mm from Sapim, lighter, cheaper and definitively not inferior.
    Do notice, that inverted nipples are design to be used with specific rims, with thinner and directional holes, and not normal rims.

  35. #7835
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    Inverted | Sapim
    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-inverted.png

    Inverted nipples are used in special rims. Because the whole nipple remains in the rim, it gives a better aerodynamic profile as well as a better design. Due to its special use, Sapim offers inverted nipples in 8,5, 10 and 12 mm.

    Picture says 9 and 12mm.

  36. #7836
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    Just got my rims back from customs.

    After detailed inspections i found out this, is this normal or you had similar things with your or i should warranty them?
    Is there anything to worry about that lip anomaly or i shouldn't bother at all?
    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-img_1180.jpg
    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-img_1185.jpg
    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-img_1181.jpg

  37. #7837
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    I would send them pictures and see if they will warranty them.
    If they do ask them to send a call tag so you can ship those back at their expense and not have to pay return shipping charges.
    If you get lucky they might just tell you to keep them.
    ​​
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  38. #7838
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    Yeah already did that, but rims are probably totally safe to lace or build up right?

  39. #7839
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    Where did you get them from?

  40. #7840
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    Nextie's

  41. #7841
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    Did they answer your question already? Curious what they offered !

  42. #7842
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    They are still on vacation, will respond probably on friday..

  43. #7843
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    Guys can you help me understanding these:

    I have a schwalbe Snakeskin Magic mary on 22.5mm ID wide rim
    And i have a schwalbe Supergravity Magic mary on 28mm ID wide rim

    With first setup the MM tire is much wider, how the hack is this possible?

  44. #7844
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    Pics?
    Is this measured from outside knob to outside knob?
    Or from casing to casing?

  45. #7845
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    Just to be sure, they are both 2.35", right?
    The wider one it's not a 2.50" tire by chance?

  46. #7846
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    Couldn't take any good pictures indoors, got a few but situation on photos is even more extreme than in flash.

    Yes sure they are both 2.35"..

    The stupid thing bothered me so much that i installed the "old" magic mary on rear 28ID carbon rim and new SG MM on front 28ID carbon rim and they are identical, the old one could be a millimetre or even less wider due to stretching..

    So bottom line is that with 22.5mm internal dt swiss wheelset the tire was way more beefier than both magic marys mounted on Nextie 35mm rims (28mm internal)..

    Havent got a single clue how this is possible i was like 99% sure its the tire fault but it obviously not.

  47. #7847
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    This is comparison between:

    Magic Mary 2.35" on 28mm internal wide nextie rim and
    Hans Dampf 2.35" on 22.5mm internal wide dt swiss rim (muddy one)

    Its really hard to capture photo that would show the actual situaton, but i can tell you that hansdampf on 22.5mm rim is wider for about 2-3mm compared to magic mary (which is much more beefier tire) mounted on 28mm id.

    This is really frustrating



    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-img_1315.jpg

  48. #7848
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    Guys can you help me understanding these:

    I have a schwalbe Snakeskin Magic mary on 22.5mm ID wide rim
    And i have a schwalbe Supergravity Magic mary on 28mm ID wide rim

    With first setup the MM tire is much wider, how the hack is this possible?
    Like said before, did you measure the casing or the knobs?
    When the tire is rounder (narrower rim) the side knobs are in a bigger angle and that may contribute to wider tire at the knobs. But the casing width should increase in size with rim width.

  49. #7849
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    YOu are right, i was measuring the knobs which were wider like you said but the tire cassing itself is a bit wider with new rim.

    But i dont understand why my friend with 25mm internal width rim has bigger MagicMary tire than me on 22.5mm ID... And how the hack are other users get their tires that big, is it difference between 28mm ID and 32mm ID really that huge than..

  50. #7850
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    This question has been languishing here for a while, so I figured I would add a couple other things to consider. You have offered up a confusing mishmash of dissimilar tire and rim comparisons and your unit of measure seems to range from "less wide" to "more beefier" so it is really tough to say anything for certain. You did provide a few usable bits of data though, and, if you want to continue to try to sort it out, I can suggest a few other things to check.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    The stupid thing bothered me so much that i installed the "old" magic mary on rear 28ID carbon rim and new SG MM on front 28ID carbon rim and they are identical, the old one could be a millimetre or even less wider due to stretching..

    So bottom line is that with 22.5mm internal dt swiss wheelset the tire was way more beefier than both magic marys mounted on Nextie 35mm rims (28mm internal)..
    This is the only really valid comparison. Comparing a HD to a MM is not going to tell us anything for certain, and even comparing two different casing MMs throws some uncertainty into things. You need to compare the exact same tire, at the same pressure, mounted on two different rims, which you did here, and so you seem to have confirmed that the same tire appears "beefier" on the 22.5mm DT rim than on the 28mm Nextie.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaci View Post
    YOu are right, i was measuring the knobs which were wider like you said but the tire cassing itself is a bit wider with new rim.

    But i dont understand why my friend with 25mm internal width rim has bigger MagicMary tire than me on 22.5mm ID... And how the hack are other users get their tires that big, is it difference between 28mm ID and 32mm ID really that huge than..
    OK, so in this first paragraph here you establish that you were looking at the knobs, not casing, which may explain the "beefier" appearance with the narrower rim, as the knobs splay out more on the narrower rim. You also seem to have now observed that, in fact, the casing is wider on the wider rim, just as one would expect.

    But then in the second paragraph you introduce a whole other, previously unmentioned, rim (25mm), and say it's MM appears wider than on your 22.5 rim, again not telling us if you are looking at knobs or casing. If you are looking at casing, of course it's wider on a 25mm rim than a 22.5mm! And when you say "how are other...users getting their tires that big", how do you know that theirs are bigger than yours (which gives me a chuckle to even say) if you aren't actually measuring yours with calipers?

    I'm not trying to be mean, but dude, you need to:
    1. Get yourself some digital calipers
    2. Start measuring casings and knobs and specifying which you are talking about.
    3. Stop comparing the unmeasured appearance of your tires to the unmeasured appearance of tires in a photo on the internet, or other differing tire models for that matter.

    If you actually do all of that and still find your wider rims are resulting in a narrower tire casing, then let us know. One possibility is if your Nextie's have a particularly tall rim sidewall, as many hookless rims do, they will constrain the tire to a few mm greater height than a shorter model like a Stan's do. I'm not sure where DT's stack up in the mix of things.

    On a more exciting note, anyone got any hands on experience/ride reports with any of the asymmetric rims with the reinforced spoke holes that are showing up on the various rim websites?

  51. #7851
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk View Post
    Here are my thoughts:

    These rims seem great so far. No complaints once so ever, but if I were to order them again I would get carbon cycle's 38mm rims. I noticed them after I had ordered these. No big deal, but the new 38mm rims are wider and 20g lighter.

    28 hole straight pulls: I don't see strength or stiffness being an issue with these at all for my 185b weight. I don't really do drops higher than 2' though. But, if I could do it all over again I would have ordered 32 hole hubs and rims. In the end, going 28 hole I felt I had to go DT Comps to ensure strength and stiffness. I did not want to build up with Sapim lasers and be disappointed. Going 32 hole J-bend, spoke selection would have been better too. I have a ton of left over spokes from my wheel build and carry extras in my camelback.

    I am pretty sure if I went 32 hole I could have built up a lighter and as stiff or stiffer wheel. But again, I am new to this and don't have any other build experience to go off of.

    As a plus, straight pulls lace really easy (being a rookie wheel builder). As mentioned above, I did not experience the spokes spinning either. I think with the components used in my build, it could not have been any easier.
    Ok, bigdrunk, I am about to pull the trigger. Was thinking either the carbon bicycle 35/30 that you used, or the new asymetrical. 35/29. For 29 inch wheels. Asymmetric Mountain bike 29er AM hookless rim 35mm wide - carbon rim (Asmymetric) - Carbonfan|Carbon Rim|Carbon Wheel|Carbon Bicycle|Carbon Frame|Carbon Bike Part|Mountain bike

    I don't want to go as wide as 38mm.

    Going to go with DT 350 hubs as I can't afford i9s or DT 240, brass nipps, Sapim Laser j bend spokes, 32 holes. These will go on my new Kona Process 111. I am high 170's to 185 in weight and ride similarly to you. No drops over 2-ish feet. Little floats here and there. Riding in the Sun Valley, Idaho area. Mostly hard, with some loose over hard, some rocks and spiney stuff, a very few rock gardens. Perfect 29er land. Similar enough to your situation that I feel comfortable ordering similar stuff, with more spokes.

    Now I have to see whether I will have them build them, or attempt on my own. I have never built a wheel before, and want to feel pretty confident in the end result.

  52. #7852
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    delete duplicate due to chrome fart.
    Last edited by sunvalleylaw; 03-09-2016 at 08:03 PM. Reason: delete duplicate

  53. #7853
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    Just finished carbon cycle 35 29 id asymmetric build 32 hole with 240 dt Swiss. Built after bigdrunk posted his. Came in at 720 front 810 rear with tape and valves. Three rides at 20 psi rear 18 front rr 2.25 rear 2.35 front. Seems glued to the ground but still rolls with buddy's in group ride. Highly recommend carbon cycle so far asked for 400 gram rims and that's exactly what I got. Also great luck with light bike rims three sets in our group for last three years trouble free. But they seem do be expensive compared to carbon cycles. Fwiw compare carbon cycle 35 to nox farlow they seem identical.

  54. #7854
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    They are all selling the same non-Enve by any stretch of the imagination rim. Things are changing quickly so the 35/30 is a dated design already somewhat less desirable than the wider and/or asymmetrical options they have recently listed at higher prices. In other words the market for it is diminishing among the informed non first time or bargain buyers. It is ripe for discounting not for nickel and diming. It's perfect for expanding the Chinese carbon rim market toward the segment currently choosing aluminum rims with a $125 price point and $40/pr shipping with no phony fees. Are these guys smart enough to read the market? We'll see.
    Probably already on Alibaba for $99 if you could negotiate the poor web design and lack of specifics.

    Why pay $365 for rims when you can get a finished wheelset using the same rims for $465+75 ship?
    Hookless 35mm Wide 29" Carbon Mountain Wheels Tubeless Compatible Am DH | eBay
    Well, hell. Seems like I might as well just order these, and as you say later, if the rear breaks, get a DT 350 and Laser Sapims and re-lace then.

    I have an email into him to look at possibilities.

    EDIT: Sorry for all the posts. I read through this entire thread tonight trying to learn, and a few things came up as I read.
    Last edited by sunvalleylaw; 03-09-2016 at 10:27 PM.

  55. #7855
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    Supposedly my new bike is on its way to the bike shop (or possibly even being put together as I type). One of the long term upgrades I plan is carbon wheels. Only problem is I'm completely ignorant about what I need/want. Do any of you guys (or gals) have suggestions on a good place to start learning? I figure I have about 12 months to a year before I'll be able to pull off the upgrade. Plenty of time for research. I'm definitely leaning toward the no name option, but again, am ignorant of what's out there.

    Thanks for any suggestions!

  56. #7856
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    Quote Originally Posted by kieljon View Post
    Supposedly my new bike is on its way to the bike shop (or possibly even being put together as I type). One of the long term upgrades I plan is carbon wheels. Only problem is I'm completely ignorant about what I need/want. Do any of you guys (or gals) have suggestions on a good place to start learning? I figure I have about 12 months to a year before I'll be able to pull off the upgrade. Plenty of time for research. I'm definitely leaning toward the no name option, but again, am ignorant of what's out there.

    Thanks for any suggestions!
    Read this thread, search and read other threads, and know that in 12mos you will have even more options. Good luck.

    Hell, in 12months the wheel size of your bike may be obsolete and on clearance.

  57. #7857
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfxc View Post
    Read this thread, search and read other threads, and know that in 12mos you will have even more options. Good luck.

    Hell, in 12months the wheel size of your bike may be obsolete and on clearance.
    +1 on this.

    this actually happened to me, not the obsolete wheel size thing , but the options available.
    In one years the options went up by 3x, the prices changed, the design and strengths changed, the damn Dollar/Euro rate changed and not in my favor , and I ended up buying a set of rims that weight more 100g that I was originally looking, are asymmetric, don't have nipple holes in rim bed, the design is the oppose of I was locking at first...

    So, yeah... Nine months from now is when you should start looking for your new rims
    Last edited by Aglo; 03-15-2016 at 12:02 AM. Reason: damn auto correct :)

  58. #7858
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfxc View Post
    Read this thread, search and read other threads, and know that in 12mos you will have even more options. Good luck.

    Hell, in 12months the wheel size of your bike may be obsolete and on clearance.
    And make notes while you read it, save them to your own document. Otherwise, if you want to find something you saw here, you will have to search 7000 posts. Add a few more thousands a year from now when you are actually going to buy

  59. #7859
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aglo View Post
    +1 on this.

    this actually happened to me, not the obsolete wheel size thing , but the options available.
    In one years the options went up by 3, the prices changed, the design and strengths changed, the damn Dollar/Euro rate changed and not in my favor , and I ended up buying a set of rims that weight more 100g that I was originally locking, are asymmetric, don't have nipple holes in rim bed, the design is the oppose of I was locking at first...

    So, yeah... Nine months from now is when you should start looking for your new rims
    Any chance you can post a link to the hoops you bought?
    How where they to lace up? Or replace a spoke?

  60. #7860
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    Making the decision. Going to order either LB, or Carbon Bicycle rims, the DT 350 hubs, Sapim Lasers with brass nipples, and tape/etc. to set up tubeless. Just deciding on the "normal" 35/30 rims for 29ers, or the asymmetric. probably will just go standard as it is cheaper, and seems to have worked for others.

  61. #7861
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimitrin View Post
    Any chance you can post a link to the hoops you bought?
    How where they to lace up? Or replace a spoke?
    Sure, here you go:

    I bought them from Peter, he is easy to talk to and answer really quick, you can even have real time talk by mail .
    Rims: HR933C 29er asym rim 30mm depth 33mm wide - Xiamen Carbon Speed

    They have have 3.5mm thick walls and nipple seat bed, this make them heavier but stronger.

    I laced them myself, they built really well and easy, I used 2cross and Sapim D-Ligth spokes.

    As they are asymmetric, it really help in the lacing when building up the proper tension and balancing it.

    As mentioned before, I opted to not have nipple holes in rim bed, this make the tubeless setup so much easy, but the lacing process more demanding and longer, but nothing major, it just take more time and attention at first when tacking up the slack and build tension.

    I have put them to some abuse, nothing extreme, but my ride is something between AM and Enduro. After three months and about 500Km they are true and trouble free.

    Didn't broke any spoke/nipple yet, but don't foresee any trouble, I just need to remove the nipple from inside the rim and replace the spoke/nipple.
    I already did this when by mistake a couple of 2.3mm nipples were shipped along my 2mm nipple order and unfasten inside the rim when lacing them.

    If you want I can post some photos of them.

  62. #7862
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    Pics would be very nice, these are on my shortlist.

  63. #7863
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    Here are my LB 24/30 U-Shape rims laced up to White Industries MI6 hubs. I opted to have the new Avatar logo affixed as a decal at the valve stem location underneath the matte clear coat. I couldn't be happier with how they turned out and the quality.

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-img_2634.jpg

  64. #7864
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunvalleylaw View Post
    Making the decision. Going to order either LB, or Carbon Bicycle rims, the DT 350 hubs, Sapim Lasers with brass nipples, and tape/etc. to set up tubeless. Just deciding on the "normal" 35/30 rims for 29ers, or the asymmetric. probably will just go standard as it is cheaper, and seems to have worked for others.

    Looked again. Seems like Carbon Bicycle 35/30 is the way to go for me. A big difference in price that can help pay for spokes and etc. and eb188 and bigdrunk seem to have had good luck.

  65. #7865
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboyd122 View Post
    Here are my LB 24/30 U-Shape rims laced up to White Industries MI6 hubs. I opted to have the new Avatar logo affixed as a decal at the valve stem location underneath the matte clear coat. I couldn't be happier with how they turned out and the quality.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Looks great! I wish those hubs were within my budget as they look nice. How did you get LB to use the smaller sticker? I did not see an option when compiling a "practice" order.

  66. #7866
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    In the comments section in the order form I asked them to do it and attached a picture I found earlier in this thread to show them what I was asking for. I also clarified it with them in email after the order was processed.

  67. #7867
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Inverted | Sapim

    Inverted nipples are used in special rims. Because the whole nipple remains in the rim, it gives a better aerodynamic profile as well as a better design. Due to its special use, Sapim offers inverted nipples in 8,5, 10 and 12 mm.

    Picture says 9 and 12mm.
    Presumably this means you have to pull your wheels and rim tape off if you need to true your wheel or change a spoke? Seems awkward.

  68. #7868
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aglo View Post
    Sure, here you go:

    I bought them from Peter, he is easy to talk to and answer really quick, you can even have real time talk by mail .
    Rims: HR933C 29er asym rim 30mm depth 33mm wide - Xiamen Carbon Speed

    They have have 3.5mm thick walls and nipple seat bed, this make them heavier but stronger.

    I laced them myself, they built really well and easy, I used 2cross and Sapim D-Ligth spokes.

    As they are asymmetric, it really help in the lacing when building up the proper tension and balancing it.

    As mentioned before, I opted to not have nipple holes in rim bed, this make the tubeless setup so much easy, but the lacing process more demanding and longer, but nothing major, it just take more time and attention at first when tacking up the slack and build tension.

    I have put them to some abuse, nothing extreme, but my ride is something between AM and Enduro. After three months and about 500Km they are true and trouble free.

    Didn't broke any spoke/nipple yet, but don't foresee any trouble, I just need to remove the nipple from inside the rim and replace the spoke/nipple.
    I already did this when by mistake a couple of 2.3mm nipples were shipped along my 2mm nipple order and unfasten inside the rim when lacing them.

    If you want I can post some photos of them.
    Thanks for posting. Yes pics would be good. My main concern with this design is how to get the nipple out of the rim if I were to break a spoke.

  69. #7869
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  70. #7870
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimitrin View Post
    Thanks for posting. Yes pics would be good. My main concern with this design is how to get the nipple out of the rim if I were to break a spoke.
    Sorry, I didn't yet had the time to post the pics, I will try post them later today or tomorrow.

    Now, how to take out the nipples?
    I was planing to shoot a video, but I did remember that once saw an asian chick doing something similar. And I vaguely remember it was from Yoeleo, 30 sec search on Youtube and here is the video:



    So it was not something similar, it was exactely what you ask

    If the broken spoke thread is still screwed to the the nipple, its even easier, you just need a magnet and extract it trough the valve hole.

    Edit: The magnet thing only work if your spokes are steel, and aren't from a stainless steel type that is not magnetic.
    If you use Sapin, DT or Wheelsmith, you are probably good to go .

  71. #7871
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    Ok, here are the promised photos:

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-rims-2-.jpg

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-rims-3-.jpg

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-rims-4-.jpg

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-rims-8-.jpg

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-rims-5-.jpg

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-rims-6-.jpg

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-rims-7-.jpg

    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-rims-1-.jpg

    If you want to see them without the stickers, I have first to find the photos I took without them .

    I decided to apply stickers after swapping bikes with a buddy, and he hadn't rode for 10m and had already scratch them
    Using the Enve stickers allowed me to cover 3/4 of the rims on both sides, and they look rad, so win win .

  72. #7872
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    Are those Enve rims? o.O

  73. #7873
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonlui View Post
    Are those Enve rims? o.O
    Faux Enve...

    Enve rims for people who don't want to pay for them... so "Envy" rims if you will.

  74. #7874
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
    Faux Enve...

    Enve rims for people who don't want to pay for them... so "Envy" rims if you will.
    Yes, I "envy" those stikers, the design is awesome, and they protect 4/3 of the rim surface .
    But whenever people ask about the rims, I outright tell them that the rims are not Enve.
    And you are right, I definitively don't want to pay for them .

  75. #7875
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
    Faux Enve...

    Enve rims for people who don't want to pay for them... so "Envy" rims if you will.
    That's as funny as this Chinese Flyxxi Carbon frame I bought off a guy.(Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-p5pb12731376.jpg
    Yes I took off all the stickers didn't want to be seen riding a Fake Specialized Carbon frame lol
    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-67087c0e-b47c-4df1-9534-1e03aca0ab06_zpspnezq1kw.jpg
    I did leave the Special Ed on it thou
    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?-27ec10a9-0cd0-4115-9b70-891e5ccfb75e_zpsqabpfckg.jpg
    For the record The ENVE Bars Stem and Seat post are real ENVE parts
    ​​
    2015 Flyxii / ENVE /Chris King Carbon 29'er H.T.
    SRAM XX1
    2012 Stump Jumper Comp 29'er H.T. SRAM XX1
    1997 Rock Hopper / Rock Shox Recon Silver / 1 x 10 SRAM X9 XO Mix XT V Brake system

  76. #7876
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    Well, I pulled the trigger and ordered 35/30s from Carbon Bicycle. So here goes! Will put together the rest of my order via Dans Comp for spokes and such, and figure out what I need to set up for tubeless with my Ardents.

  77. #7877
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunvalleylaw View Post
    Well, I pulled the trigger and ordered 35/30s from Carbon Bicycle. So here goes! Will put together the rest of my order via Dans Comp for spokes and such, and figure out what I need to set up for tubeless with my Ardents.
    Also, I did not order them lighter than the stock 430+/- as I think that will be light enough and saving 20 or 30 grams on the rim is not worth it to me since these are my first carbon, and I am not a super lightweight rider at 180 lbs +/-.

  78. #7878
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    Galvanic corrosion is a problem Enve ran into with their carbon wheels. They now just use brass nipples. If you want to use aluminum figure on replacing them every two seasons.

  79. #7879
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    Or....you can read all the threads on galvanic corrosion in relation to carbon rims and aluminum nipples. Some believe that the Enve issue was primarily due to poor anodization of the aluminum nipples. Other users have experienced similar issues when using cheaply anodized aluminum nipples. Enve addressed the issue by changing to a specially designed brass nipple that is very minimalist to address the weight issue (brass vs. aluminum). Many users have built carbon rims from many manufacturers using quality anodized aluminum nipples with no issues for years of use. If you are looking to lighten a wheel build, many experienced wheel builders would recommend using quality aluminum nipples.
    That being said, there is no problem using brass nipples. They are just a little heavier.

  80. #7880
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Galvanic corrosion is a problem Enve ran into with their carbon wheels. They now just use brass nipples. If you want to use aluminum figure on replacing them every two seasons.
    I was figuring on Sapim Lasers from Dan's Comp with brass nipples included.

  81. #7881
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunvalleylaw View Post
    I was figuring on Sapim Lasers from Dan's Comp with brass nipples included.
    I used those with that rim. Good combo and the build isn't too carbon stiff.

  82. #7882
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    I posted about 1000 posts ago a theory regarding aluminum nipple corrosion that seems to fit all the facts.
    The basic theory if that the disc brake is generating electrons that travel down the hub and spokes to the nipples and then act as a driver to the galvanic corrosion of the nipples.
    This explains why I have zipp road wheels that are 10 years old with aluminum nipples and no corrosion (road bikes have rim brakes). Why some have lots of nipple corrosion and others hardly any (different brake pad material and different brake usage patterns) and numerous other data points that this theory fits.
    Anyway, I rebuilt all 7 of my carbon MTB wheels with brass nipples after failures in 3 wheels in less than 2 years. I also uploaded some pictures of some ugly nipples from those wheels. I only used DT aluminum nipples (black and silver) so I don't think poor anodizing is the answer to my corrosion. I am a heavy brake type of guy and generally use metallic pads. (although I have lately started using metallic front and organic rear to better balance my brakes to the amount of traction per wheel)
    So one of the few things that I agree with Enve on is that the only way to go on carbon MTB wheels is brass nipples.
    One disadvantage of brass nipples and a reason that Enve went with a really light brass design, is that brass is so strong that if you get a stick in your wheel, it would usually break an aluminum nipple (the weakest link) but now, a brass nipple might pull through the carbon rim before it breaks the spoke. The good news is that you can replace 6 of these rims for the price of one Enve.

    Sent from my Nexus 9 using Tapatalk
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  83. #7883
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    Quote Originally Posted by yourdaguy View Post
    I posted about 1000 posts ago a theory regarding aluminum nipple corrosion that seems to fit all the facts.
    The basic theory if that the disc brake is generating electrons that travel down the hub and spokes to the nipples and then act as a driver to the galvanic corrosion of the nipples.
    This explains why I have zipp road wheels that are 10 years old with aluminum nipples and no corrosion (road bikes have rim brakes). Why some have lots of nipple corrosion and others hardly any (different brake pad material and different brake usage patterns) and numerous other data points that this theory fits.
    I've thought back to your theory several times since you last posted it, and its really intriguing. There are so many variables involved in the real world that make it tough to divine the truth, I would love to see someone who wants to geek out on the topic try to measure the electron flow generated with a disc brake, different pad materials, etc......so, paging someone who wants to geek out! (Maybe we can get Meltingfeather to do it )

    Quote Originally Posted by yourdaguy View Post
    So one of the few things that I agree with Enve on is that the only way to go on carbon MTB wheels is brass nipples. One disadvantage of brass nipples and a reason that Enve went with a really light brass design, is that brass is so strong that if you get a stick in your wheel, it would usually break an aluminum nipple (the weakest link) but now, a brass nipple might pull through the carbon rim before it breaks the spoke. The good news is that you can replace 6 of these rims for the price of one Enve.
    From the info I have seen, you may want to stop agreeing with Enve on this point too. I have seen their claims that they engineered a more minimalist nipple that gives the reliability and corrosion resistance of brass but at the weight of aluminum, and part of this minimalism is shorter length (10mm). The thing is, if you look at the weight, its essentially the same as regular brass nips (1g per), and is no where near as light as aluminum nips (generally .3-.4g per), so the claim appears to be BS. One would have to assume that the Enve brass nips would have to be a bit lighter than competitors 12mm brass nips, just by virtue of being shorter, but it doesn't seem born out in the weight figures. Maybe there are rounding errors at play, but it seems awfully odd for them to do that considering how much people obsess over this stuff. See for yourself: Nipples - Wheelbuilder.com

    It sounds like you are saying that Enve also claim that their brass nips will, by virtue of their minimalist design, fail before they pull through the rim. Where did you see that claim? As I pointed out above, they don't seem to be any lighter, so unless they have some engineered failure point, which isn't visible in pics, then this seems like another BS claim on their part.

  84. #7884
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    Enve use the 10mm inverted nipples from Sapim, with the claimed weight of 0.75g to 0.77g.
    Sapim also have a shorter version of this nipples with a length of 8.5mm, don't recall the claimed weight but they should be even lighter.

    The nipples don't always fail before being pulled through the rim, in this same thread, a couple of pages back, is a example of this.
    Last edited by Aglo; 03-20-2016 at 06:10 PM. Reason: some corrections

  85. #7885
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    On my Nextie Rims I had aluminium nipples at first but they corroded, so I swapped them out with brass ones. Weird, my LBS said they had never seen that before. I was using DT Swiss Aluminium nipples.

  86. #7886
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    No claim that Enve nips might be safer, just a speculation.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

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    Hey guys, considering I have a Trek X-CAL 6 29er with the AT-650 rims, how inexpensively could I build a proper set of carbon wheels for it? I've been told that I shouldn't use my DC20/22 hubs, or factory spokes, for the new wheel-set. I don't need top of the line, but there's lots of wheels out there that are superior to the AT-650

  88. #7888
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aglo View Post
    Enve use the 10mm inverted nipples from Sapim, with the claimed weight of 0.75g to 0.77g.
    Sapim also have a shorter version of this nipples with a length of 8.5mm, don't recall the claimed weight but they should be even lighter.
    Thanks for the info. So then it sounds like most of the published weights are victims of a rounding error, since they are listed at 1g. The figures you provided suggest that they have gotten close to cutting the brass vs. aluminum weight penalty in half, which sure makes it pretty tough to justify the iffy reliability of aluminum. Having said that, the Envy nips are internal so they require removing tire and strip to true, so it is a bit of a give and take still. Plus I still think it is playing fast and loose with the facts for them to claim they match aluminum weight.

  89. #7889
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    Sapim also have the 12mm version of the same nipple, and those have the claimed/verified weight of 1g per nipple, I'm guessing people are referring to those.

    The reason I choose "no internal spoke holes" and not "internal inverted nipples" was precisely to get away from using tape, if there was a way of combining the two, that would ne nice .

    They are probably speaking of the inverted aluminum nipples they used before, they are a lot beefier than the brass ones, and longer too, so i'm guessing the weigth would be closer to the 0.75g of the shorter brass version they are using now.
    Last edited by Aglo; 03-22-2016 at 02:23 AM. Reason: To make things clear.

  90. #7890
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    (Cheap) Chinese Carbon Rims?

    Quote Originally Posted by ebsilon View Post
    Hello All

    Just finished a set of LB wheels with internal nipples - so far so good

    Rim with spoke hole for internal nipples


    Rim laced with Sapim CX Ray




    Sapim Inverted Nipple 8.5 mm w/ spoke washers






    Two wheels and SEVEN bikes




    Ciao

    ebsilon
    I have build a set with inverted Sapim 8,5mm nipples and LB hookless rims as well.

    It turned out perfect

    The first set of wheels was:

    wider-carbon-mountain-29er-rims-clincher-tubeless-compatible

    And the second set was:

    bead-hook-less-rims-carbon-29er-light-bike-rim-tubeless-compatible

    Ciao
    Ebsilon

  91. #7891
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    I had really bad corrosion on a set of DT Swiss RC28 C DB wheels. They are a carbon, disc brake wheel for road bikes and used the DT Swiss inverted alu nipple, which were absolutely destroyed in 1.5 years.
    I replaced them with the Sapim brass inverted nipples.

  92. #7892
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    Hey guys been gone for a while can someone post a link for these rims with the internal nipples and also is there anything else I should also look at?

    Sent from my SM-G935P using Tapatalk

  93. #7893
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    Quote Originally Posted by Givmedew View Post
    Hey guys been gone for a while can someone post a link for these rims with the internal nipples and also is there anything else I should also look at?
    Any rim can be drilled with a smaller hole for internal nipples if you set it up with the supplier.
    4.5mm is normal. 2.3mm for internal nipples.

  94. #7894
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Any rim can be drilled with a smaller hole for internal nipples if you set it up with the supplier.
    Which is the advantage of going to internal nipples?

  95. #7895
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrul View Post
    Which is the advantage of going to internal nipples?
    You can use lighter 8.5mm Sapim inverted brass nipples instead of 12mm regulars. You need a little longer spoke.
    So the advantage is limited. Not for me.

    Inverted | Sapim

  96. #7896
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrul View Post
    Which is the advantage of going to internal nipples?
    I think the main advantage is that the rim will be structurally stronger.
    How much stronger, and if the advantages outperforms the limitations, I don't know.

  97. #7897
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    Looking to upgrade my arch ex's on my niner jet9 rdo. Was fully set on getting the crest to help in weight. After looking and reading I definitely don't need those problems in my life. So on to Carbon it looks to help drop weight. Light bicycle seems to be the easiest site to play on. Unfortunately I don't know what the hell I need to order. I have 15ta on the front and 12/142 on the rear. I'm not wanting to break the bank. I mostly ride xc, but time to time I get aggressive thanks to strava. There are a decent amount of roots and a few logs on the local trails and that will be the more technical stuff I ride. I'm curious how the lower end hubs they offer are. I would love to keep the weight below 1625grams or less preferably. Can anyone recommend the best setup for me. I know it's hard to say without knowing my trails and riding abilities. I'm 155lbs. And ride 2-3 times a week. Also take care of my stuff. what kinda build time is it on getting the wheels. If anyone knows of a better place to order from let me know. Also the bike is a 11 speed

  98. #7898
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    You're part way there. It's really best to build your own wheelset. And a carbon rim actually makes it nearly impos..well very difficult to screw up. Because it starts off stiff and true. ~30mm id is the minimum I would build.
    I'd recommend Dt 350 J spoke hubs with the 36t star ratchet upgrade. Sapim laser spokes from Dans Comp with the free brass nipples. You'll need a Parks Tension Gauge and a 4-sided spoke wrench. Permatex Anti-Seize.
    Wheels
    CB has a 35/30mm rim at $145 + ship. Or a 35/29 Asym rim about $175 + ship that's a little lighter with 0.5mm thicker beads.

  99. #7899
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    You're part way there. It's really best to build your own wheelset. And a carbon rim actually makes it nearly impos..well very difficult to screw up. Because it starts off stiff and true. ~30mm id is the minimum I would build.
    I'd recommend Dt 350 J spoke hubs with the 36t star ratchet upgrade. Sapim laser spokes from Dans Comp with the free brass nipples. You'll need a Parks Tension Gauge and a 4-sided spoke wrench. Permatex Anti-Seize.
    Wheels
    CB has a 35/30mm rim at $145 + ship. Or a 35/29 Asym rim about $175 + ship that's a little lighter with 0.5mm thicker beads.
    25mm ID 30mm OD is fine for XC and good for weight savings. No reason to go super-wide unless you need fatter tires and many people don't. 30mm is still wider than most aluminum rims intended for the same kind of riding from just a few years ago. 35mm rims are nice though too, wouldn't be a bad idea and would be far better than Stans noodles.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  100. #7900
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    25mm ID 30mm OD is fine for XC and good for weight savings. No reason to go super-wide unless you need fatter tires and many people don't. 30mm is still wider than most aluminum rims intended for the same kind of riding from just a few years ago. 35mm rims are nice though too, wouldn't be a bad idea and would be far better than Stans noodles.
    I'm not sure the weight savings is worth it. The wider rims are 100 grams per wheel heavier, but from what I've seem you get a significantly wider contact patch. That means you can run narrower tires and get the same traction. You can save as much in tire weight as you lose in rim weight. As a quick example, the Kenda Karma Pros are 756g for the 2.2" tires and 609g for the 1.9" tires. In theory, the bigger rim gets you a 10-15% increase in contact patch so you are in the ballpark in terms of traction at a comparable weight (likely a little less traction for a bit less weight which is a reasonable trade).

    So in theory you can achieve similar weights and ride characteristics with wider rims, and have the option to put a bigger tire on to increase traction depending on where you are riding.

    I suspect I'll want the bigger tires regardless, where I ride we have a lot of loose rocks and steep climbs so traction is vital, particularly on the single speed.

    Edit: the 1.9" tire example is bad, possibly really bad. Most likely 2.2" tires are the smallest you'd want to go with wider rims

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