Why is tire clearance so tight.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Why is tire clearance so tight.

    On most frames, FS or hard tail chainstays are just long enough to get a 2.25 on. Is it because the needs of racers and race weenies control the design of frames? The real needs of real mountain bikers differs from racers. The best way to go: Get a custom builder.

  2. #2
    CB2
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    Racers in New England want tire clearance.

  3. #3
    Formerly of Kent
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul29er
    On most frames, FS or hard tail chainstays are just long enough to get a 2.25 on. Is it because the needs of racers and race weenies control the design of frames? The real needs of real mountain bikers differs from racers. The best way to go: Get a custom builder.
    The vast majority of people on this (29er) forum clamoring for shorter chainstays have never pedaled a bike in anger.

    And, I'm just a racer, and not a "real mountain biker", so take my second-class opinion with a grain of salt.


  4. #4
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    This is one of my pet peves as well. Give me 1/2" longer chainstays and more tire clearance any day, on any frame, road or MTB and I will be happier. The benefits far outweigh any drawbacks, IMO.

    On my bikes equiped with horizontal dropouts, I've ridden with the axle at both the extreme forward and rearward positions, and the effect on handling is very small. I would guess most riders would not notice the difference.

  5. #5
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul29er
    On most frames, FS or hard tail chainstays are just long enough to get a 2.25 on. Is it because the needs of racers and race weenies control the design of frames? The real needs of real mountain bikers differs from racers. The best way to go: Get a custom builder.
    Tire clearance has always been tight. Rider tire width preferences have tended to outpace the frame designs. Even XC racers are now using tires that were considered DH width 15 years ago.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkmother
    This is one of my pet peves as well. Give me 1/2" longer chainstays and more tire clearance any day, on any frame, road or MTB and I will be happier. The benefits far outweigh any drawbacks, IMO.

    On my bikes equiped with horizontal dropouts, I've ridden with the axle at both the extreme forward and rearward positions, and the effect on handling is very small. I would guess most riders would not notice the difference.
    The silly thing to me is that longer stays aren't even a requirement. A bike designer really can have it both ways if they try, but like shiggy pointed out they usually just aren't trying to push that envelope.
    My Inbred has 17.25" stays when the wheel is moved all the way forward and still fits 2.3" tires with room to spare. I know there are custom bikes out there with much shorter stays that fit at least the same size tires.

    BTW, for wheels-on-the-ground XC riding I can't tell a difference either between 17+1/4 and 17+3/4 on my bike. But I do notice is when I start taking jumps and drops and generally getting playful

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn

    BTW, for wheels-on-the-ground XC riding I can't tell a difference either between 17+1/4 and 17+3/4 on my bike. But I do notice is when I start taking jumps and drops and generally getting playful
    Not trying to be contrary, but what do you notice, out of curiousity? My riding is definately more XC/tires-on-the-dirt type stuff, so I'm out of my element.

  8. #8
    is buachail foighneach me
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    the shorter the stays get, the easier it is to get the front end off the ground. it is noticeable. the karate monkey can run full gears and a 2.4" tire at just over 17" as well. if you don't jump/play/ride really tech stuff, then longer chainstays are a benefit i would think. but then again, if you don't do that kind of stuff, what do you really need big ass tires for?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    the shorter the stays get, the easier it is to get the front end off the ground. it is noticeable. the karate monkey can run full gears and a 2.4" tire at just over 17" as well. if you don't jump/play/ride really tech stuff, then longer chainstays are a benefit i would think. but then again, if you don't do that kind of stuff, what do you really need big ass tires for?
    yep, pretty much all that i would have said. Front end is much easier to lift, which in turn makes it easier to not just fall off a drop one wheel at a time but to get the bike up and airborne. Also makes it easier to manual up obstacles. Also makes the bike feel more "nimble" (a much more subjective aspect)

    There are definitely pluses to longer chainstays too. Some more stability, especially at speed, the bike feels a bit comfier in the rear, and other things

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