Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    15

    Too many bikes to choose from! Need help!

    I need some help determining which bikes to consider for a new ride. I currently have a 2017 Trek Procaliber 9.7 but want to move into a full-suspension - I am 6'1", 240lbs, mid-40s and not going to get much faster at this age but I love this sport. I love my current bike but the hard-tail is shaking my teeth out. Cross-country is most of what I ride but due to weight, may need more travel so I am considering Trail bikes too.

    NEEDS: Carbon - want to stay as light as possible, full suspension, cost not really an issue but want to stay less than $10k, efficient climber (I'm old and fat), need as plush ride as possible but not so much that it will not climb or is a constant pogo. Lastly, I have no real allegiance to a mfg or brand but want the after the sale support in the event I have issues.

    WANTS: I would like to stay in a 29" wheel - feels better over mild bumps. I want a more plush ride considering I ride over a fair amount of rock and roots here in the Dallas/Ft Worth area. Want a large sized bike but not unwieldy. Want a cool looking bike but functionality is the key.

    I appreciate your expert help in advance!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: d365's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,006
    Ibis Ripley LS
    Devinci Django
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
    Pivot 429 Trail

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    470
    Quote Originally Posted by Scoutdog44 View Post
    I need some help determining which bikes to consider for a new ride. I currently have a 2017 Trek Procaliber 9.7 but want to move into a full-suspension - I am 6'1", 240lbs, mid-40s and not going to get much faster at this age but I love this sport. I love my current bike but the hard-tail is shaking my teeth out. Cross-country is most of what I ride but due to weight, may need more travel so I am considering Trail bikes too.

    NEEDS: Carbon - want to stay as light as possible, full suspension, cost not really an issue but want to stay less than $10k, efficient climber (I'm old and fat), need as plush ride as possible but not so much that it will not climb or is a constant pogo. Lastly, I have no real allegiance to a mfg or brand but want the after the sale support in the event I have issues.

    WANTS: I would like to stay in a 29" wheel - feels better over mild bumps. I want a more plush ride considering I ride over a fair amount of rock and roots here in the Dallas/Ft Worth area. Want a large sized bike but not unwieldy. Want a cool looking bike but functionality is the key.

    I appreciate your expert help in advance!
    For your needs a 29+ matches your description. Sticking to the FS plan, look for something with a pedal platform that is part of the shock valving and linkage design.

    In 2001 my back was hurting on longer rides so bad I was considering staying off the trails. I decided that I needed a FS bike. I bought one and rode it until 2010 when I bought another.

    Then I got a fat bike thinking it would be a snow bike as a second bike. I never rode the FS bike on a trail again. I added a 29+ wheel on the fat bike set for summer riding. My back hasn't hurt in years, except when I borrowed a skinny 29er for a long endurance ride thinking it would be better. I barely finished that ride. There are now 6 bikes in my garage and all of them are 3 or more inch tires and not one is FS. My point is your post talked about your comfort, and not the crazy trails a FS bike could handle. If it is about your comfort, bigger tires might be a better choice. Of course if a new FS bike is going to keep you motivated and riding, then that is a better choice. Garage queens are not good for anyone.

    I'd work it down to 3 or so bikes and post in the appropriate forum for the brand. That way you can hear about owners of the specific bikes. If you like your Trek and how it fits you look at their offerings first.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,028
    The Django is a very stiff frame and would be great for a rider your size, but light it is NOT. I have a new django 29er frame, and it's about 3/4 pound heavier than the other frames listed.

    Devinci customer support isn't even close to Ibis or Pivot. Long delays in reply and not that helpful. I think they're more of a marketing group than actual diehard riders like Scot Nicol or Chris Cocalis.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    544
    Yes go 29er for sure! If you like the Trek brand you might like the Top Fuel or Fuel EX depending on much travel you want. I had an issue with the Bontrager dropper and they replaced it no questions asked.

    The Ibis Ripley LS, Devinci Django, Santa Cruz Tallboy, Pivot 429 Trail are all good choices that will give after sale support via the bike shops. You might want to look at Intense with the new consumer direct pricing.

    The Primer is 140/130 or 140/140 and can go into 130/115 mode as well.
    Norco bikes are getting a lot of positive reviews, too.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sml-2727's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,625
    Im actually the same age,weight and height as you, just picked up a Spot Mayhem, it has helped me with climbing a lot and its a good bike decending to.

  7. #7
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9,919
    Quote Originally Posted by Scoutdog44 View Post
    I need some help determining which bikes to consider for a new ride. I currently have a 2017 Trek Procaliber 9.7 but want to move into a full-suspension - I am 6'1", 240lbs, mid-40s and not going to get much faster at this age but I love this sport. I love my current bike but the hard-tail is shaking my teeth out. Cross-country is most of what I ride but due to weight, may need more travel so I am considering Trail bikes too.

    NEEDS: Carbon - want to stay as light as possible, full suspension, cost not really an issue but want to stay less than $10k, efficient climber (I'm old and fat), need as plush ride as possible but not so much that it will not climb or is a constant pogo. Lastly, I have no real allegiance to a mfg or brand but want the after the sale support in the event I have issues.

    WANTS: I would like to stay in a 29" wheel - feels better over mild bumps. I want a more plush ride considering I ride over a fair amount of rock and roots here in the Dallas/Ft Worth area. Want a large sized bike but not unwieldy. Want a cool looking bike but functionality is the key.

    I appreciate your expert help in advance!
    Weight has nothing to do with the amount of travel you need. At all.

    On the same bike, with properly set up suspension, a 140lb rider who hits a rock at the same speed as a 240lb rider will use the exact same proportion of their available travel.

    Fuel EX at 130/130 or Top Fuel with a Fox 34 at 120mm in the front.
    Death from Below.

  8. #8
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,096
    Questions:

    Where/how does one experience this shake your teeth out feeling?

    Does full suspension actually address this feeling?

    I expect full susp to only allow you to be less reliant on suspension through your legs, in order to keep the rear wheel in control. I expect intrinsic material damping, such as polymers in tires, to be the main factor in reducing chatter.

    How about getting CushCore for your rear tire, and a bike fit to give you a bit of comfort? Maybe a skills camp to alter your riding style to be a less passive one where you are allowing the trail to beat you up, and more of an active one where you "attack" the trail?

    I notice that a lot of "slow" people switch to an upright-rearward position (higher bars, shorter stem, saddle moved rearward) and run their saddles on the low side, in an attempt to mimic a cruiser setup and a defensive "anti-OTB" position. I hope this isn't what you've done, in order to seek comfort. It actually does the opposite. You're just making yourself slower and less comfortable, since you're in a less ideal position to go fast, aren't spreading your weight evenly across contact points leading to excessive pressure on your arms/hands and/or seat, and this can actually create more crashes due to lack of momentum and technique.
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ride1424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    86
    Cannondale Scalpel SE.
    Trek Top Fuel
    Both are efficient while pedaling, climb like goats, and wont require a crazy adjustment period coming from a hardtail. Demo, just make sure the shop or a friend helps you properly set up your suspension for your needs and try to ride the bike on your local trail if possible.
    "In dog beers......... I only had one"

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by d365 View Post
    Ibis Ripley LS
    Devinci Django
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
    Pivot 429 Trail
    Thank you for suggestions - I will be sure to check them out!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    15
    I had not even thought about 29+ but will take that into consideration. How much heavier are they over a regular 29er tire?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Ride1424 View Post
    Cannondale Scalpel SE.
    Trek Top Fuel
    Both are efficient while pedaling, climb like goats, and wont require a crazy adjustment period coming from a hardtail. Demo, just make sure the shop or a friend helps you properly set up your suspension for your needs and try to ride the bike on your local trail if possible.
    Thanks for the suggestions!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Weight has nothing to do with the amount of travel you need. At all.

    On the same bike, with properly set up suspension, a 140lb rider who hits a rock at the same speed as a 240lb rider will use the exact same proportion of their available travel.

    Fuel EX at 130/130 or Top Fuel with a Fox 34 at 120mm in the front.
    I will admit that the suspension is probably not calibrated correctly - I need some education in that area for sure.

    I will take a look at those bikes also.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Questions:

    Where/how does one experience this shake your teeth out feeling?

    Does full suspension actually address this feeling?

    I expect full susp to only allow you to be less reliant on suspension through your legs, in order to keep the rear wheel in control. I expect intrinsic material damping, such as polymers in tires, to be the main factor in reducing chatter.

    How about getting CushCore for your rear tire, and a bike fit to give you a bit of comfort? Maybe a skills camp to alter your riding style to be a less passive one where you are allowing the trail to beat you up, and more of an active one where you "attack" the trail?

    I notice that a lot of "slow" people switch to an upright-rearward position (higher bars, shorter stem, saddle moved rearward) and run their saddles on the low side, in an attempt to mimic a cruiser setup and a defensive "anti-OTB" position. I hope this isn't what you've done, in order to seek comfort. It actually does the opposite. You're just making yourself slower and less comfortable, since you're in a less ideal position to go fast, aren't spreading your weight evenly across contact points leading to excessive pressure on your arms/hands and/or seat, and this can actually create more crashes due to lack of momentum and technique.
    You may be right - probably need a professional sizing/fit for the next bike. Lessons are another area I know I could use. Good stuff!

  15. #15
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9,919
    Quote Originally Posted by Scoutdog44 View Post
    I will admit that the suspension is probably not calibrated correctly - I need some education in that area for sure.

    I will take a look at those bikes also.
    Step 1: Buy a shock pump.

    Step 2: Understand how to set sag using air pressure. 20% is a good place to start.

    Step 3: Set sag using air pressure.
    Death from Below.

  16. #16
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,096
    Quote Originally Posted by Scoutdog44 View Post
    You may be right - probably need a professional sizing/fit for the next bike. Lessons are another area I know I could use. Good stuff!
    The first question was rhetoric. If it wasn't clear, fatigue/exhaustion from coping with a bad fitting bike and poor position leads to a passive riding style, one in which you're allowing yourself to get beat up. I just wasn't sure if it was the exact problem you were facing.

    Another problem might be ride duration. I don't recommend forcing yourself to ride for long durations. Perhaps embrace the enjoyability of multiple 45 minute rides?

    Going from a fancy 2017 HT to a new bike... think you've visiting the Kool-Aid machine a bit too often for refills, and are asking around to see if people agree on what your favorite flavor is, which happens to be a fancy high performance 29er trail bike. Now it's like choosing between Pepsi, Coca Cola, Coca Cola Diet/Zero, etc...

    Don't think anyone's gonna argue with a Trek Fuel EX, Scott Spark 900-series, Santa Cruz Tallboy or Hightower, YT Jeffsy, Ibis Ripley LS, or other well-reviewed bikes. Doubt the less promoted bikes like Salsa Spearfish/Horsethief or Niner JET9 would really perform well in a Kool-Aid popularity contest. Just giving you the opportunity to open up to the idea of sticking to your HT, since you said you love it, but that can seem like a lie, considering you're shopping for a new FS bike. If you're keeping it as a 2nd bike, not riding it as often, I'm not sure if that counts as love either. Perhaps you can speak truthfully about it, rather than defending your more recent choice with questionable arguments...

    I could go really deep into the subject of suspension, if you want, sharing explanations with graphs and what not, of what you can expect from a bike without even riding it. Is this what you want? Detailed objective evidence, with technical comparisons? Or do you just want subjective opinions, of people plugging a vote for what they want to see you spend your money on?

    As far as comfort goes, that's super subjective and has to do with more of your mind. What you consider to be well within your comfort zone, what's tolerable, and what's avoided is set by yourself. Not everyone is bothered by small bumps--I actually enjoy hitting them. Modify your perception to expand your comfort zone, so you are okay with things. For example, one can fool themselves into thinking sitting on a handrail or a floor is comfortable enough, but only with certain technique/posture. Once fatigue sets in, they find themselves seeking different positions/posture to rely on other muscles for support, which could be similar to what's going on with your HT. If you put yourself into a position that didn't tire out your muscles as fast, and put you in a position to move more freely, you'd likely stay comfortable longer. For instance, imagine someone sitting with good posture rocking gently on a handrail, versus someone just locking out their limbs remaining stationary on it, which do you expect will feel exhausted and uncomfortable first?
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    The first question was rhetoric. If it wasn't clear, fatigue/exhaustion from coping with a bad fitting bike and poor position leads to a passive riding style, one in which you're allowing yourself to get beat up. I just wasn't sure if it was the exact problem you were facing.

    Another problem might be ride duration. I don't recommend forcing yourself to ride for long durations. Perhaps embrace the enjoyability of multiple 45 minute rides?

    Going from a fancy 2017 HT to a new bike... think you've visiting the Kool-Aid machine a bit too often for refills, and are asking around to see if people agree on what your favorite flavor is, which happens to be a fancy high performance 29er trail bike. Now it's like choosing between Pepsi, Coca Cola, Coca Cola Diet/Zero, etc...

    Don't think anyone's gonna argue with a Trek Fuel EX, Scott Spark 900-series, Santa Cruz Tallboy or Hightower, YT Jeffsy, Ibis Ripley LS, or other well-reviewed bikes. Doubt the less promoted bikes like Salsa Spearfish/Horsethief or Niner JET9 would really perform well in a Kool-Aid popularity contest. Just giving you the opportunity to open up to the idea of sticking to your HT, since you said you love it, but that can seem like a lie, considering you're shopping for a new FS bike. If you're keeping it as a 2nd bike, not riding it as often, I'm not sure if that counts as love either. Perhaps you can speak truthfully about it, rather than defending your more recent choice with questionable arguments...

    I could go really deep into the subject of suspension, if you want, sharing explanations with graphs and what not, of what you can expect from a bike without even riding it. Is this what you want? Detailed objective evidence, with technical comparisons? Or do you just want subjective opinions, of people plugging a vote for what they want to see you spend your money on?

    As far as comfort goes, that's super subjective and has to do with more of your mind. What you consider to be well within your comfort zone, what's tolerable, and what's avoided is set by yourself. Not everyone is bothered by small bumps--I actually enjoy hitting them. Modify your perception to expand your comfort zone, so you are okay with things. For example, one can fool themselves into thinking sitting on a handrail or a floor is comfortable enough, but only with certain technique/posture. Once fatigue sets in, they find themselves seeking different positions/posture to rely on other muscles for support, which could be similar to what's going on with your HT. If you put yourself into a position that didn't tire out your muscles as fast, and put you in a position to move more freely, you'd likely stay comfortable longer. For instance, imagine someone sitting with good posture rocking gently on a handrail, versus someone just locking out their limbs remaining stationary on it, which do you expect will feel exhausted and uncomfortable first?
    Truth be told, I have spinal stenosis which has caused nerve damage in my arms and hands - probably should not be riding like I do but, I do. I had spinal surgery three years ago and now have titanium cages in my neck. The nerve damage has caused weakness and numbness in my hands along with constant pain. This should give you some backstory of why I want to look for a more plush ride. With that said, I do love my current bike (which is a mid-line cross-country bike - not trail) and will continue to ride it in urban environments, parks and on the more smooth trails versus the rocky, root covered trails. A proper bike fitting should probably help here - doubt it would hurt.

    Trust me, I can fully enjoy more than one bike at a time and have been for years. It is similar to having multiple kids - you love them all the same amount but in different ways.

    I checked on the Pivot and Salsa brands today and plan to demo them in the next week or so. I liked both of them "looks" wise but I know I need to get in the saddle to get a real feel. I also took a look at Yeti SB4.5 - any opinions on this bike?

    I plan to look at the recommended Trek's this next weekend and hopefully setup a demo.

    I appreciate all of the feedback!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OXIVE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    12
    consider buy chinese carbon frame and wheelset and build the bike youself?
    OXIVE carbon MTB wheelset2017 lightweight T800 and T700 24 27 30 33 35 40 42 50mm width www.oxivecarbon.com

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    184
    I suggest checking out the Intense Primer as well. I demo'd the SC and Ibis and really liked both bikes, but felt like the Primer was the best climber and my local trails have a lot of climbing. Two months after getting the Primer I took advantage of the free professional bike fit offered by my LBS and I can't believe what a difference it has made. I've had back and shoulder injuries, and frequently get numb hands while riding and back pain. After getting the bike fit and swapping out for different grips, I am less fatigued during rides, climb better, and no longer get numbness.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,840
    Quote Originally Posted by Scoutdog44 View Post
    I also took a look at Yeti SB4.5 - any opinions on this bike?

    I appreciate all of the feedback!
    I rode quite a few short travel 29er trail bikes at Outerbike last year and the SB4.5 was my favorite. Snappy pedaling but still plush over rough terrain.

    Having said that, thereís a bunch of really good 29er Trail bikes available right now. If you can get to a demo event like outerbike and try a bunch of bikes back to back it will really help you decide which is best for YOU.

    Might be late spring before itís available but you should also check out the new Knolly Fugitive.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ladljon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    313
    My friend is a big guy, and rides 29ers. He owned a bike shop for yrs. Has several different bikes. Now he has Pivots and Ellsworth bikes and said the Ellsworth is his fav, go to bike.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-21-2017, 04:47 PM
  2. how many headset spacers is too many?
    By futurerocker1 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: 08-22-2017, 01:33 PM
  3. 700c studded tires, how many studs are too many?
    By Rustedthrough in forum Commuting
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 11-17-2014, 12:33 PM
  4. Too many bikes to choose!
    By MiGSPiNe in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 10-01-2014, 07:10 AM
  5. How many bikes do you really need? This many...
    By signalMTB in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-21-2011, 07:30 PM

Members who have read this thread: 5

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.