What can I safely do witty bike?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Newbie to Mountain Biking
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    New question here. What can I safely do witty bike?

    Hey guys. As I'm sure some of you know I just
    Got a bone stock diamondback overdrive expert. Got it out together, rode for about 3 hrs and then did some last minute adjustments today. Few questions. I'm 6'/230. What can I safely do on this bike? How safe are the sr suntour xct mlo v3 100mm shocks? What can't they do? Any other helpful tips would be appreciated. So far te only thing I want to change is that seat.

  2. #2
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    Because the fork will bounce and flex as it hits several closely spaced obstacles like roots and rocks and log piles, speed is what will lead to poor tracking. Tight curves will be tough at speed. So you will need to use a lot of braking. The rear will seem inadequate for control on downhill singletrack sections. Slow will equal safe.
    Tires also make a big difference in grip and rolling speed. Anything over 30psi in your oems will add to the bounciness. Racing Ralph performance tires from Cycleclubsport would help.
    Fabien Barel has a skills video to watch if you can find an active link.

    You will be ok on pavement, bike paths and wider forest and country roads.

  3. #3
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    The front fork is the weakest link but if you max out the preload and know what you are doing it isn't an impossible problem.

    On the other hand, if you do NOT have a reasonable amount of experience ( ie. you are basically a beginner) then you will need to get used to the bike on basic, simple paths and learn how it feels to you before attempting anything technical at all.

    Ultimately investing another $150-200 in something like an entry level Rockshox fork will improve things considerably..

    BlueSkyCycling.com - Rock Shox XC 32 TK 29er Coil Fork
    ~ 2014 Breezer Lightning Team '29
    ~ 2012 GT Sensor Expert 9r
    ~ 2017 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Comp

  4. #4
    Rogue Exterminator
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    I am also a noob with the same bike (although I am 55lbs lighter)

    The bike isn't bad, just take it easy and develop your skills.
    Currently, the bike can probably handle much more than we as noobs can give it.
    Sure, it is entry level but it isn't a walmart bike.

    I can however, see the weakness in the forks.
    Don't know if I will ever upgrade them though or just buy a new bike in a year or so and sell this one. Call me crazy, but I just don't know if I want to put a $500 fork or a bunch of other expensive upgrades on a $460 bike. Not that there is anything wrong with that if that is what you want to do but I personally just bought this bike because it was an affordable way to see if this was a sport I wanted to get into.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    I am also a noob with the same bike (although I am 55lbs lighter)

    The bike isn't bad, just take it easy and develop your skills.
    Currently, the bike can probably handle much more than we as noobs can give it.
    Sure, it is entry level but it isn't a walmart bike.

    I can however, see the weakness in the forks.
    Don't know if I will ever upgrade them though or just buy a new bike in a year or so and sell this one. Call me crazy, but I just don't know if I want to put a $500 fork or a bunch of other expensive upgrades on a $460 bike. Not that there is anything wrong with that if that is what you want to do but I personally just bought this bike because it was an affordable way to see if this was a sport I wanted to get into.
    This is good advice I spent as much on my first bike in upgrades as it cost originally...then went and bought a new bike that was much better-a 2002 Kona caldera (it had disc brakes and a nice set of bombers on it ). I would have been better just to put the money into the new bike.

    Mountain biking is inherently dangerous and every bike can break. But it's an awesome and rewarding sport and lifestyle. Good luck and enjoy the ride.

  6. #6
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    Normal singletrack with some rocks and roots will be fine too. Just riding the trails (rather than trying to go really quickly or 'get air') will be fine, but you will reach the limits of a cheap bike sooner than a middle of the road one.

    Learn to ride and enjoy the experience. As you get better the limits of the bike will become obvious, especially if you try one or two friends' ones. Then upgrade the whole rather than piecemeal.
    Rimmer - "There's an old human saying - if you talk garbage, expect pain"

  7. #7
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    Made me think of an icy black diamond with moguls. Scary but you can get down it.

  8. #8
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    There has been some good advice so far, you will learn the limits of you bike the more you ride it. Once you find yourself reaching those limits, or wanting to ride at those limits......it's time to upgrade.

  9. #9
    I like bikes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuzukiGS750EZ View Post
    Hey guys. As I'm sure some of you know I just
    Got a bone stock diamondback overdrive expert. Got it out together, rode for about 3 hrs and then did some last minute adjustments today. Few questions. I'm 6'/230. What can I safely do on this bike? How safe are the sr suntour xct mlo v3 100mm shocks? What can't they do? Any other helpful tips would be appreciated. So far te only thing I want to change is that seat.
    Well, they are a coil sprung 28mm steel stanchion and steel steerer fork. Steel steerer and stanchions makes them fairly strong as well as heavy. As far as snapping them, I dont think they are any weaker than any other fork out there. Actually, i'd say they are stronger than sub $1k forks with aluminum 1-1/8" steerer tubes and alum stanchions that go for lightweight. As for squashing the coil spring guts. that's all you need to worry about. All that would happen is they drop and bottom out or get stuck halfway and rub the stanchion tube.

    As for what you can do safely...I think your wheels and hubs are more problematic than your forks at this point with your weight. I think you have Alex wheels and Shimano hubs??
    I've hit 5ft drop offs with my suntours and they didn't bottom out or make any noise. Close to bottoming but havent. I'm 6'3" and 190lbs. My Alex wheels however have needed straighteneing after every run so far. they are just about wiped after just 100miles. i guess you can say I'm pretty hard on the trails.
    I think you'd be in over your head before your forks would give you trouble unless you cosistently beat on your bike pretty hard and neglected it with leaking seals..etc

    Technically speaking, the Suntour XCT fork you have as well as the wheels you have are for Hybrid bikes and easy trail. they arent meant for XC or DH, so what your asking is not really what they are made for.
    Karakoram...ZS44, X-Fusion, Freq i23, Tioga's, Shadow & XT,Shim Hydro 180/160, MG-1 pedals & more.

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