Your 29er HT do double duty as a pavement trainer?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 46 of 46
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,074

    Your 29er HT do double duty as a pavement trainer?

    Kind of a xpost from Racing & Training forum, but how many of you put in serious road miles on your 29er HT? Lock out the front fork (if you aren't rigid), swaap out tires for the days the pavement calls and then swap back for the trails. Or do you run a spare wheelset if riding the 29er HT on the road because tubeless brew is involved.

    Or have you tried that and eventually purchased a dedicated road or cross bike?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gjenkins@'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,600
    Swapping tires/wheels sucks ... even with tubes. You are probably more likely to decide not to ride if you have to swap first. Just get a cheap but quality used road bike.

  3. #3
    RYB
    RYB is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    7
    My $100 1987 Cannondale 12 speed roadie is my on road HT 29er/700c. MADE IN AMERICA and everything.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    27
    While I have a road bike ('cross bike actually), and spend a lot of time on it, I do think that a 29'r HT can make a lot of sense for training. If you race on a HT 29'r but don't have a lot of trails around, it can be hard to get your position dialed on your race bike if you don't ride it often. I will do some long road rides on my race bike w/ road tires just to make sure that my position is nailed for NUE races or 24 hr races. Nothing worse than having an uncomfortable or painful race rig when you can ride all day on your training bike.
    That being said, don't rely on changing tires, you won't. Get another wheelset with slicks on it.
    Frank Webber | Orbea USA
    Customer Service | MTB Promotion

  5. #5
    Oh Yeah Baby
    Reputation: Shocker99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    157
    I ride my rigid Dillinger on singletrack 80% of the time and on the road the other 20%. The Continental Race Kings work well on the trails and do ok for me on the pavement. Therefore, I ride.
    Misfit Psycles diSSent
    Trek CrossRip Comp

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    87
    LatelyIi have spent more time on the road with my 29er on SB8. It is 45min to the trail from house so it is easier to jump on the 29er and ride the road. Some time I would like to get a road bike for training.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    24,073
    I ride my rigid MTB on the road and if the need arises I swap out tyres for trail duty, but generally I have the Paradox for trails and only use the rigid when someone wants to come ride and I lend out the Paradox. I will have to agree with Gjenkins, in that if you have to swap tyres you're likely to opt to not ride, now if it's a simple wheel swap, then much less of a deterant and what I did for the first year I started MTBing. Currently would love to be able to swap the wheels between the Monkey and Paradox, but both don't have the 20mm TA option in the hubs and Paradox uses a 20mm TA fork. I really see no issue if funding is tight or you want to train riding the same geo and fit as you'd race, by having a 2nd wheelset with slicks on for road riding/training.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold
    You're doing mtbr wrong, you're supposed to get increasingly offended by the implications that you're doing ANYTHING wrong.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    246
    I do a lot of pavement rides on my 29er HT and do not swap tires. I mainly do this because I have some really steep streets near me that are great for hill climbing training.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    760
    I converted my 29er to a paved road bike for local paved MUPs where I do most of my training. I rode the bike with Reba and Nanos with triple up front when the local trail was dirt in bad shape and also just converted it to 1 X 9, Salsa Rigid and Vittoria Randy 32mm tires which btw measure 29mm in width. The bike is relatively fast but if keeping up with fellow roadies I have to work a bit harder. I can still ride the bike at 19mph in still air for a fair distance. I have a high end carbon Look bike with Campy for when I want to fly. If only having one bike requiring dirt road riding for a portion, it would be a 29er because of its versatility. If you must get 2 wheelsets. Alternatively if you like drop bar bikes which are quite comfortable for long distance riding...I typically ride in 30 mile sessions and you ride a combo of dirt and paved but mostly paved, consider a Cyclocross bike. This winter I will likely put the Nanos back on my 29er...or part it and build a Cyclocross...haven't decided yet...but if I keep it, will stay rigid which I really like and also love the 1 X 9 as well with 38t front chainring which in 38-11 is fast enough. I like owning both a drop bar and slightly more upright flat bar bike like the 29er for general riding including thru town.
    It looks a bit different now...have lowered the handlebar for a bit closer to a roadie position...quick look:


  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    122
    Better to find an old road bike on Craigslist. Ride as is or build into a fixie.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    I did one "road ride" on my 29'er with Big Apples. It was so slow that I actually became younger.

    True story.

  12. #12
    A Baker St. Muse
    Reputation: michael573114's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    139
    I used to do this on my GF Paragon, swapping to road wheels, but this year I switched to a FS 29er (Leviathan) and a road bike (Madone), so I stopped. I find that having specialized bikes is much better.


    (this also means the Mavic SpeedCity wheels I used on the HT are for sale - contact me if you're interested)

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: G-Choro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    585
    No. An entry level road bike is faster on the road than a retirement-busting 29er HT. Yeah, you can put skinny slicks on it. But it really isn't the same. When I only had a Mtn bike I would ride it on the road. After getting a road bike the 29er sees dirt only.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: D_Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    699
    If you want to do road only rides, I think a road bike is the way to go.

    But a lot of MTB guys are way too allergic to doing a little pavement on knobbies. Riding from the front door, and connecting up sections of singletrack and dirt road using long stretches of pavement is one of my favorite uses for a hardtail.

  15. #15
    Rollin' a fatty
    Reputation: DiRt DeViL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,861
    No, that's when my roadie comes into play.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    29
    Took me 45 mins to get work on my 29er and got passed by EVERYONE.

    Too much of a pain in the neck to keep switching tires on the 29er so I set up a hybrid with 700x38s and use it to get around town as well. Now it takes me just under 30 mins to get to work with half the effort and I pass dozens of guys on road bikes every morning.

    Geared 48/36/26 and it can really move. Still has the ability to do mild off road duty if necessary and I've been on some rather long rides with it and it's very comfortable.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    41
    Off topic a little but...

    if you live in an urban jungle like I do (Houston) it's kinda hard not to. I can ride to our inner city single track (Memorial Park Ho Chi Min) without having to rack the bike on the car. It's a long ride with a lot of curb hopping and dropping.

    So in my case my 29er is the perfect pavement trainer.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nikojan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    558
    Yup, I do it all the time. I was planning on getting slicks but havent gotten around to it yet. I get up pretty early to ride and don't usually see roadies but the one time I did, I didn't have too much trouble keeping up with him. The hardest part is getting comfortable with cars passing you at 60-80km/h. Not a lot of decent trails around here so I'm sort of afraid that if I get a dedicated road bike my new mtb will go straight to storage...
    "Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride." - John F. Kennedy

    Setup:
    11' Giant XTC 2 29er

  19. #19
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    I did one "road ride" on my 29'er with Big Apples. It was so slow that I actually became younger.

    True story.
    My wife's ring turned into coal and a dinosaur leapt out of my gas tank.

    Seriously, I'm not a big fan of riding a mtb on the road, though I still do it sometimes.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    323
    I only have one bike. My 29'er. I see no point in having another bike.

    Since I don't ride with a group on road all that matters to me is that I'm exercising. I can do that perfectly fine on my 29'er. With WTB WW 2.5's. I don't bother changing anything.

    I'll also soon be using my 29'er on a trainer & if the WTB WW 2.5 doesn't fit I'll change out the rear tire but that's it.

    Just getting back into cycling in a serious way after a bit of a layoff but when I had a 26'er it worked well enuf for training on road & also racing.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL View Post
    No, that's when my roadie comes into play.
    There's nothing like getting into that 50/11 gear on a stretch and getting that roadie up to speed. The climbs are also a lot faster.

    If all you have is one bike, go for it! But like others said, even an entry level road bike really gets going.... much more than a slicked 29er.

  22. #22
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    5,623
    Quote Originally Posted by Sometimes View Post
    ...

    I'll also soon be using my 29'er on a trainer & if the WTB WW 2.5 doesn't fit I'll change out the rear tire but that's it.

    ...
    The WW 2.5 will absolutely HOWL on a trainer.

    But I have an ATB (as opposed to a MTB). I ride it everywhere and I pretty much hate slicks because I can't seem to stay on the pavement anyway. Pavement is a necessary evil to get where I'm going.
    Maxxis Ignitors seem to have a pretty good balance of on-road wear resistance and off-road traction, so those are my road tires.
    I keep a set of slicks in case someone invites me on a road ride. These work only because my bike has a 44T chainring, otherwise the gearing would be too low with the skinny/small tires. The worst thing about a 29er MTB on the road is that your aero position is not very good. But that doesn't really matter unless you're on the clock - which I never am when I'm riding.

    -F

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    88
    I do it all the time, 17 miles last night almost 30 miles last Saturday. Actually just ordered a new wheel set from lacemine29 for the knobbies so I can ride on trails, hit the road off to another set of trails without swapping tires. I have slicks on the stock wheels and use my 29er HT for commuting too.

    Best bike in my opinion for what I ask it to do.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    544
    Yep, I hate driving my car or truck to the trailhead so I usually pedal there. That means 8 miles of paved road/greenways and another 7 miles of sandy fire roads before I even hit the woods. For that reason I try to run tires with a center ridge to smooth things out a bit, especially in the back.

  25. #25
    Big B's Trails
    Reputation: ImaFred's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,740
    Quote Originally Posted by D_Man View Post
    ......
    But a lot of MTB guys are way too allergic to doing a little pavement on knobbies. Riding from the front door, and connecting up sections of singletrack and dirt road using long stretches of pavement is one of my favorite uses for a hardtail.
    I agree with this... too many riders think Mtb rides are limited too a trail or trail system or only dirt.... I have found it to be quite pleasurable to do rides that are a mix ... You can get more creative with your rides/loops too and add quite a bit of mileage
    I dig dirt!

  26. #26
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,731
    I ride both of my 29er's on the pavement with the same rubber as the trails (tubeless RaRa's) and pass plenty of roadies eheheh.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OmaHaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    643
    I commute on mine in the summer. 28x2.0 Specialized Control LK's. My rig is rigid, 1x9.

    ??

    I don't do roadie a$$-hatchet rides. If I do large group rides, it is usually on dirt or crushed limestone paths, and it is usually to grab a beer.
    - The only thing that keeps me on a bike is happiness.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bob12676's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    215
    Sure do! I have a 90's Cannondale road bike hanging in my basement but I prefer my HT 29er with a cheap set of slicks. I rode the 51 mile Zoo-De Mack on my 29er this year and it was great, I kept up with (and passed) many a high end road bike on the trip. Now I just leave the slicks on the stock rims with an old cassette, change over takes about 2 minutes.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    440
    I have 2 wheelsets for my 29er, one with tubelss fatties and the other with cyclocross tires.

    I also have a carbon Trek Postal 5200 road bike hanging in the garage, but usually pull out the 29er and switch wheels if I'm going on a <20miles road ride.

    I find the 29er to be much more comfortable, and the weight penalty isn't the end of the world.

    Plus, with the cyclocross tires, I can take some of the lesser known routes...gravel roads and even some of the tamer trails to make the total ride a little more interesteing and fun.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,294
    How about 29er with road compact and 9/10 speed cassette. Should be great for dirt and road if you can only have one bike.

    I like having designated duties for my bikes. dirt. road. One bike to do all usually sucks at all.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    332
    I ride my 29ers to the trail, and sometimes to class which is usually less than a mile away. I have a road bike too that doesn't really fit me and has a broken deraileur. It was my dads and I haven't gotten around to fixing it up. Mountain bikes are much more comfortable, but if you want to get some where road bike is the way to go.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: brentos's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,787
    On flat pavement without wind; at threshold, time after time... I only average 1 mph faster on my road bike (between 4% and 5% faster) than my 29er hardtail (2.25" Racing Ralphs).

    The road bike is for sale. The small difference in speed may be unique to me though as the difference in speed sounds greater for those who have replied.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    20
    I only have one working bike right now. I have my old Centurion Elite road bike from the mid 80's that is a set of tires/tune away from being road worthy after I drop a few more lbs. I don't find the 29er that hard to ride on the road and the extra work is a good thing for now.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    23
    We do a lot of greenway/road group rides to the watering hole. Depending on where we start its 8-15 miles one way. Most everyone brings a 29er. Just swap the tires to semi slicks or cross tires and alls good. Usually average 13-16 mph. If you got it, ride it and have fun.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zipperland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    13
    I own a Fuji cross bike that has been doing double duty on road and light trails. I am waiting for my new 2012 Trek Cobia to come in so I can start hitting the trails much harder. Should be here sometime in September.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: canyoneagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    261

    ...that depends...

    ...on what you mean by "training".
    If you want to do group "club" road rides (typically 18-23MPH pace), a road bike would be better suited for that task.
    That said, a 29er could be converted over to a relatively fast road-oriented bike, but it would require some effort to change the bike back and forth between road and off-road duty.

    If you're wanting to commute or head out for some uptempo recreational riding (i.e. similar route to the "club" rides, just not in an organized racing-oriented ride), I think a 29er would be great. Throw some big apples on and have a blast.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    31
    Bought a road bike for a triathlon or two. I put a few miles on it, but I just hated riding the damn thing.

    After a little lay off, I started roading it again for the quick cardio after work, and while staring at the wall with the bikes hanging there. I rode the 29er instead. Way more comfortable from the bars to the seat, to the seating position. Pretty much wore out the Mt Kings that were on it. I tried out a set of road tires on it, then put a set 700x38s on it and couldn't be happier. In fact, I sold the road bike as I just didn't ride it anymore. Good riddance.

    I had a nice carbon rigid fork on it, but I went back to the heavy suspension fork (locked out). Not the fastest thing, and it's sure heavy, but having to try harder to go faster just makes the workout better... and the trails easier. I hate road riding, but the cardio is undeniable. Not to mention the convenience.

    If I were racing it would be a different story.

    So... the 29er with road tires is awesome, lol.

  38. #38
    www.bigrobracing.co.uk
    Reputation: robdeanhove's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    312
    I now own a dedicate road/training bike. It also has a powertap hub fitted. The extra control and constant cadence/effort possible on the road means real, structured training can be done. All mountain bike rides end up as just "going for a ride" junk miles and the only structure that can really be put in is short intervals.

  39. #39
    IFSDlxSS IFTiFLWMtb GFAdv
    Reputation: Spidey-Lag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    242
    Yes! This is exactly what I do. I have a dedicated race bike which I use as my around town training bike. For the road I use my WTB 29er Vulpines (which I also use for trail rides depending on the weather and trail conditions). More often than not, on the trail I use knobby tires; Ignitors or Aspens mainly.

    Road going Vulpine Semi slicks on ZTR/CK wheelset


    Everywhere else Aspens on ENVE/CK wheelset


    My last road going venture on the vulpines - Sunday Aug 14


  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by Spidey-Lag View Post
    My last road going venture on the vulpines - Sunday Aug 14
    Which app is that? Looks nice (and nice bike too...)

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,035
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    There's nothing like getting into that 50/11 gear on a stretch and getting that roadie up to speed. The climbs are also a lot faster.

    If all you have is one bike, go for it! But like others said, even an entry level road bike really gets going.... much more than a slicked 29er.
    48x11 gear with 29x2.1 tires is about the same gear inches as 53x11 on 700x23c tires. With my Nanos pumped up to 60psi and riding on the nearly continuous center tread my 29er can feel quite fast. The biggest difference that I feel is that it is never as explosive feeling because of the higher inertia of the heavier wheels. It's got speed but no giddy acceleration like a real road bike.

    That said, with enough speed I can certainly feel the difference in air drag from my body position and the wide tires. IMHO you can get pretty close with a rigid 29er if you put on some 28-32c slicks (as appropriate for the rim size) and larger chainrings but it's harder to do too much about the taller and wider body position that will hold you back if you really want to hang with the roadies.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    137
    I hate riding my mountain bike on pavement, but I'm a road biker too, so I'd recommend getting a good dedicated road bike for road riding. My rule of thumb is 1 trail mile = 2.5 road miles.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sanjuro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,005
    I like rolling my 29er ss around town. I still got about 1500 feet of climbing on a 20 mile casual ride.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Spidey-Lag View Post
    Yes! This is exactly what I do. I have a dedicated race bike which I use as my around town training bike. For the road I use my WTB 29er Vulpines (which I also use for trail rides depending on the weather and trail conditions). More often than not, on the trail I use knobby tires; Ignitors or Aspens mainly.

    Road going Vulpine Semi slicks on ZTR/CK wheelset


    Everywhere else Aspens on ENVE/CK wheelset


    My last road going venture on the vulpines - Sunday Aug 14

    Philippines?

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,091
    I rebuilt my 700c Hybrid for commuting to work about 45km round trip on roads and tarmac track. Got a load of second hand road parts and the Shimano flatbar shifters (105 triple 50T chain ring, 10 speed ultegra cassette and RD) also got a new set of road training wheels built on 105 hubs running 25mm Maxxis road tires at 115psi. I've got to say I prefer the riding position to an out and out roadie and it is 25% quicker time wise than taking my Air 9 with 2.25 Ralphs. I would say that the smaller increments on the road cassette make a big difference for this type of use as you keep pedaling with the same cadence and maintain speed through gear changes better than an MTB Cassette. It is also a lot faster on the few uphill sections. Won't be going back to commuting on my MTB any time soon

  46. #46
    IFSDlxSS IFTiFLWMtb GFAdv
    Reputation: Spidey-Lag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by rasse1977 View Post
    Which app is that? Looks nice (and nice bike too...)
    Thanks. Cyclemeter. Really really cool app. It even gives you the details per kilometer or mile, Time splits, Avg spd per km/mph, nice maps, etc. I think it was only something like $2.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmxrocksya View Post
    Philippines?
    Yep, correct.

Similar Threads

  1. Double duty - xc/dh
    By Castle Rocker in forum Ibis
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-01-2009, 01:10 PM
  2. Help me tailor Inbred for double duty
    By onkel in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-01-2009, 05:52 AM
  3. Forge MStreet for double duty?
    By Clumpy Rump in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-23-2009, 06:07 AM
  4. double duty rims? disc and rim brakes.
    By 207maine in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-10-2007, 06:30 PM
  5. bike bags doing double duty in the office??
    By westin in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-31-2007, 03:56 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.