Trek Superfly 9.6 2015 vs Specialized Stumpjumper HT Comp Carbon 2014 which one?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Trek Superfly 9.6 2015 vs Specialized Stumpjumper HT Comp Carbon 2014 which one?

    I'm new to mountain biking but live in a great area for trail riding straight from my door. I'm not going to be racing or doing jumps/tricks etc.

    I can get a deal tax free deal at work which significantly reduces the price of a bike. I want to get the most advanced I can afford so as not to have to upgrade in the near future.

    I can get the two bikes above for exactly the same price 1600 at Evans cycles in my size.

    Trek is full price and latest model, Specialized is reduced to 1600 from 2000 but is 2014 model.

    Both look very similar to me but I am very new and know little about the differences in spec. List below

    Wondered if anyone had any advice

    Phil




    Trek Superfly 9.6 2015 Mountain Bike

    1600.00


    Specialized Stumpjumper HT Comp Carbon 2014 Mountain Bike

    1600.00
    <strike style="color: rgb(119, 119, 119);">2000.00</strike> Save 20%!


    Frame OCLV Mountain Carbon, Carbon Armor, E2 tapered head tube, BB95, balanced post mount, Closed Convert dropouts, G2 Geometry on 29er FACT 8m carbon, 29" geometry
    Fork RockShox Reba RL, Solo Air spring, rebound, Motion Control remote lockout, E2 tapered steerer, 15mm Maxle Lite, custom G2 Geometry w/51mm offset on 29ers, 100mm travel RockShox Reba RL 29
    Gears Shimano XT/SRAM X7 Derailleurs with a Custom SRAM carbon S-1250 Chainset
    Brakes Shimano Deore hydraulic disc Formula C1, hydraulic disc
    Weight Not Specified
    Front Derailleur SRAM X7 SRAM X7, 10-speed, 34.9mm clamp, top pull
    Rear Derailleur Shimano Deore XT, Shadow Plus Shimano XT Shadow Plus, 10-speed, SGS long cage
    Number of Gears 0 20
    Shifters Shimano Deore, 10 speed Shimano SLX, 10-speed, trigger
    Chainset FSA F2000 Custom SRAM S-1250, 7050 alloy arms, 10-speed XC double, PF30 spindle, S: 170mm, Others: 175mm
    Chainrings 36/22 38/24T
    Bottom Bracket BB95 SRAM PF30, OS press-in bearings, sealed cartridge
    Cassette Shimano HG50 11-36, 10 speed SRAM PG-1030, 10-speed, 11-36
    Chain KMC X10 SRAM PC 1031, 10-speed, PowerLink
    Brakeset Shimano Deore hydraulic disc
    Pedals Resin Test Ride
    Front Brake Formula C1, alloy calliper, metallic pad, 15.5"/17.5": 160mm, 19"/21": 180mm rotor
    Rear Brake Formula C1, alloy calliper, metallic pad, 160mm rotor
    Brake Levers Formula C1, hydraulic disc, tooled reach adj
    Handlebars Bontrager Low Riser, 31.8mm, 5mm rise Specialized XC, flat bar, 2014 butted alloy, 700mm wide, 8-degree backsweep, 31.8mm
    Stem Bontrager Race Lite, 31.8mm, 7 degree Specialized XC, 3D forged alloy, 4-bolt, 6-degree rise, 31.8mm clamp
    Headset FSA IS-2, E2, alloy cartridge 1-1/8 and 1-1/2" threadless, Campy style upper with 1-1/2" lower, cartridge bearings
    Grips Bontrager Race Specialized Sip Grip, light lock-on, half-waffle aramid-infused, 15.5"/17.5": regular, 19"/21": XL thickness
    Rims Bontrager Mustang Elite Tubeless Ready 28-hole Roval 29, alloy disc, 26mm wide, 32h
    Front Hub Bontrager sealed cartridge bearing, 15mm alloy axle, centrelock Specialized Hi Lo disc, sealed cartridge bearings, 15mm thru-axle, 32h
    Rear Hub Bontrager sealed cartridge bearing, alloy axle, centrelock Specialized Hi Lo disc, double-sealed cartridge bearings, QR, 32h
    Spokes DT Industry Stainless, 3X front/rear 2.0
    Front Tyre Bontrager XR1 Expert, Tubeless Ready, aramid bead, 29x2.20" (Bontrager XR2 Expert, Tubeless Ready, aramid bead, 27.5x2.20") S-Works Fast Trak, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.0", foldable aramid bead, 120 TPI
    Rear Tyre Bontrager XR1 Expert, Tubeless Ready, aramid bead, 29x2.20" (Bontrager XR2 Expert, Tubeless Ready, aramid bead, 27.5x2.20") Specialized Fast Trak Control, 2Bliss Ready, 29x2.0", foldable aramid bead, 60 TPI
    Tubes Ultralight PV
    Saddle Bontrager Evoke 2, chromoly rails Body Geometry Phenom Comp, hollow Cr-Mo rails, 143mm
    Seatpost Bontrager Elite, 2-bolt head, 27.2mm, 5mm offset Specialized 2014 butted alloy, single bolt setback, 27.2mm, 15.5/17.5" 350mm, Others: 400mm
    Seat Binder Specialized 7050 hard anodised alloy, single bolt, 32.6mm

  2. #2
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    I like the idea of latest bike and life long frame guarantee with superfly but wonder if the specs of the stump jumper are better as the original price was 400 more

  3. #3
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    The SF has very dialed geo, stable hitting things on the downhills and quick steering in switchbacks. The best I've been on. The Stumpy can be twitchy.
    It has engineered compliance that will keep you from being beat up riding gnarl. You won't be thinking fs until you want to ride big jumps. Stumpy is not on pare. Alma and Les are other options.
    The SF has a weak crankset. It is difficult to keep tightened. M615 Deore or SLX are upgrades. The brakes on the Stumpy need an upgrade.
    The frame is more developed than the 9.9SL from one year earlier. The curved seat tube allows 435mm chainstays. 445 on the SL.

  4. #4
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    I am in the middle of the same type of decision. I like both, the Stumpy I believe will be a bit more aggressive for racing but I don't do podiums therefore I might as well have more fun on the trek. The bikes I am looking at are the Superfly 8 alloy with full SLX and the Stumpjumper alloy with a little bit of a mix. Gee, tough choice.

  5. #5
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    eb1888 thanks
    Sounds like the SF is probably good for me as a novice.
    thanks

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by philnewby View Post
    Sounds like the SF is probably good for me as a novice.
    Because of it's compliance and handling you'll keep it much longer than an inexpensive aluminum ht many novices choose.

  7. #7
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    Sorry for resurrecting such old thread, but, I have almost exactly the same question one year latter.

    The only difference is that in my case I found the Superfly 9.6 and the Stumpjumper HT Comp Carbon, both 2015, at the same price.

    So, in this case, both being 2015 and both at the same price, which one will be the best buy?

    Many thanks in advance.

  8. #8
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    For 2016 Trek has dropped the crankset for a Shimano M627 22/36. I would also get the shop to swap the skinny XR1 Expert tires for XR1 2.2 Teams. This bike, with the right tires, has 70% of the rear compliance of the ProCaliber SL. A great ride.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    For 2016 Trek has dropped the crankset for a Shimano M627 22/36. I would also get the shop to swap the skinny XR1 Expert tires for XR1 2.2 Teams. This bike, with the right tires, has 70% of the rear compliance of the ProCaliber SL. A great ride.
    So, the 2015 trek SF 9.6 is a better ride than 2015 Specialized SJ comp carbon?
    I'm pretty much limited to this 2 options at the moment.

    Cheers.

  10. #10
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    Trek by a long shot.
    -No Shortcuts

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCunha View Post
    So, the 2015 trek SF 9.6 is a better ride than 2015 Specialized SJ comp carbon?
    I'm pretty much limited to this 2 options at the moment..
    Yes because of the engineered rear compliance so you don't get beat up on long rides with rocks and roots and because of the slacker head tube angle geo. The ht>, 51mm fork offset and 435mm chainstays give you a stable bike hitting rocks going fast downhill while turning quick in the switchbacks.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Yes because of the engineered rear compliance so you don't get beat up on long rides with rocks and roots and because of the slacker head tube angle geo. The ht>, 51mm fork offset and 435mm chainstays give you a stable bike hitting rocks going fast downhill while turning quick in the switchbacks.
    eb1888, thanks very much for all your help and tips!
    I would love to buy the 2016, but will take months to arrive in my country (the official Trek distributor will not sell the 2016 until December 2015).

    So, my main concerns, according with your tips, are related with the crankset and the tires, right?

    I've found the Bontrager Team Issue XR-1 and XR-2. This will not be a problem.

    But I can't find any Shimano crankset with 36/22T.
    The closest I've found was the M675 SLX or the M785 XT at 38/24T configuration.
    I'm almost considering change all the groupset to a XT M8000 1x11...

    What do you think I should do?

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by MCunha; 08-11-2015 at 09:35 AM.

  13. #13
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    Trek.

    I regret buying my Stump Jumper.

  14. #14
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    I'm not a fan or user of doubles. Too much shifting of the front derailleur for my short ups and downs.
    For my terrain I use a triple SLX M670 on my 9.8 and stay in the middle 32 front gear for most trail riding. That's about 95% of my riding with the time on rolling flat two track around my park's trails a good time to use the big ring(42) and crank up the speed for some fun passing guys with doubles.
    If you get the SLX triple you can remove the small and large rings and use shorter bolts to make it a perfect chainline single anytime for 1x10 or 11.
    For XR1 Team tires get the 2.2 version.
    Other worthy upgrades you can do anytime include a RCT3 A3 damper. It's got metal shims and doesn't pack up on fast downhills.
    It's an easy 10 minute no oil change drop-in swap. You get better small bump compliance also. It's on ebay.

  15. #15
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    Hi again guys!

    First, I like to thanks all your comments. Because of then I crossed out the stumpjumper from my list. I think you saved me from a lot of trouble (I was 90% sure about buy this one)!

    But now I have a new "problem".
    Regarding the information I have, some 2016 Trek models will be available in about 40 days. Will be difficult, but I think that I can wait that long....

    This is the deal: the models already available in 2015 will NOT arrive until they sell all units (or almost all); but, in other hand, the new models, like the procalibrer, will be available soon (or almost soon)!

    So, I have a new dilemma: buy the SF 9.6 2015 and make all the upgrades, or buy a PC 9.7 2016 and change only the tires???

    What you guys would you do in my place?

    Proportionally, the PC 9.7 2016 have a good price in my Country. It is 33% more expensive than SF 9.6 2015, or only 20% more expensive than SF 9.6 2016 (this one will not be available this year at local stores). Just to have an reference, in North America the PC 9.7 2016 is 45% more expensive than SF 9.6 2016 ($2,399.00 against $3,499.00).

    But lets go to my dilemma:
    With the price difference between the two (from 2015 SF 9.6 to 2016 PC 9.7) I could do several updates with zero wait (I can get the bike in 2 days).
    For instance, I can upgrade the group to Shimano's M8000 1x11, the tires, the Reba's RCT3 A3 damper.... But still a SF 2015 frame against a procaliber 2016 frame...
    With the Procaliber 9.7 I will make no upgrades (maybe switch the skinny XR1 Expert tires to the XR1 2.2 Teams).

    What you guys think about this? Is the procaliber that superior to a superfly?

    Many thanks in advance!

  16. #16
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    The Procaliber is Trek's higher end carbon hardtail frame on level with the Superfly carbon SL frame. The SF 9.6 uses the next level down frame. This weighs a little more and doesn't have internal cable runs. The Procaiber can use a PF92 bb to allow 30mm cranks like the Next SL which is not the case with the 9.6. The Procal has Boost rear spacing for more tire clearance and 'future' compatibility. It also has a larger 31.6 vs 27.2 seatpost size for easier dropper post compatibility. I haven't demoed one so I don't know how the IsoSpeed coupling rides compared to the 9.6. It is reported to have 11mm of compliance. The 9.6 has 70% of that.
    If you can fit it into your budget, it is probably the better choice pending a ride. Make sure you get the right size.
    The 9.7 also needs the RCT3 A3 damper upgrade.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    The Procaliber is Trek's higher end carbon hardtail frame on level with the Superfly carbon SL frame. The SF 9.6 uses the next level down frame. This weighs a little more and doesn't have internal cable runs. The Procaiber can use a PF92 bb to allow 30mm cranks like the Next SL which is not the case with the 9.6. The Procal has Boost rear spacing for more tire clearance and 'future' compatibility. It also has a larger 31.6 vs 27.2 seatpost size for easier dropper post compatibility. I haven't demoed one so I don't know how the IsoSpeed coupling rides compared to the 9.6. It is reported to have 11mm of compliance. The 9.6 has 70% of that.
    If you can fit it into your budget, it is probably the better choice pending a ride. Make sure you get the right size.
    The 9.7 also needs the RCT3 A3 damper upgrade.
    Thanks again eb1888.
    I closed the deal yesterday, ordering the Procaliber 9.7. But the wait is going to kill me. LoL

    Now I will order the RCT3 A3 damper and the tires.
    Any other suggestions?

    Cheers.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCunha View Post
    Thanks again eb1888.
    I closed the deal yesterday, ordering the Procaliber 9.7. But the wait is going to kill me. LoL

    Now I will order the RCT3 A3 damper and the tires.
    Any other suggestions?
    Eventually when the Dt 350 Boost 6 bolt 110 front and 148 rear hubs become available on one of the German sites like bikecomponents, I'd lace up some 35/30 Chinese carbon rims like those from Nextie, Carbonbicycle or one of the others with Sapim Laser spokes and brass nipples. It's a dead easy build because of the stiffness of the carbon rim. You need a Park TM-1 tension gauge and a good 4-sided spoke wrench. The hubs will probably be available near year end. I use those with XR1 Team 2.2 or similar sized tires for great fast rolling traction. Hibike is another German site that will carry the hubs and also has the tires under Bontrager.

  19. #19
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    eb1888 I just picked up a 2015 9.8 superfly looking for some suggestions on tire pressure and pressure for the rock shox sid. I have the 2.2 team issues set at 28psi. Fork is another story. I have always been a fox guy. Do I really need 130psi? I weigh 195lbs w/gear.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOE-BEE View Post
    eb1888 I just picked up a 2015 9.8 superfly looking for some suggestions on tire pressure and pressure for the rock shox sid. I have the 2.2 team issues set at 28psi. Fork is another story. I have always been a fox guy. Do I really need 130psi? I weigh 195lbs w/gear.
    You have some work to do to get a good ride out of the fork because of the poor functioning damper of the RL level.
    I replaced the compression damper with a RCT3 A3 version available off ebay for $100. You need a couple small size allen keys and a 24mm 6-point socket to pull the old one and remove the lockout. Then slowly pull up the damper so the oil drips back down. Pop in the new one and set it at open. Then your psi can be 75+ depending on your terrain. Front tire pressure could be 20psi with 25 in the rear. If you feel rim hits add psi. The fork has two bottomless tokens on the air side. I run three. These are what allow you to run a lower overall pressure because they ramp up the end of the stroke.
    RockShox Sid RCT3 A3 Compression Damper Motion Control DNA Crown Adjust Black | eBay

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    Set up tubeless. Fork seemed harsh on rooty trails.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOE-BEE View Post
    Set up tubeless. Fork seemed harsh on rooty trails.
    Lowering your front tire pressure, going to a high volume tire, using your very good tire on a 30mm interior wide rim will help that because you can then lower the tire pressure to 15psi.
    Lowering the fork psi to 75 will help that.
    Swapping out the RL damper will help that and keep the fork stable on faster bumpy downhill trail segments.
    The RCT3 damper has metal shims, so ultimately you can tune that high speed compression damping to what you want like on a Manitou Tower Pro.

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    Thanks for your help eb 1888!

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