2019 stumpy 29 st too heavy- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2019 stumpy 29 st too heavy

    well want to lighten up this bike and wanted some help on where to go first. Wheel set group set of any ideas would help . 1k budget or so

  2. #2
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    Maxxis Rekon Tubeless with very minimal sealant should save you a bunch of weight.

  3. #3
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    Second that

  4. #4
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    Wheel set is nearly always the best bang for the buck. Getting the right tires can also be a huge factor. Depending on your stock wheel set and tires you could potentially drop 2-3 pounds going to a lighter wheel set and lighter tires and completely change the ride feel of the bike.

  5. #5
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    awesome this is exactly what I was looking for. I want to start taking this sport seriously and learn and do these things myself. I will invest in a good bike stand and have fun doing it. I am on stock specialized tires for now but will upgrade them this weekend

  6. #6
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    If it's not already tubeless, that's a good idea, but I doubt it will save much, if any, weight. tubeless tires are often thicker and the sealant is not weightless.

    the alloy handlebar and seatpost that comes with most stock bikes are often thick and heavy. a lighter handlebar probably won't do very much. if I were to recommend a replacement seatpost, it would definitely be a dropper post, which will probably be heavier, but a worthwhile upgrade.

    that leaves wheels. lighter wheels should make a bigger difference than anything. there are some great wheel options on the market right now, but I'd pick some Industry Nine Enduro S wheels. wide rims, nice US-made hubs, already taped up for tubeless use.

  7. #7
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    I'm of the opinion that weight is super overrated- especially on trail bikes. I can see the point of being weight conscious on an XC/marathon race bike, but on a 140mm+ FS bike it's IMO, pretty pointless.

    Upgrade parts because you wore out the stock or base-model stuff and want more performance, not because some bike mag or riding buddy tells you "it's heavy".

    I'll echo the above posters, wheels is where you'll get the most bang for your buck- rims, spokes and tires.
    Anything else: handlebars, cranks, saddles, droppers, etc. is a futile effort in the weight-savings game. You'll spend HUNDREDS of dollars and you won't notice a thing other than a thinner wallet.
    Shiftin' jumps and huckin' gears

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    If it's not already tubeless, that's a good idea, but I doubt it will save much, if any, weight. tubeless tires are often thicker and the sealant is not weightless.

    the alloy handlebar and seatpost that comes with most stock bikes are often thick and heavy. a lighter handlebar probably won't do very much. if I were to recommend a replacement seatpost, it would definitely be a dropper post, which will probably be heavier, but a worthwhile upgrade.

    that leaves wheels. lighter wheels should make a bigger difference than anything. there are some great wheel options on the market right now, but I'd pick some Industry Nine Enduro S wheels. wide rims, nice US-made hubs, already taped up for tubeless use.
    2-4oz of sealant is significantly lighter than 8oz of tube. Times 2. He could literally save 3/4lb on tubeless alone. Forgo the sealant and save even more. My Maxxis tires Raceface rims don't require sealant at all.

  9. #9
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    Weight is massive.

    (get it?)
    What, me worry?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by @[email protected] View Post
    2-4oz of sealant is significantly lighter than 8oz of tube. Times 2. He could literally save 3/4lb on tubeless alone. Forgo the sealant and save even more. My Maxxis tires Raceface rims don't require sealant at all.
    Running without sealant is stupid. The point above was that tubeless tires are usually thicker/heavier to ensure the proper sealing, which adds a little weight over a non-tubeless tire. Luckily, it's getting harder to buy a non-tubeless tire and you can still use a tube in a tubeless tire, but the point remains. Running tubeless rim strips, sealant and tires, you don't necessarily save tons of weight, but a bit. You also gain the advantage of the lesser rolling resistance, so there's also that benefit. It's a worthwhile upgrade, but usually not going to be the most massive, unless you are starting with running stupid heavy tires WITH stupid-heavy tubes and such.

    The issue with saving weight is that it costs a lot of money, especially when you are starting with a lower end bike where nearly everything is heavier. Good gains can be had with wheels, replacing heavy alloy low-end parts, etc., but it's usually going to cost. DT 240 hubs on a good carbon wheelset from Light Bicycle is going to be around that 1K mark and probably the biggest "felt" difference, but the Specialized Stumpy is a pretty soggy pedaling bike, so once you head up steep hills and the weight shifts backwards, it's going to feel a bit like dragging a mattress no matter what wheels you have on there. If it were my $$$, I'd be upgrading the suspension, custom tunes/cartridge for the fork and shock.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by @[email protected] View Post
    My Maxxis tires Raceface rims don't require sealant at all.
    they don't require sealant for the tire to stay on the rim. but the first time you run over a thorn, your bike goes from feeling "light" to being a paperweight that you have to walk out of the woods or shove a tube in it. riding with no sealant is a silly idea.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Running without sealant is stupid. .
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    no sealant is a silly idea.
    Guys, no it isn't stupid, many locales don't have thorns, south eastern states being one. I've never run over a thorn after leaving California, so chill out on the strong language. If running with sealant is so important, you can just discount the weight of it altogether as you should run sealant in tubes as well, and that highlights the weight savings of going tubeless even more.

    Once again, some locales don't have thorns. I've (knock on wood) not had a flat tire from a thorn in more than 25 years of riding in the southeast. Sealant isn't a necessity. That being said, I run a few ounces just in case.

    There are thorny trees and bushes in the southeast, but none on the mtb trails in Alabama and Georgia that I've rode.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by @[email protected] View Post
    There are thorny trees and bushes in the southeast, but none on the mtb trails in Alabama and Georgia that I've rode.
    I lived in Atlanta for a few years. tons of thorns on all trails. riding without sealant was a guaranteed way to get flats. there's no such thing as a locale that has no thorns, pointy sticks, sharp rocks, human-created debris that can cause flats. that's just silly.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by @[email protected] View Post
    Guys, no it isn't stupid, many locales don't have thorns, south eastern states being one. I've never run over a thorn after leaving California, so chill out on the strong language. If running with sealant is so important, you can just discount the weight of it altogether as you should run sealant in tubes as well, and that highlights the weight savings of going tubeless even more.

    Once again, some locales don't have thorns. I've (knock on wood) not had a flat tire from a thorn in more than 25 years of riding in the southeast. Sealant isn't a necessity. That being said, I run a few ounces just in case.

    There are thorny trees and bushes in the southeast, but none on the mtb trails in Alabama and Georgia that I've rode.
    But you are running sealant!
    Anyway, the weight game is money, that $1000 will be gone in a flash.
    You could go lightweight tires, depending on how far you go, you sacrifice traction and durability. That's cheapest for most weight.
    After that you're chasing things with more money. Rear cogset, cranks you can drop a pretty decent amount, but that's past your budget already. Wheelset, bars, seatpost, seat, pedals, controls.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mfour View Post
    well want to lighten up this bike and wanted some help on where to go first. Wheel set group set of any ideas would help . 1k budget or so
    Which model of the ST is yours,the lowest base model? If is the lowest model, the bottom bracket is also a boat anchor. Thou you have to replace cranks if you replace the BB, since stock is the power spline. Best Wheels and tire combo tubeless with a lighter cassette probably go after first. Then down the road do cockpit type things.

    To give you an idea, I have the base model size medium, by replacing the bottom bracket, putting SLX cranks on with Deity platform pedals, changing bars and stem, and stock tires as tubeless was around 31.5 lbs.

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