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  1. #1
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    What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?

    Hi, new here.

    I was wondering if you guys could share your experience with rigid MTBs or give me some pointers because i'm considering building one.

    The story. I've had a full suspension MTB in the past. I quickly realised it was overkill for the terrain we have here. No mountains, just small hills. Blasting down on singletrack was fun, but when there are only a few trails and the descends last from about 30 seconds to a minute, it gets boring pretty quick. Doing any kind of distance riding with this bike sucked.
    Then I got a road bike and rode that for a while. Kind of boring, got hit by a car...
    About a year ago i've built a gravel bike because I wanted a more comfortable road bike that could also do light offroad stuff. Steel frame and fork, Rival 1 groupset, Hunt wheels, 43mm Panaracer GravelKing SK tyres. Pretty sweet machine. I used the bike more and more offroad and realised that we have all kinds of dirt roads that I can ride for days if I throw in a bit of asphalt to connect them. After some time I rode more dirt than pavement.
    Problem is, rougher dirt roads are SO jarring on my gravel bike, it's torture. At 30psi I constantly bottom out the front tyre. Sadly I went with TRP Spyre cable discs, and even after upgrading the pads and switching to compressionless housing I still don't feel like they're powerful enough for offroad stuff, i'd like hydros.

    I love drop bars and quirky bikes so I thought about getting a new drop bar frame that can accept a 2.1 27.5 tyre. There are more and more of these frames, but it's still kind a niche market, and the frames can be so expensive. I'd need a new frame, new wheels, new tyres, and new brakes.
    That's almost a new bike, and drop bar hydros are ridiculously expensive.

    So I thought about building a sensibly priced XC hardtail. I see very nice looking new aluminium XC frames for not a lot of money. I'd throw on a Deore M6000 2x10 groupset, Hunt XC wide wheels, 2.35 Vittoria Mezcals or something similar and I think i'd end up with a pretty sweet bike. Just as a comparison for the price of Rival 1 hydros you can get an entire M7000 SLX groupset WITH brakes.

    Now comes the fork. I thought about going rigid with a Chiner carbon fork. But I don't know if I need big tyres AND a suspension fork, or just big tyres. Even though i'm not a weight weenie i'm sure the bike would end up in the 10kg range with the rigid fork which is pretty sweet.
    I want to use the bike on dirt roads, forest roads, some short singletrack segments, gravel, small paved sections. Nothing super rocky, just bad quality uneven, not maintained dirt roads with big holes etc.
    On terrain like this, what absorbs most of the hits, the tyres or the fork? Is it stupid to go rigid? Should I just get a suspension fork right away like a Reba or something? Even though it's only about a 130-150 bucks, i'd rather not spend the money on a rigid fork and then just throw it out.

    Thoughts?

    I live in a small town, no decent LBS, no demo days etc.

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the site, Greg. I'm sure you will get a ton of different opinions.

    I have been enjoying my 2x10 rigid XC bike as much as my other bikes lately, if not more. I have recently done a handful of 50-70 mile mixed gravel and pavement rides on it, as well as setting a climbing PR or 2 on single track. The rocky single track descents are slower than on my other hardtails, but not drastically so. My first dozen or so mountain bikes were all rigid, so the feeling is familiar.

    I have a second set of wheels fitted with 700x35 CX tires for this bike, but find that running the 2.3/2.4 tires at higher pressure for gravel and pavement works just as well. My biggest complaint with this setup is the gearing is too low. I need to upgrade to a larger chainring up front.

    The frame is Reynolds 853 steel and the fork is a Surly Ogre fork. I have a Reba that came on the bike, but have been satisfied with the rigid fork my current use of this bike.

    What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-1114181534a.jpg

    What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-1005181228a.jpg
    Last edited by sgltrak; 3 Weeks Ago at 03:12 PM. Reason: spelling typo

  3. #3
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    Sounds like a good bike and rigid sounds good imo. Now you are 5% of the way. Then...
    Go for the most uneven. Take the rough part. Aim for the worst hits. Make wheelies. Go while it's raining and snowing. Go in darkness. Take risks.
    All while you shout loud.
    Share the experience with someone.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for sharing, the bike looks sweet!

    I'd also add that i'm definitely not the racey type, I ride for fun, and I care more about comfort. BUT if a rigid fork would be enough for my needs and I could spend less money and drop a bunch of weight compared to a suspension fork i'll take it...

  5. #5
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    I did this to my '11 Lynskey Ridgeline:



    It's great. It's fast, capable of going on whatever sort of terrain you like, and is a ton of fun. To make it more versatile, 2 wheelsets would be wise. One 2.3/2.4 knobby set, and one 1.9-2.0 fast, hardpack set. That said, mine has 1.95 Renegades on Havens, and it can do quite a lot without issue. It weighs right about 10kg with Havens, 1x hydraulic XT/Ultegra, and a heavy but smooth steel fork. It'd be easy to drop a decent amount with lighter wheels and a carbon fork. On that note, I would not get a suspension fork for your intended use. It's unnecessary and will probably just be annoying. Relatively fat tires on gravel are more than enough for a smooth, grippy ride.

    So, I'd recommend picking up an older steep-ish 29" XC HT frame, drop bar the thing with a short stem, and have fun. As was mentioned, the one snag can be gearing, depending on how you ride. I can only fit a 38t chainring on mine, and I run out of revs from time to time. I'm sure that varies with frame designs though.

  6. #6
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    A rigid mountain bike?!? Only a lunatic would want one of those. Naturally that's where I spend most of my time.

    It's not just for smooth trails either. I love and prefer, chunky technical trails. It's also my race bike for anything under 2 hours.

    What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-unnamed-1-.jpg

    What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-unnamed.jpg

    What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-unnamed-5-.jpg
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  7. #7
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    I just sold my FS for the same reasons. I've been riding my Kona Unit for a few months, and I love this thing. 2.4/front 2.2/rear - rigid steel fork. 1x11 - 11-42 rear. SLX everything else.

    Its an amazing bike, and riding rigid is fun, if you are not bombing down rock gardens which I don't. Actually sold the FS to get another rigid which may eventually become a HT.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-12kona.jpg  

    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
    Kona Unit

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    riding rigid is fun / Actually sold the FS to get another rigid
    What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-56bab19f9ec60f568ff081cce165948f4a0149d80a35e4fdf080c8c097efaec8.jpg
    Trek Emonda | Transition Sentinel | Transition Scout

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg225 View Post
    Hi, new here.

    I was wondering if you guys could share your experience with rigid MTBs or give me some pointers because i'm considering building one.
    Everything. You can everything and anything, albeit maybe a bit faster on the uphills and slower on the downs.

  10. #10
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    Also note, you can get a suspension fork for your gravel bike most likely. There are a few on the market.

    But, sounds like your intended use is pretty well perfect for a rigid mtb.

    The way I've always thought about it, is that tires soak up small, chattery bumps in the trail/road better (if I had to throw out some sort of guideline, I'd say probably half the tire height or so...stuff where tire deformation basically makes it disappear), but suspension starts to take up the slack for larger discrete hits.

  11. #11
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    Evidently, you can prop them up against trees and rocks in the wilderness
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  12. #12
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    Use it to run for groceries, ride to work, chase your roadie buddies on the paved bike trails, ride your trainer, take your kids for a ride in a tow behind trailer, spare bike for guests who donít know how to ride.

    Iím sure there are other uses for a rigid bike

    Edit: I forgot one, rigid bikes are great for bike tosses!
    Last edited by Nurse Ben; 3 Weeks Ago at 12:41 AM.
    XMed GG Smash 29/27+ (Frameset For Sale)
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  13. #13
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    Thanks for the responses everyone! Now i'm pretty sure i'm going to try rigid first.

    The title might sound a bit cheeky, that wasn't on purpose I swear!

    Thanks for the drop bar MTB suggestion too, I thought about it a lot in the past, but for a few reasons right now I just don't want to do it. Drop bar hydro prices, shifter compatibility etc...
    The Salsa Cutthroat is one of my dream bikes tho.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Also note, you can get a suspension fork for your gravel bike most likely. There are a few on the market.
    To be honest I don't understand these gravel forks. I'm guessing you're talking about the MRP Baxter, or the FOX AX, both of them are 40mm. When I look at these all I can think about is that these things bottom out before they could actually do something (and they weigh as much as 100mm forks). Haven't ridden one, but a few reviews seem to confirm my suspicions. As I said I like quirky bikes and i'd love to try one, but i'm not sure if i'd spend my own money on one of these forks.
    Another problem is that both of them have tapered steerers and my frame is a straight 1 1/8. And then there is the price... 800-900 bucks. Throw a pair of hydros on top of that and i'm almost at 1500, and i'm still stuck with small tyres.
    I haven't done the math a 100% yet but i'm pretty sure I could build the entire XC bike I want with a rigid fork for around 1500.
    Last edited by Greg225; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:02 AM.

  14. #14
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    This isn't exactly what you asked but another way to go...
    I also used to ride a fully and now I ride a rigid Surly Krampus. I like it more than the FS bike. The 29x3 tires are beasts.
    Also, my stepson has an aluminum Kona 29er that he had a low end Rockshox on and it was ok. A few years ago after I discovered how awesome plus was, I got him a Surly fork and a 3" front tire. He already had 35mm rims. At first when I was swapping the parts, he thought I was crazy. I assured him if he didn't like it I would put the suspension fork back on. That fork is still in the basement. Plus front works really nicely.
    I like turtles

  15. #15
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    OP, welcome. As this dude said, love my Unit, been riding that pretty much exclusively since I got it this time last year, couple nice FS bikes sitting there if I want to. Have mine set up as a 29+, thing can handle pretty much anything you are willing to give a go, except I'd say jumps/drops over a couple feet, i.e., I ride it on all the trails the guys are riding on 130mm> travel bikes, only thing I don't do is the big jumps, but handles nice smooth drops <3ft just fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    I just sold my FS for the same reasons. I've been riding my Kona Unit for a few months, and I love this thing. 2.4/front 2.2/rear - rigid steel fork. 1x11 - 11-42 rear. SLX everything else.
    Its an amazing bike, and riding rigid is fun, if you are not bombing down rock gardens which I don't. Actually sold the FS to get another rigid which may eventually become a HT.
    As to building, I'd highly suggest that you don't and instead buy a complete, maybe even a complete Unit with 1x11 as they're on sale right now on Jenson for $1k. Nice thing is, you have loads of options in terms of setup, you can run it SS or geared, 650B+, 29" or 29+, but getting it to work with drop bars would be a pain as the HT is a bit short.

    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  16. #16
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    I'll back what's been said so far. Honestly, there's nothing I would ride on my FS XC bike that I won't ride on a rigid XC bike. Yes, I might go a little slower through some chunky sections, but in terms of cleaning a technical section, I'm just as successful on the rigid bike as the FS bike. If it seems appealing, go for it. If you decide you'd rather have a suspension fork on it after a season or whatever, then you know the answer to your question, and you can get a fork. But, as you seem interested in trying it, I'll predict you'll like it, and be happy you did it.

  17. #17
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    Plus looks very very interesting and i'd like to try a plus bike someday. But i'm a bit afraid to jump on one without trying it on the terrain i'd like to ride. Sometimes i'm forced to ride road sections to connect offroad bits. Even though i'm not racing anyone, wouldn't a plus tyre be super draggy on pavement?

    I checked out the Kona and the Surly Krampus a while ago. I like both of them and i'll always have a special place in my heart for steel bikes (my current bike is steel) but for a change i'd like to go with aluminium and carbon on this build.
    That Kona looks really sweet for a grand, unfortunately i'm accross the pond.

    Sadly I know that financially it's not the best decision to build a bike. I've built my current gravel bike from the frame up. It came out pretty expensive although with some components I made the wrong choice and later replaced them...
    However I looked around and it seems like XC hardtails and front derailleurs are not very cool and trendy at the moment, so there are some deals to be had.

    I'm a bit weird. I would like to keep the bang to buck ratio up, but I also really really enjoy pieceing bikes together.

  18. #18
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    Really I have taken my Rigid SS where enduro bikes go, plenty of double blacks without any problems, it takes more skill and you go alot slower but when you accomplish challenges most can't do on your rigid it's a pat on the back. Long bumpy rides are the most uncomfortable on a rigid but after riding all over AZ and UT I will go for my rigid every time. The reason why I stopped buying suspension bikes really

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Driverfound337 View Post
    Really I have taken my Rigid SS where enduro bikes go, plenty of double blacks without any problems, it takes more skill and you go alot slower but when you accomplish challenges most can't do on your rigid it's a pat on the back. Long bumpy rides are the most uncomfortable on a rigid but after riding all over AZ and UT I will go for my rigid every time. The reason why I stopped buying suspension bikes really
    What kind of forks are you using on your rigid bikes?

  20. #20
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    Suspension is designed to be progressive, so a short travel fork has the same function as a longer travel fork; you donít bottom out easier, you just have less travel.

    If you have limited funds, Iíd get a complete.

    A really good bike that would work rigid, hardtail, even SS is a Trek Stache. You can get used for cheap, aluminum or carbon, run 29+, super agile, very versatile. Start rigid and go from there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg225 View Post
    Thanks for the responses everyone! Now i'm pretty sure i'm going to try rigid first.

    The title might sound a bit cheeky, that wasn't on purpose I swear!

    Thanks for the drop bar MTB suggestion too, I thought about it a lot in the past, but for a few reasons right now I just don't want to do it. Drop bar hydro prices, shifter compatibility etc...
    The Salsa Cutthroat is one of my dream bikes tho.



    To be honest I don't understand these gravel forks. I'm guessing you're talking about the MRP Baxter, or the FOX AX, both of them are 40mm. When I look at these all I can think about is that these things bottom out before they could actually do something (and they weigh as much as 100mm forks). Haven't ridden one, but a few reviews seem to confirm my suspicions. As I said I like quirky bikes and i'd love to try one, but i'm not sure if i'd spend my own money on one of these forks.
    Another problem is that both of them have tapered steerers and my frame is a straight 1 1/8. And then there is the price... 800-900 bucks. Throw a pair of hydros on top of that and i'm almost at 1500, and i'm still stuck with small tyres.
    I haven't done the math a 100% yet but i'm pretty sure I could build the entire XC bike I want with a rigid fork for around 1500.
    XMed GG Smash 29/27+ (Frameset For Sale)
    Lrg Fezzari Signal Peak 29+
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  21. #21
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    Trek Bowie Carbon fork came on my Trek Superfly, discontinued now unfortunately, my steel bike has a chinese carbon that costs way to little for what I do to it but its solid so far. Some are better than others out there, if i did it right I would buy a whisky if I was doing carbon again. Like everything else Axle Crown measurements determine fork and boost non boost.....

    Good Carbon https://whiskyparts.co/forks/no9_mtn_15mm_fork
    Cheap Carbon Tandell Carbon 27.5+ Rigid Fork
    Steel or Carbon https://salsacycles.com/components/category/forks

  22. #22
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    Anything and everything. At one time, all bikes were completely ridgid. I am still riding my 93 Bridgestone MB1 with lugged Tange Prestige frame. Although originally sold as a cross country race bike with short WB and wicked fast geometry, mine was used for commuting to work during the week and mountain trail riding on the weekends. I also used it for a three month tour of New Zealand and riding road centuries. Five years ago, it retired to the Sierra Nevada mountains with me, and I use it for riding single track and gravel forest roads. Itís been completely reliable, never had to walk home, and I am still waiuting to break my first spoke.

    My LBS thinks I am masochist, who new. I ordered my first bike with any suspension except for tires this morning. Itís a 2019 Santa Cruz Chameleon hardtail. I am not sure what itís good far, how reliable it will be, or how long it will last.

    Ordered a 2018 Chameleon this time last year, but cancelled my order when SC missed their third shipping date. Hoping to get the 2019 next week and starting to find out.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    A rigid mountain bike?!? Only a lunatic would want one of those. Naturally that's where I spend most of my time.

    It's not just for smooth trails either. I love and prefer, chunky technical trails. It's also my race bike for anything under 2 hours.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    What fork is on that nice looking SS? Looks like a Whiskey?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Driverfound337 View Post
    Really I have taken my Rigid SS where enduro bikes go, plenty of double blacks without any problems, it takes more skill and you go alot slower but when you accomplish challenges most can't do on your rigid it's a pat on the back. Long bumpy rides are the most uncomfortable on a rigid but after riding all over AZ and UT I will go for my rigid every time. The reason why I stopped buying suspension bikes really
    Yep. Youíre not alone with your assessment and experience. And youíre only a bit slower on the downs.

  25. #25
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    For some reason there is a lot of rigid bike fandom among singlespeeders. All of the bikes I have owned over the years have been steel singlespeeds and I've spent 75% of my riding with a rigid fork. I ride most of the same trails with folks on FS bikes and I can usually keep up. I like the simplicity and direct, predictable feel of the rigid fork. Mild trails become a little more challenging, slow chunk seems easier, and fast dowhills can be just scary. I've used Surly, Salsa, and currently a Vassago rigid fork. Soma makes a nice one too. No crabon on my bike.

    I would not recommend slapping a drop bar on any mountain bike. If the bike was designed around a flat bar and for someone your height, the drop bar will make it feel crazy-long.

    I too had TRP Spyre brakes. Compressionless housing is an obvious necessity with and mechanical disc brake, but the pads sucked. I replaced them with Shimano pads and they worked just as good as any hydros I have ever used.

  26. #26
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    Definitely try plus I guess, I can;t stand plus bikes after riding 4 of them, it's 29x2.35 for life for me

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    Big fan of rigid steel bikes. My favorite bike is my Surly 1x1. If I had 29" tires I wouldn't even consider a suspension fork for where I ride.

  28. #28
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    Rigid XC 29ers are awesome. I ride two rigid single speed 29ers and setup a geared one for certain rides as well (less weight than a suspension fork)... rode the Pittsburgh Dirty Dozen on the geared rigid setup (and made it up all of the hill climbs w/o dabbing/crashing or stroking out lol). I tend to run a 3.0" tubeless front tire (at ~12-15 psi) for a bit of cush most of the time.

    Main thing to watch out for when riding rigid is the "feedback" through the handlebars when bombing down descents. Early on in my experience I darned near sprained both of my wrists from all the rattlin & shakin goin on
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  29. #29
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    There is a Potts on a certain website right now that may end up being a great deal if you are on the taller side. If I was taller this would be my third. I have been on mine for 7 years now and have no desire for another day to day bike. I have been getting an itch for something in the 160 range again but no way my Potts will ever leave my stable.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKamp View Post
    There is a Potts on a certain website right now that may end up being a great deal if you are on the taller side.
    This is weird. Just post a link, why the cryptic innuendo?
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  31. #31
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    Didn't think I could post a link (not sure why). Pretty simple though, search ebay for Steve Potts. Not my bike, no affiliation, too big for me otherwise I would have another one.

  32. #32
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    Another one here voting that you go for a rigid fork, based on the description of your trails. Also, I think you should splurge a bit / commit a bit and get a nice CF fork. And a Boost one that can take a wide tire. (2.8 or so.) In 4 years or so you can always change to a suspension fork if you think you need to, but suspension definitely takes some of the fun out of "mild" trails.

    I've been on full suspension for 17 years because the northeast U.S. area I live is pretty rough, but on some trails the bike is over capable for the trail and kind of takes the feeling out of it. Also, on those trails I feel like I'm on a 5-lb heavier bike than I should be. A nice whippy light bike is awesome on a flowy level trail. So, here in northeast U.S. I ride full supension, but still love to get out on this old staple (below) a couple times a year. I keep it at my wife's home in El Paso. Full rigid, 26", 35 psi in the 2.2 tubed tires. :-) Despite being used to full suspension, I love getting out on this bike.

    What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-franklin-mts_xmas.jpg
    Have fun!

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    Thanks everyone! Lot's of great info, i'm pretty commited on going rigid now.

    There is a very nice aluminium XC frame for sale. Not gonna say what it is or where it is so no one buys it before me. Brand new from a shop, big brand, 2017 model, beautiful hydroformed tubes, thru axle, routing for a direct mount side swing FD, plain old XC geo. PF92 BB which i'm not that stoked on... It's cheap for what it is IMO.

    However i've been eyeing the Salsa Timberjack for a long time now... That frame is definitely more expensive (always happens), but it's still reasonably priced, and it's way more awesome. 3 bottle cage mounts!

    So i've been thinking about going with a Timberjack, the same Deore M6000 groupset, slightly wider 30mm ID Hunt wheels, 29x2.6 Vittoria Mezcals or something similar, and one of the newer Chiner boost forks with oodles of clearance. I think I coud still keep it budget and build up a fun bike to my preferred specs for not a lot of money.

    We'll see.
    Last edited by Greg225; 2 Weeks Ago at 03:17 AM.

  34. #34
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    Pay attention to the fork length on modern bikes before slapping a rigid fork on it. The Timberjack was designed around a 120-140mm suspension fork, which has an axle-to-crown length of 500-540mm, depending on how you measure. Most rigid forks are 480mm long. Using a shorter fork that what the manufacturer had in mind will steepend the head tube, lower the stack height, lengthen the reach, and drop the BB closer to the ground. That may or may not work.

    If you're using a 480-490mm fork, I would pick a frame that was designed around a 100mm fork, or something that already has a very high bottom bracket to mitigate the affects of the shorter fork.

  35. #35
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    My old steel Niner MCR9 would've made a great "monstercross" bike. Monstercross is not my thing, but I rode that bike with a flat bar on every kind of terrain, and covered more than a few road/path/doubletrack miles on it. I think I had it down to 25# with a fairly budget build (3X crank, BB7s, etc.)

    If you want something more plush, but still rigid, there is now a fairly decent assortment of 29+ tires out there. It is a bit extra to drag around with you, but just an option. You need a 29+ frame, of course.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Pay attention to the fork length on modern bikes before slapping a rigid fork on it. The Timberjack was designed around a 120-140mm suspension fork, which has an axle-to-crown length of 500-540mm, depending on how you measure. Most rigid forks are 480mm long. Using a shorter fork that what the manufacturer had in mind will steepend the head tube, lower the stack height, lengthen the reach, and drop the BB closer to the ground. That may or may not work.

    If you're using a 480-490mm fork, I would pick a frame that was designed around a 100mm fork, or something that already has a very high bottom bracket to mitigate the affects of the shorter fork.
    Salsa recommends 483 to 502 crown to axle on rigid forks on their web page. I have been looking at a Surly Krampus boost steel fork for my Timberjack but wonder if 483mm will make it the bb too low (specially since I am running 27.5+, not 29)

    Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk

  37. #37
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    I've ridden quite a few Rigid bikes, rigid bikes turned hardtail with a XC Fork, and single speeds... I wouldn't own one unless it is Steel or Carbon. Not a fan of the aluminum frames personally. I am a Chromoly guy 100% however I've ridden a few carbon single speeds that were flat out rockets on the flowy stuff, and they turn in really fast!

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gurpil23 View Post
    Salsa recommends 483 to 502 crown to axle on rigid forks on their web page.
    You can get an idea of what that will do with this tool: https://bikegeo.muha.cc

    Check how much that might drop the BB and compare that to the BB height of their other Timberjack frames. IMO, anything lower than 12" from the ground is probably irresponsible.

    That might lower the BB drop such that the bike we'll be overly stable and no fun to wrangle.

    You will notice that frames designed for loaded touring have very low BBs because that makes them stable. That's fine for grinding out long miles on roads or smooth hardpack but it's a liability on any sort of technical trails.

  39. #39
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    Remember if the bike is based on a 120mm-140mm fork, they expect you to be riding around with it 20% squished. So, 95-110mm. So, a rigid fork can be shorter than the suspension fork a bike might come with.
    Have fun!

  40. #40
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    Rigid has it's place for sure. I prefer it sometimes, especially with at least a 29x2.6 tire. Plus tires and rigid were made for eachother.

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    Yeah I know that the Timberjack comes with 120-130 forks, I assumed I could run it with a 480-490mm rigid based on the official specs.

    Salsa says:

    Suspension fork length (travel): 511-541mm (100-130mm)

    Rigid fork length: 483-502mm


    Quote Originally Posted by Gurpil23 View Post
    Salsa recommends 483 to 502 crown to axle on rigid forks on their web page. I have been looking at a Surly Krampus boost steel fork for my Timberjack but wonder if 483mm will make it the bb too low (specially since I am running 27.5+, not 29)
    Not that it means anything but this guy is running a Krampus boost fork (with 29x2.6 tyres):



    I know I shouldn't consider this as a big deal but it looks so dumb. But it's a nice fork for sure, not too expensive, and not even that heavy for steel. My steel gravel fork weighs more.

    Niner RDO on a Timberjack Ti:

    Niner Carbon MTB Fork Review (RDO BOOST) - BIKEPACKING.com

  42. #42
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    Yes, no one is arguing that you canNOT use a rigid fork on a Timberjack. You can put a rigid fork on any bicycle. The question is, is it a good idea?

    If the rigid frork drops the BB so low that it makes the bike hard to shift your weight around to match the terrain (lower that 70mm of drop might do this) or puts the pedals so close to the ground that it significantly increases pedal strikes (lower than 12" might do this), then it's a bad idea.

  43. #43
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    If I were the OP, I would be looking a Krampus anyways.

    https://surlybikes.com/bikes/krampus
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
    Kona Unit

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Yes, no one is arguing that you canNOT use a rigid fork on a Timberjack. You can put a rigid fork on any bicycle. The question is, is it a good idea?
    Sorry, i'll rephrase then. I thought it wasn't such a big deal considering how i'm planning to use the bike (aka distance riding on not exactly technical terrain). I'm not here to argue, i'm here to learn.

    I've found some Chiner forks in the 500mm AC range tho. This style:

    https://www.diycarbonbikes.com/colle...=2135201067835

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    If I were the OP, I would be looking a Krampus anyways.

    https://surlybikes.com/bikes/krampus
    Did you get yours yet??
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Did you get yours yet??
    I would think it would be posted ALL over the site lol!

    Should be ready this week, following up with the shop later, I really was expecting last week.
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
    Kona Unit

  47. #47
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    What is your budget? And I agree, take a look at the Surly's. I ride a Karate Monkey, setup
    as 29er, rigid, single speed and 1x10. Awesome, fun bike. and you can configure them any way you want to.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg225 View Post
    Yeah I know that the Timberjack comes with 120-130 forks, I assumed I could run it with a 480-490mm rigid based on the official specs.

    Salsa says:

    Suspension fork length (travel): 511-541mm (100-130mm)

    Rigid fork length: 483-502mm




    Not that it means anything but this guy is running a Krampus boost fork (with 29x2.6 tyres):



    I know I shouldn't consider this as a big deal but it looks so dumb. But it's a nice fork for sure, not too expensive, and not even that heavy for steel. My steel gravel fork weighs more.

    Thanks for sharing that. Not that I am looking down to the fork while riding, but that is an ugly combination :/

    Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk

  49. #49
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    Personally, I like rigid, even though I'm currently riding around on a 100mm suspension fork, mostly for the endurance factor. I waffle back and forth, swapping out forks as I see fit.

    As far as "what can I ride?"....Well, you can ride anything you want, just don't expect to win any Strava KOMs, which isn't a factor for a lot of folks.

    Rigid forks have charm, it's just that the strength is in precise, consistent handling and a very light front end, vs speed. There's also a perk of no maintenance. You don't need to go full-plus, but a 2.8 or 3.0 front tire is a *huge* help in enjoying a rigid fork.

    I do all kinds of dumb stuff just fine on a rigid fork. I've posted this pic a few times here:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What can you do with a fully rigid 29er XC bike?-img_0244.jpg  

    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  50. #50

  51. #51
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    Reading the OPs posts is like talking to myself. Very similar situation, so this thread has been fun! (I'm building up a monstercross bike, with the Spyres. Will see how those work out.)

    To the OP: on your gravel bike, you could always consider one of these: https://redshiftsports.com/shockstop-suspension-stem.

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