Titanium vs Steel- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 39 of 39
  1. #1
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76

    Titanium vs Steel

    Hi Guys!
    Wondering about the opinions/experience with these two materials on ss frames? Why you liked one over the other? Pros/Cons of each. I already have a Niner One 9. Now I want to build one with a ti or steel feel with slider dropouts! Any recommendations!? Thanks!!!

  2. #2
    Harmonius Wrench
    Reputation: Guitar Ted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,254
    Are you a big fella? It may make a difference in "how" you appraoch this question. I am on the big side, and to satisfy me on the titanium side, I would by necessity need a custom rig. That would be very spendy. On the other hand, I have a great, inexpensive frame that I love as a single speed that is simple 4130 CroMo in the OS Bikes Blackbuck. Not sliders, but really, that isn't a big deal to me. The point is, I think if you have "special needs" in the stiffness department, the steel bike is the way to go money-wise. Otherwise, if money is no object, I would have a Lynskey copy of a Ridgeline done in their Level 4 custom tubed build and I know it would be stellar, since the Ridgeline was close, but not quite.

    Trouble is, I could just about buy ten Blackbuck frames for the price of one Level 4 custom Lynskey frame!
    Riden' an Smilin'
    Guitar Ted

    Blog
    RidingGravel.com

  3. #3
    Kosher Princess
    Reputation: Natalie Portman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    747
    I recommend the EROTIC section of Craigslist.

    Beyond that, price might be one of the more significant differences.

    What's 150 roses versus 300 kisses?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Steel for me. Most of the Ti bikes I've ridden are noodley feeling. I'm sure you can get a nice and stiff frame, but I haven't come across one yet. Steel for price, as well.

  5. #5
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by Guitar Ted
    Are you a big fella? It may make a difference in "how" you appraoch this question. I am on the big side, and to satisfy me on the titanium side, I would by necessity need a custom rig. That would be very spendy. On the other hand, I have a great, inexpensive frame that I love as a single speed that is simple 4130 CroMo in the OS Bikes Blackbuck. Not sliders, but really, that isn't a big deal to me. The point is, I think if you have "special needs" in the stiffness department, the steel bike is the way to go money-wise. Otherwise, if money is no object, I would have a Lynskey copy of a Ridgeline done in their Level 4 custom tubed build and I know it would be stellar, since the Ridgeline was close, but not quite.

    Trouble is, I could just about buy ten Blackbuck frames for the price of one Level 4 custom Lynskey frame!
    Ted,
    Thanks for your input! I appreciate it!! I am 155-160 lbs. depending on how much pizza I eat for lunch/dinner! Hmmm since I am on the lighter side do you think a Lynskey Ridgeline SS with slider dropouts be plenty stiff for me? Where can I purchase a Blackbuck frame...their server is off!! Thanks again Ted!!

  6. #6
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by p nut
    Steel for me. Most of the Ti bikes I've ridden are noodley feeling. I'm sure you can get a nice and stiff frame, but I haven't come across one yet. Steel for price, as well.
    p nut,
    I appreciate the feedback! Why is it I always hear that word "noodley" associated with titanium!!?? That scares me to drop a bunch of cash on a frame and just be swaying side to side!! Geeze!! Yeah I like steel a lot too...just wondering if I'm missing anything with the titanium koolaid!!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mdb1974's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    450
    Talked who just "upgraded" to a nice titanium (from steel). He said he was sticking with it because he invested a lot but he said it was pretty flexy, taking some getting used to. At least initially he was not thrilled.

  8. #8
    Stayin' Puft
    Reputation: canyonrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,241
    phatyres, what characteristics are you expecting to "feel" are different in a Ti or Steel bike from your One9? Just curious. Are you looking for a bike that is heavier, or more flexy? Or you could say "compliant" or "forgiving" for a positive spin.

    I liked my One9 pretty well, except for the steep head angle and EBB. The scandium was stellar. Steel is great for forks, and Ti...well, I have too much of a frame-buying habit to spring for Ti on a single frame.

  9. #9
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by mdb1974
    Talked who just "upgraded" to a nice titanium (from steel). He said he was sticking with it because he invested a lot but he said it was pretty flexy, taking some getting used to. At least initially he was not thrilled.
    mdb1974,
    Thanks for the feedback! That is exactly what I'm afraid of!

  10. #10
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,976
    I spent a day on a Mongoose DX (Sandvik Ti) back in 2000 when I was about 185lbs and it felt very noodley. That was on a 26er...I can only assume a 29er with longer stays would exaggerate the issue...as would a SS on climbs. Ti is about 1/2 the stiffness but about 1/2 the weight for the same size and thickness tube as steel. Ti can be made stiffer but would require more material and larger tubes...thus increasing the cost. So you can get a Ti frame to ride stiffer, your wallet is the limit.

  11. #11
    jms
    jms is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,229

    Here's my answer

    Here's my suggestion.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...ht=Tune-a-kish

    I've got over 200 hrs of riding/racing since June on this bike. And FYI the frame is plenty stiff, much more so than the Mamasita it replaced.

  12. #12
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by canyonrat
    phatyres, what characteristics are you expecting to "feel" are different in a Ti or Steel bike from your One9? Just curious. Are you looking for a bike that is heavier, or more flexy? Or you could say "compliant" or "forgiving" for a positive spin.

    I liked my One9 pretty well, except for the steep head angle and EBB. The scandium was stellar. Steel is great for forks, and Ti...well, I have too much of a frame-buying habit to spring for Ti on a single frame.
    Canyonrat,
    Great feedback and great questions!! I love the feel of my One 9. I am having a bit of an issue with the biocentric ebb, but just got it back from the shop doing what Niner says to remedy the slipping issue!!

    As for the feel of ti vs steel...single speeding is already tough enough as is, but fun as hell too!! I want my power being transferred movement forward vs. side to side! I always hear how cool steel feels, but that it is heavy compared to titanium. I've got about $1500-$2000 to spend on a frame. Bottom line is I want a frame that just kicks ass, is reliant, and fun without problems i.e. chain slips!!

  13. #13
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,281
    the ONLY thing better about steel frames are that they have a cuter jingle associated with them, a la "Steel is real" however, that is also a good reason to not like them

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bycyclist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    395
    I upgraded to a custom SS steel frame from a SS titanium frame. Frame costs were comparable - the sale of my ti frame funded the custom steel frame.

    My custom steel frame from Soulcraft fits me exactly and offers a far superior ride than I had experienced with my nice shiny flexy titanium frame.

  15. #15
    Harmonius Wrench
    Reputation: Guitar Ted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,254
    Quote Originally Posted by phatyres
    Ted,
    Thanks for your input! I appreciate it!! I am 155-160 lbs. depending on how much pizza I eat for lunch/dinner! Hmmm since I am on the lighter side do you think a Lynskey Ridgeline SS with slider dropouts be plenty stiff for me? Where can I purchase a Blackbuck frame...their server is off!! Thanks again Ted!!
    A ridgeline would suit your weight well. I loved the way it downhilled due to the titanium flex and climbed due to the lighter weight.

    You could try contacting Mark Slate through his "day job" at WTB for a Blackbuck.
    Riden' an Smilin'
    Guitar Ted

    Blog
    RidingGravel.com

  16. #16
    gumbies need lovin' too
    Reputation: mybrainhurts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie Portman
    I recommend the EROTIC section of Craigslist.

    Beyond that, price might be one of the more significant differences.

    What's 150 roses versus 300 kisses?
    Don't know who you are or if you are a man, woman, shemale or what...but you are the KING/QUEEN of quirkiness. In a very good sort of way.

  17. #17
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by Guitar Ted
    A ridgeline would suit your weight well. I loved the way it downhilled due to the titanium flex and climbed due to the lighter weight.

    You could try contacting Mark Slate through his "day job" at WTB for a Blackbuck.
    Thanks Guitar Ted!! I appreciate your help and feedback!!

  18. #18
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    I spent a day on a Mongoose DX (Sandvik Ti) back in 2000 when I was about 185lbs and it felt very noodley. That was on a 26er...I can only assume a 29er with longer stays would exaggerate the issue...as would a SS on climbs. Ti is about 1/2 the stiffness but about 1/2 the weight for the same size and thickness tube as steel. Ti can be made stiffer but would require more material and larger tubes...thus increasing the cost. So you can get a Ti frame to ride stiffer, your wallet is the limit.
    mtnbike72,
    Thanks for your feedback!

  19. #19
    Stayin' Puft
    Reputation: canyonrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,241
    Quote Originally Posted by phatyres
    Canyonrat,
    Great feedback and great questions!! I love the feel of my One 9. I am having a bit of an issue with the biocentric ebb, but just got it back from the shop doing what Niner says to remedy the slipping issue!!

    As for the feel of ti vs steel...single speeding is already tough enough as is, but fun as hell too!! I want my power being transferred movement forward vs. side to side! I always hear how cool steel feels, but that it is heavy compared to titanium. I've got about $1500-$2000 to spend on a frame. Bottom line is I want a frame that just kicks ass, is reliant, and fun without problems i.e. chain slips!!
    *sigh* that is so disappointing. I really wanted the new Niner EBB to work...the old one was complete trash. I am pretty much convinced sliders are where it's at. I think EBB's work good on tandems...or...somewhere other than mountain bikes.

    So that is a big ol' pile of money...2 or 3 frames worth. Mebbe buy one of these frames:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...t=Rock+Lobster
    And have almost enough left over to buy a sweet wheeset from this dude:
    http://lacemine29.com/

    If I really wanted steel I would just go chat with Walt. I don't think you would be disappointed, I just got one of his forks which is now on my Rock Lobster so I need to update some pics...the fork rocks.
    http://waltworks.com/

  20. #20
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by bycyclist
    I upgraded to a custom SS steel frame from a SS titanium frame. Frame costs were comparable - the sale of my ti frame funded the custom steel frame.

    My custom steel frame from Soulcraft fits me exactly and offers a far superior ride than I had experienced with my nice shiny flexy titanium frame.
    bycyclist,
    Thanks for your input!
    What titanium frame did you have prior?
    How long did you wait for your Soulcraft? (I have highly considered one of these!!)

  21. #21
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by canyonrat
    *sigh* that is so disappointing. I really wanted the new Niner EBB to work...the old one was complete trash. I am pretty much convinced sliders are where it's at. I think EBB's work good on tandems...or...somewhere other than mountain bikes.

    So that is a big ol' pile of money...2 or 3 frames worth. Mebbe buy one of these frames:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...t=Rock+Lobster
    And have almost enough left over to buy a sweet wheeset from this dude:
    http://lacemine29.com/

    If I really wanted steel I would just go chat with Walt. I don't think you would be disappointed, I just got one of his forks which is now on my Rock Lobster so I need to update some pics...the fork rocks.
    http://waltworks.com/
    canyonrat,
    I really want the new Niner ebb to work too...in fact after I post this, I'll go for a ride and let you know if it slips on me....this will be the 4th time I've gone to my lbs to fix this!!

    Wow! Nice links!! I appreciate you sharing!! I'm still in search of the perfect single speed!! Just got a message from a buddy who is going to set me up with an Independent Fabrications frame!! 26" wheels...I need to remedy the 29" project as well...sucks to be me!! Haha!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: paul29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    99
    my own two cents (and as a real novice, it is only worth less) is that the advantage of TI is that it will never rust. As far as the "feel" is concerned, the geometry is 10X more significant than the difference between TI and steel. Of course if a super stiff frame at a reasonable weight and cost is what you are after that problem has already been solved : The answer is aluminum. Id say if you can afford it and especially if you want an unpainted shiny frame that is not rock hard then go with TI. If you want to feel every bump in the road go with aluminum. Otherwise steel is a great material, gives you great spring, is not really heavy, is cheap and easy to work with.

  23. #23
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by paul29er
    my own two cents (and as a real novice, it is only worth less) is that the advantage of TI is that it will never rust. As far as the "feel" is concerned, the geometry is 10X more significant than the difference between TI and steel. Of course if a super stiff frame at a reasonable weight and cost is what you are after that problem has already been solved : The answer is aluminum. Id say if you can afford it and especially if you want an unpainted shiny frame that is not rock hard then go with TI. If you want to feel every bump in the road go with aluminum. Otherwise steel is a great material, gives you great spring, is not really heavy, is cheap and easy to work with.

    paul29er,
    Great points!! I appreciate your input!!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    340
    Ti is a little bit lighter. Figure a bit less than a pound between high-end frames. Ride quality is a wash, IMHO... all depends on tubing diameters and wall thickness. Good designers can make it ride right with either material. Rust is a non-issue. Frame-saver a steel frame, and don't let water sit in the bottom bracket for a long, long time (pull the seatpost and dump water after a long, wet ride, or just drill a hole in the bb shell and you'll likely never have a problem). I like colors and get tired of brushed or polished titanium, but that's just me.

    To illustrate the weight vs. price equation, just look at a couple of high-quality frames made of each. Say, Quiring for titanium and Waltworks for steel. Both good-value, high-quality custom frames. Quiring titanium runs $1950, WW steel runs $1200.

    Weight saved- well, Quiring says his ti frames run 3.4 to 4.0 pounds. Figure maybe 3.6 pounds for a medium/large-sized rider. The same in steel would likely run around 4.4 pounds. So, you're looking at eight tenths of a pound, for $750. That same $750 would buy you a lot of lightweight parts for your bike. Unless you're already in the stratosphere with the level of parts you're dealing with, you'll end up with a lighter bike if you go with steel. A butted titanium frame (I believe the Quiring is straight-gauge) would save a little more weight on the frame, but again, cost quite a bit more.

    I choose the custom frames as an example because I think if you want to spend the money on something nice, custom is a good way to go. I'm much rather have custom steel than non-custom titanium. Of course, build quality and geometry and fit are all much more important than the material used, but keeping those thing constant, I think basically you run into just a weight vs. dollars thing.

  25. #25
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by John_Biker
    Ti is a little bit lighter. Figure a bit less than a pound between high-end frames. Ride quality is a wash, IMHO... all depends on tubing diameters and wall thickness. Good designers can make it ride right with either material. Rust is a non-issue. Frame-saver a steel frame, and don't let water sit in the bottom bracket for a long, long time (pull the seatpost and dump water after a long, wet ride, or just drill a hole in the bb shell and you'll likely never have a problem). I like colors and get tired of brushed or polished titanium, but that's just me.

    To illustrate the weight vs. price equation, just look at a couple of high-quality frames made of each. Say, Quiring for titanium and Waltworks for steel. Both good-value, high-quality custom frames. Quiring titanium runs $1950, WW steel runs $1200.

    Weight saved- well, Quiring says his ti frames run 3.4 to 4.0 pounds. Figure maybe 3.6 pounds for a medium/large-sized rider. The same in steel would likely run around 4.4 pounds. So, you're looking at eight tenths of a pound, for $750. That same $750 would buy you a lot of lightweight parts for your bike. Unless you're already in the stratosphere with the level of parts you're dealing with, you'll end up with a lighter bike if you go with steel. A butted titanium frame (I believe the Quiring is straight-gauge) would save a little more weight on the frame, but again, cost quite a bit more.

    I choose the custom frames as an example because I think if you want to spend the money on something nice, custom is a good way to go. I'm much rather have custom steel than non-custom titanium. Of course, build quality and geometry and fit are all much more important than the material used, but keeping those thing constant, I think basically you run into just a weight vs. dollars thing.

    John_Biker,
    Cool points!! I love your logic about money saved and using that towards lightweight parts!! Thanks for responding!!!

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,599
    Quote Originally Posted by John_Biker
    I choose the custom frames as an example because I think if you want to spend the money on something nice, custom is a good way to go. I'm much rather have custom steel than non-custom titanium.
    Damn you John_Biker, you make too much sense!

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 1-bar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,505
    Quote Originally Posted by John_Biker
    Ti is a little bit lighter. Figure a bit less than a pound between high-end frames. Ride quality is a wash, IMHO... all depends on tubing diameters and wall thickness. Good designers can make it ride right with either material. Rust is a non-issue. Frame-saver a steel frame, and don't let water sit in the bottom bracket for a long, long time (pull the seatpost and dump water after a long, wet ride, or just drill a hole in the bb shell and you'll likely never have a problem). I like colors and get tired of brushed or polished titanium, but that's just me.

    To illustrate the weight vs. price equation, just look at a couple of high-quality frames made of each. Say, Quiring for titanium and Waltworks for steel. Both good-value, high-quality custom frames. Quiring titanium runs $1950, WW steel runs $1200.

    Weight saved- well, Quiring says his ti frames run 3.4 to 4.0 pounds. Figure maybe 3.6 pounds for a medium/large-sized rider. The same in steel would likely run around 4.4 pounds. So, you're looking at eight tenths of a pound, for $750. That same $750 would buy you a lot of lightweight parts for your bike. Unless you're already in the stratosphere with the level of parts you're dealing with, you'll end up with a lighter bike if you go with steel. A butted titanium frame (I believe the Quiring is straight-gauge) would save a little more weight on the frame, but again, cost quite a bit more.

    I choose the custom frames as an example because I think if you want to spend the money on something nice, custom is a good way to go. I'm much rather have custom steel than non-custom titanium. Of course, build quality and geometry and fit are all much more important than the material used, but keeping those thing constant, I think basically you run into just a weight vs. dollars thing.
    Agreed on alot of the points you make. However, iirc my Sir9 was about 4.7lbs with reynolds 853. My current ti frame is a smoother ride and it is 1.2lbs lighter coming in at a frame weight of 3.5lbs and an overall weight of 22.33 lbs. I haven't seen any steel frames fully geared that light. Another thing about ti is it always looks fresh and new, just wipe and go...
    Got LEFTY?
    -2019 C'dale SuperSlateX
    -2017 C’dale Scalpel Carbon 3
    -2014 C’dale Bad Boy 1

  28. #28
    Spear & Magic Helmet
    Reputation: JohnGray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    304

    Reynolds 953 Stainless!

    It's the best of both worlds. You can have all the springy feeling of steel without being burdened by all that rust flaking off as you ride. Since it is stainless you can rock it unpainted - all shiny and new - but without you flopping underneath you like a dying fish. In this way you can show your superiority to both the regular steel crowd (with their lively yet heavy and corroded bikes) and the titanium crowd (with their sparkly yet noodley fish frames). And it is more exclusive than either. Ahh, you would be the envy of all who gaze upon you.

  29. #29
    SS or Die
    Reputation: -Muz R-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    354
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnGray
    It's the best of both worlds. You can have all the springy feeling of steel without being burdened by all that rust flaking off as you ride. Since it is stainless you can rock it unpainted - all shiny and new - but without you flopping underneath you like a dying fish. In this way you can show your superiority to both the regular steel crowd (with their lively yet heavy and corroded bikes) and the titanium crowd (with their sparkly yet noodley fish frames). And it is more exclusive than either. Ahh, you would be the envy of all who gaze upon you.
    I know a guy with a Indy Fab 953 Road bike and from his comments, it would seem 953 is too delicate for Mtbing. He fears that rocks would punch holes through a down tube far easier than 853 or Ti....strange I know but he rides nothing but quality Steel and Ti bikes and distributes a whole host of top end custom bikes here in Oz.
    "Be the Gear..."

  30. #30
    zeebot
    Reputation: Spookykinkajou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,125
    Quote Originally Posted by -Muz R-
    I know a guy with a Indy Fab 953 Road bike and from his comments, it would seem 953 is too delicate for Mtbing. He fears that rocks would punch holes through a down tube far easier than 853 or Ti....strange I know but he rides nothing but quality Steel and Ti bikes and distributes a whole host of top end custom bikes here in Oz.
    I've a friend that has ridden a stainless mtb for years. There must be some other tubes out there. His isn't any lighter than a typical steel frame, just nice and shiny with no paint.

  31. #31
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Don't know if this applies, but I like carbon steel blades better than stainless. Holds their edge better and stronger. Same with guns. Stainless are more prone to cracking and wear.

    Also have not had a steel frame rust on me. But I do live in a very dry climate zone.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azjonboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,682
    I've had 853 steel bikes and currently am on my 2nd custom Ti bike. All 29er hardtails. All SS.
    I loved the way steel rode, even with the small amount of flex. That's part of the beauty of the steel ride. Both of my Ti frames are custom built for my 190# and riding style. I ride lots of rocks and sand and can say without a doubt the Ti rides better and handles better. Too flexy? This frame is stiffer than any steel frame I've ridden and doesn't beat me up after 4 hours in the saddle. Efficient power transfer? Yes.

    Either go with a good steel builder or a good custom Ti builder. A good builder chooses the tubing to fit your weight and riding style.

    As for 953 tubing, it's harder to work with than Ti and more expensive as well.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  33. #33
    Ride Fast & Have Fun!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by azjonboy
    I've had 853 steel bikes and currently am on my 2nd custom Ti bike. All 29er hardtails. All SS.
    I loved the way steel rode, even with the small amount of flex. That's part of the beauty of the steel ride. Both of my Ti frames are custom built for my 190# and riding style. I ride lots of rocks and sand and can say without a doubt the Ti rides better and handles better. Too flexy? This frame is stiffer than any steel frame I've ridden and doesn't beat me up after 4 hours in the saddle. Efficient power transfer? Yes.

    Either go with a good steel builder or a good custom Ti builder. A good builder chooses the tubing to fit your weight and riding style.

    As for 953 tubing, it's harder to work with than Ti and more expensive as well.
    azjonboy,
    Thanks for your reply!! Great feedback!! I appreciate it!!

  34. #34
    Waiting for Godot
    Reputation: OilcanRacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,054
    Quote Originally Posted by 1-bar
    My current ti frame is a smoother ride and it is 1.2lbs lighter coming in at a frame weight of 3.5lbs and an overall weight of 22.33 lbs. I haven't seen any steel frames fully geared that light.

    really? my vassago comes in at 18lbs with carbon forks in race trim and just over 20lbs with a carbon lefty in training parts. steel frame is 4.4lbs the flex is perfect in all the right places, but the fit is what sold me on this bike. the one in front there.








    this is my new "access" converted SS. aluminum frame at 3.3lbs. the top tube is a little shorter than the vassago, but the frame tubes are so thin it actually has good bumpy trail flex like the vassago. it was cheap and i threw on parts i had laying around, some good some medium.







    .
    Out riding, leave a message

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    208

    So...

    So I had a custom Ti bike made three years ago, I like it, don't get me wrong, but it was the most expensive thing I have ever bought, it isn't exactly what I want, it is flexy, yet also very damp. I also broke the frame twice, so my opinion, stay with steel, it is heavier, but it is cheaper, stiffer and cheep and easy to replace, save on the frame, buy nice wheels!!!

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: poff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,067
    Arguing for/against something because of the "fit" is cheap. Any reputable builder will custom fit you. It all comes down to preferences, I like how ti rides, my moots is super stiff, fits me perfectly, rides awesome (IMHO), and looks great. It costs $$$, but I can afford it. My only experience with steel was Spot SS, it was nice, but I prefer my current ride. On the other hand, I love to ride pegs (Pegoretties for those in the dark), these steel beasts cost more than ti and carbon. Just my 2c.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ak greeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    483

    ti, ti, ti, ti, ti, ti, ti, ti, ti, ti, ti, ti

    at 165lbs, i dont think you'll have any flexing issues with a lynskey ridgeline. you get lots of bang for the buck with this frame. imho. it's forgiving over the bumps, accelerates beautifully, and should last a life time. of course I'm biased.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  38. #38
    Recovering Weight Weenie
    Reputation: Padre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,814
    I'm a big guy having had custom ti and steel built.

    I prefer ti.

    Both are good. Ti is lighter and can ride like steel.

  39. #39

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1
    I'm not much of a frame geek but I rode (still ride on occasion) a 4130 double butted steel framed MTB for 12 years before I traded up to a non butted Ti 29er frame. I not sure were the flexy stigma of Ti comes from, cause side by sides rides tell me that my steel frame is a less stiff and flexes more than the Ti frame.

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.