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  1. #1
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    2018 Trek X Caliber 7 Suggested Upgrades

    I recently purchased a new 2018, X-Cal 7 from the LBS, and was looking for feedback for component upgrades. I asked the mechanic at the shop his recommendations, as some of the research into the components I had done showed that the stock components were on the lower end of Shimano's parts. He suggested that I hold off on doing any swapping out of parts, as they should do fine for the time being. I plan to stick with his assessment. That said, I was looking for viewpoints on what parts to switch up to when the time does come. I do mostly flat, dirt / rocky trails, and some occasional down hill riding (never anything competitive). Also do a bit of riding around the neighborhood during the week. Link to bike: https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...ber-7/p/21576/
    Last edited by StellatedOdin; 05-03-2018 at 09:49 AM. Reason: Add link to bike

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by StellatedOdin View Post
    I recently purchased a new 2018, X-Cal 7 from the LBS, and was looking for feedback for component upgrades. I asked the mechanic at the shop his recommendations, as some of the research into the components I had done showed that the stock components were on the lower end of Shimano's parts. He suggested that I hold off on doing any swapping out of parts, as they should do fine for the time being. I plan to stick with his assessment. That said, I was looking for viewpoints on what parts to switch up to when the time does come. I do mostly flat, dirt / rocky trails, and some occasional down hill riding (never anything competitive). Also do a bit of riding around the neighborhood during the week.
    Not everyone is intimately familiar with every bike. If you want the most responses, it's ideal to provide a list of your bike's components &/or a link to the mfg'rs web description. Otherwise people have to search. Sorry I don't have time right now.
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    StellatedOdin - I have the same exact bike. Bought it in July last year. So far some of the upgrades I have done are: tubeless, new saddle, grips, smaller chain ring (28T - I live in Colorado!), different tires.

    In the near future I plan to buy new wider CF bars as I think I will like them better. I ride pretty hard at least once a week. So far, so good. If anything breaks, I will address, and upgrade, at that time.

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    Thank you for the response - I added a link to Trek's site with the specific bike. I hsould have thought of that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAWLESS23 View Post
    StellatedOdin - I have the same exact bike. Bought it in July last year. So far some of the upgrades I have done are: tubeless, new saddle, grips, smaller chain ring (28T - I live in Colorado!), different tires.

    In the near future I plan to buy new wider CF bars as I think I will like them better. I ride pretty hard at least once a week. So far, so good. If anything breaks, I will address, and upgrade, at that time.
    Thank you! I did, when I purchased it, swap to tubeless tires (idn't think to mention that when I wrote the original post). I also swapped out the saddle, but that isn't something that I was needing suggestions on (I just go for what is comfortable there). One of the issues I have had recently is that the up-shifting has been spotty at best. I have tweaked the tension on the cable, and it has improved the issue; but the rear gears seemsto go back to having issues shifting without frequent adjustments. This problem was what originally led me to asking the LBS about upgrading the shifters or derailleur

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    Quote Originally Posted by StellatedOdin View Post
    Thank you for the response - I added a link to Trek's site with the specific bike. I hsould have thought of that.
    Thanks for adding the link. Your bike has Acera shifters & derailleurs. While these aren't Shimano's highest drivetrain offerings, during my 33 years of off-road cycling I've found that most Shimano drivetrain components shift dependably regardless of where they fit in the pecking order. Lower end stuff typically just weighs a little more and lacks the highbrow badge that indicates we spent too much.

    If your shifting is spotty or coming out of adjustment frequently, I'd look at der hanger alignment &/or the condition of the cable housing. Particularly housing condition & routing. Check the ends of the housing for burrs and look for kinks or tight bends in the routing. Sometimes housings aren't installed with the fastidious care needed to ensure consistent shifting. In any case you really should not need to replace shifter or derailleur, but if you decide to do so anyway, you might get away with just replacing the shifter. The derailleur is the shifter's slave.
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    Tires.
    You should be able to fit a 2.35 at the rear. My favorite for your terrain type and speed is the XR2 Team 2.35. You can use it on the front also because it appears you don't have a Boost fork with a 15 x 110 hub wheel.
    Find out what the inner width of your rims is between the beads. If at least 25mm you can play around with lower pressure for a larger footprint and more traction. Because of its high volume and very rounded profile, 35mm is what I would want to get the most out of the XR2 tire at pressures just above rim hit level. 2.35 tires from other manufacturers may get by with less width because they have less volume and a less round tread profile.
    If you were to replace your fork you could go Boost and get a wider rim wheel at the same time. A Boost fork, except the Fox SC has added width between the stanchions for even wider 2.5 or 2.6 x 29 tires. Or 27.5+ wheels and 2.8 or 3.0 tires. Its been suggested that your frame is also used for the Roscoe 27.5+ You can get a feeling for other options by test riding or demoing one of those.
    If Demo options turn up in your area attend them and ride the different bikes. Even if you aren't thinking of one type you can get info about how the different components, suspensions and tires work.

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    100% agreeed with eb1888 on the tire. But to be clear the XR2 is still a XC tire. In more extreme conditions, its not the best tire. I switch mine out with a Nobby Nic during the Fall/Winter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Tires.
    Quote Originally Posted by jdgang View Post
    100% agreeed with eb1888 on the tire. But to be clear the XR2 is still a XC tire. In more extreme conditions, its not the best tire. I switch mine out with a Nobby Nic during the Fall/Winter.
    I agree, too. One thing we know is that stock tires (nearly) always suck unless one is buying a multi-thousand dollar bike. Good tires are expensive and mfgr's are able to save considerable money (or should I say simply compete) by spec-ing lower quality tires.

    Offering a tire recommendation... needs vary by many factors: home turf soil type, rider weight, terrain, riding style, even weather. We know a little about the OP's riding habits but enough? Maybe, maybe not. jdgang, your tire suggestions seem solid -- excellent 'all around' tires. That said I'm here in the PNWet where I prefer Nobby Nics or DHF/R in the summer and Magic Marys (soft compound/std casing) in the winter. But I weigh 200# and prefer a rowdier riding style than the OP based on what he stated.

    Finding optimum tires is complicated but worth digging and reading plenty of reviews. Possibly as important as the tire itself is figuring out optimum pressure.
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  10. #10
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    Hey guys newbie here. Just purchase my first MTB and it happens to be a 2018 X Caliber 7. I noticed that a few of you have performed the tubeless upgrade and just wondering if you used the stock Bontrager wheels and did you have any issues. Looking to upgrade to tubeless probably something from Maxxis.

    Thanks,

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