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  1. #1
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    upgrade components or buy a new bike?

    So I have a 2011 Trek Marlin 29er, I liked it at first, still do, but would like a smoother / better ride. I thought Id change components to build my own Superfly Al Elite.
    Changed the fork to a Fox CDT now brakes to the Avids BB7, have better pedals and grips.
    Was wondering if I should keep upgrading components to essentially arrive at a Superfly Al Elite setup or just go out and buy a Superfly Al Elite for $2300?
    Any input is appreciated of pros / cons.
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I'm little OCD about what I want, so I tend to upgrade components first then replace the frame, because even if I get a new bike with better components, I wouldn't like it unless I have exact part I want on it. But what you want is to have exact set up as Superfly, then it would be cheaper to buy a whole new bike - and you'd get some money out of it if you sell your current bike, which you wouldn't be able to do if you upgrade components and then replace the frame.
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  3. #3
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    thanks, yeah essentially thats what I'm doing, want to Superfly Al Elite but with Mechanical discs :-) I'm somehow reluctant switching and getting hydraulics while they may have better stopping power service them when broken I don't trust myself. And seems more pricey to service them. But everything else I like to go with a SRam X7 Groupset.

  4. #4
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    SLX/XT brakes are a signifigant step up from BB7s and avoid the Avid problems.
    You will find many threads with info backing this up in Brake Time. Maintenance info is easier with mineral oil. Many how tos are out there and they require less than Avids. Mechanicals are not adjustment and maintenance free. With all that it won't take much to go through the learning curve and you can always hang out at your lbs for the procedure they use for the first time.
    The Fox fork is the most maintenance intensive and complicated out there. If you go with that and do your own work brakes will be a side job you do before breakfast.
    A Manitou Tower Pro is more user friendly and tunable.
    The wheelset needs upgrading also.
    So a common case is to get the fork brakes and a wheelset for your existing bike. Maybe carbon bars and a shorter stem. Ride it and get quite a bit of additional skill development. Then take those parts to a better frame for the next step. Nothing wasted.

  5. #5
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    The question is how attached are you to this bike? While you might find a few tapered steerer G2 offset 15qr Fox forks, you aren't going to easily find one with a 1 1/8" steerer G2 15qr. I don't think there is a current Fox with all three, so you're likely looking at a Reba or a takeoff Fox from an older model. Having 15qr forks on race hard tails is a brand new thing and two years ago you would only find them on full suspension bikes.

    IF you don't care about retaining the stock geometry then by all means buy whatever fits. The rest of the bike is pretty much easy to come by. The Shimano stuff can all be had near bike shop cost and the Bontrager Mustang wheels are pretty weak for what the bike is supposed to be. The rims are great. The Mustang is basically a 32h version of the Race Lite. Tubeless with the Bontrager wheels is a no brainer. The weak part of the wheels is the hub set. They are just basic formula hubs. I don't mean to say that these are bad wheels or anything; they're great tubeless wheels. What I mean is that they aren't anything to write home about.

    So if you want that specific fork and frame geometry it could be easier to sell the bike you have; however, if you just want something pretty close you could have a similar bike but It won't cost you much less unless you go with ebay take offs.

  6. #6
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    thanks guys, I decided yes its better to get a REAL Superfly
    Just got back from the LBS with a 2012 model Superfly carbon, got a great deal on it.
    Now what to do with my "new" Fox CDT I had on my Marlin?
    Sell it or have them swap it out, the 2012 came with the "older" Fox Evolution Series 32 Float 29 RL?
    Only problem is the new one is white while the one that is on the bike matches the color black.
    Thanks

  7. #7
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    Tested a Carbon Superfly last year, Pro? think? Awesome ride, found myself laughing at technical climbs which required a 100% focus to clear on the 26er (old) I regularly ride.

  8. #8
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    The Superfly has a tapered steer tube. I assume your CTD fork you have has a non tapered steer tube so you would have to get a new head set. It seems most people keep the new CTD forks in the trail setting.....with that being said I would just keep the Fox fork that came on the Superfly and sell the CTD.
    2017 Santa Cruz Tallboy CC

  9. #9
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    BTW good choice on the Superfly. Long term $ wise it was a better decision. Plus you enjoy a better bike in the short term
    2017 Santa Cruz Tallboy CC

  10. #10
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    I think the stiffness of the Tapered steerer tube would benifit more than the CTD. Like I said most people dont mess with the CTD settings. They just set it to trail mode and ride it.
    Last edited by stygz1; 02-09-2013 at 01:44 PM.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frugaltravelguy View Post
    So I have a 2011 Trek Marlin 29er, I liked it at first, still do, but would like a smoother / better ride. I thought Id change components to build my own Superfly Al Elite.
    Changed the fork to a Fox CDT now brakes to the Avids BB7, have better pedals and grips.
    Was wondering if I should keep upgrading components to essentially arrive at a Superfly Al Elite setup or just go out and buy a Superfly Al Elite for $2300?
    Any input is appreciated of pros / cons.
    Thanks
    I just went through this same thing. upgrade my 26er voodoo or buy a new new bike...
    I went with a new bike, Yeti Big Top 29er, and I'm going to convert my voodoo to a single speed.

    You could sell your marlin to fund the superfly. Or you can re-purpose the marlin

    Also, I have a brand new 2013 float 29er 15qr 1.5 taper for for sale.
    I have an add on pb

  12. #12
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    Yeah, I kept the 'entry' bike after swapping out a bunch of components and then ended up buying a new bike anyway. Wish I would have just used the $$ on components to build the new one! Oh well, live and learn and go in debt!

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