Tell me what you like about rigid forks- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Tell me what you like about rigid forks

    I'm Toying with the idea of trying a rigid carbon fork on my spot single speed. I'd hate to buy one and find out it sucks to ride full rigid. I dont have one to try out, but I am looking.
    There are some smooth trails here, but most are rocky and somewhat steep. lots of climbing, lots of decending.
    Thanks for your oppinions.

  2. #2
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    Why are you thinking about going rigid? Why do you think it might be worth it? Your best bet is finding a rigid somewhere and riding it. I dont like rigid's but some people love them.

  3. #3
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    I would definitely recommend the Niner Carbon fork. I was skeptical about changing over to the Niner from my Fox but decided to do it anyway. I don't think I would ever go back.

  4. #4
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    Steering precision, low maintenance, flickability. I find it easier and quicker to move the front wheel around. It beats the living crap out of you on rocky trails, but I prefer it. In comparison, I would say I can ride @30% farther on a suspension fork on rocky trails before my arms start to get fatigued.

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  5. #5
    SyT
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    just grab a steely for the experience, not enough difference in the ride between the two to justify the addtional expense for the experiment.

  6. #6
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    I think there's lots of threads on why people ride rigid. It's generally just an issue of preference, touching on riding style and occasionally a disdain for fork and suspension-related maintenance. For what it's worth, I ride rigid on steep rocky terrain in Colorado. However, I imagine that your first rides on a rigid bike may well "suck" because, without realizing it, you have likely come to rely on your suspension fork. When you ride on a rigid fork and frame, you have to compensate for all the little movements and adjustments your suspension has been doing.
    "Fact is only what you believe; fact and fiction work as a team." Jack Johnson

  7. #7
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    I like how good it feels when I stop.

    Seriously, my first 6 months on 29er were rigid and it was fine - nice steering precision and I could ride just about anything I did on my 26 inch full squish. The problem came when I tried to race, especially wet courses. Kept bouncing off everything. So I put on a Reba with lockout and it's been much better for that stuff. If I had infinite bikes I'd keep one rigid for recreation but not yet.

    Jamis exile 29er 1x9 by the way. If you can score a used exile fork you should be pretty happy (no, not selling mine )

  8. #8
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    I wanted a suspension fork on my singlespeed for the first year I owned it. I didn't buy one because of the cost of a decent suspension fork.

    Two years later, I wouldn't put one on that bike if it was free.

    Point is, it takes some time for a rigid fork to grow on ya after you've been riding suspension.

    I will always have suspesion on my race bikes though. Simply faster over the long haul.

  9. #9
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    they're lighter, and they steer easier/more precisely.
    that's it.
    with the right tires you can start to forget about suspension (on SOME trails, NOT all).
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  10. #10
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hblAppO67Ig

    it's light and simple and in most cases after a while you wont miss suspension

  11. #11
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    i ride everything there is to ride in AZ on a rigid bike, just a plain chromo salsa fork. What is the difference to me? No maintenance and different riding experience.

    it is always worth trying something different. You might like it you might not but at least you will know.
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  12. #12
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    I would reccomend against trying one. It takes a little getting used to and you might not like it before you notice the benefits. Make the commitment and jump.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjmtb1
    I would reccomend against trying one. It takes a little getting used to and you might not like it before you notice the benefits. Make the commitment and jump.
    I agree 100%

  14. #14
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    I bought a cheap rigid a few months ago, first ride, loved it on lesser stuff, very fast in the right situations compared to my FS, shoots up hills strangely impressively.

    Don't know about rocky trails though, only use for forest tracks at the most without any kind of drops really, 29" wheel with a Ardent 2.4 running low ish pressure handles rocks and roots without me missing the FS to much.

    Different kind of riding, you likely won't keep up with your mates down stuff but you'll likely have more fun riding down and it'll take longer so more bang for your buck.

    My other tip is, run the bars HIGH up keep the weight off your arms you need to be able to ride with your elbows bent to take the hits ALL THE TIME, drop down a kerb with straight elbows and PAIN.

    So keep your elbows bent without you've got Zero suspension.

    Ordered a Azonic Double Walled Bar to hopefully improve the comfort slightly more to it all helps.

  15. #15
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    I am liking my rigid Soul Cycles on all the trails I have tried so far (Had a Mary SS for a while too). It is tougher to ride tech stuff on and you probably won't feel like you have gained any advantage by using one. For smooth trails you will fly though - I think just as much as a hardtail with a fork.

    I have two other bikes that are FS but I ride this one the most because it is a pure joy to grab a bike for a ride that you don't have to fuss with at all!
    "You can't discern by calculating in your mind how it will work. You have to feel how it rides differently to understand."

  16. #16
    REALLY?
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    Why do I like ridged, because imho steel frames have a ride quality far superior to any other frame material I've ridden, so I like ridged forks because I like to feel the steel.
    DJ, "Because I'm sure the world need's more dudes stalking the woods stoned out of their mind carrying a deadly weapon."

  17. #17
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    What nobody has mentioned is that you can really feel the texture of the terrain you're riding on.

    My first mountain bike was a full-rigid, and ever since switched to suspension I always missed that feeling of being truly connected to the trail.

  18. #18
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    Just buy a steel one so you can use it as a back up in case you don't like the rigid. It's great on smooth trails but not the bumpy ones obviously. I prefer front suspension for the trails I ride the most which are not overly bumpy but have roots. I tried a full rigid while riding with a slow friend and liked it, but the next day I rode alone and rode much faster and didn't appreciate the rigid so much. it will beat you up on the bumpy stuff at speed.
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  19. #19
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    Eh for $200 if you like or don't that is no biggie, especially when you consider the resale value on most of these carbon forks. I had a Reba SL and switched to a Nuke Proof carbon fork. I ABSOLUTELY love it over the Reba. The handling is so crisp now and man, out of the saddle hammer time has extreme rewards. Plus there is a good weight drop too. My bike now weighs 20.5lbs full geared and rigid. I also have a pretty light Titus RX 29er but that has seen very little action since I went full rigid. If there is a downside, it is well rigid. Downhill bombing in rock gardens are not pleasant at all. Luckily for me most of my trails are fairly smooth.

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  20. #20
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    All my bikes except for my FS 26" are rigid. I live in an area that's steep and rocky, but I guess it's an old preference due to my roots in BMX.

    My FS is fun, but it's heavy and a sloooow climber. I'd rather deal with the bumps than bouncing around when mashing climbs, even with lock out.

  21. #21
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    everything?

  22. #22
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Point One for Rigid Forks: You pick a line, and quickly. Suspension lets you get away with poor choices, while rigid trains you to read lines quickly. Throw on the suspension fork, you are automaticlly fast, as mistakes don't cause a crisis.

    Point Two for Rigid Forks: Rolling hills- advantage rigid. There are trials that don't have big hits and you can crush the minor advantage of suspension downhill in the climbs. During the summer I am trending towards suspension. In the winter....

  23. #23
    Bike Geek
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    No leaks to worry about.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjmtb1
    I would reccomend against trying one. It takes a little getting used to and you might not like it before you notice the benefits. Make the commitment and jump.
    True Dat. one bad ride could cloud your judgment. you will need time

    something not said here yet: don't underestimate the value you have come to depend on front Suspension while climbing

    I like Rigid now for all the reasons stated. But when I miss suspension it is less for descending and more for slow technical climbing (weight and squish aside) There are times when I want the momentum back Lost when your front wheel gets stalled on some staircase type or rocky root type sections when you are maxed out and just cant find it in you to to lighten the front with your heart rate through the roof...especially out of the saddle. Where a sup fork will take the edge off a little and allow the wheel to roll, sometimes a rigid stalls you out. It is easy to chalk that up to rider error but some of you know what I mean when you are pinned in the red on a SS especially

    The benefits (as described by many here) now for my riding style now outweigh the negatives. But if you go out once and stall on a climb or your arms ache after one ride you might not go there at all and have enough time to discover the benefits to you.

    Some of us never had the option way back when we started riding mountain bikes...

    If you are mechanically inclined it is quite easy and inexpensive to swap out forks IMHO.
    Why are there so many threads about cheap ass bikes?

  25. #25
    cvs
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    When riding a mt bike hitting the trail we should all like the bumps, the curves, the lines ohhhh the lines. No better way then to drop a long sexy ridged 29er fork onto the front-end to accentuate the feeling of being connected to the trail. You may take some beatings but its well worth ride.

    the ridged fork forces you to find the best lines through terrain, up hill and down. mentally i believe you become a stronger xc rider. you become 90% percent of the suspension learning to stay on that bike in most messed up of situations. Beefing those forearms up getting stronger then what you would with some suspension.

    technically though the new forks with superb lock out and how light weight there becoming they are far superior in almost every condition for just pure raging but can cost 700 bucks.

  26. #26
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    It's not only about picking lines, but you also kind of learn how to trials ride a bit. When I was 15, we used to go up stairs sideways (parallel) but lifting the rear wheel, kicking it over, then hoisting the front wheel. If we felt like tipping, we'd hop a little to get back in line. I truly believe that all that urban BMX riding has paid off big time.

    Sometimes, I find myself doing this same type of riding when climbing rocks, by modulating the front and rear brakes to place a wheel in certain places. With the full suspension you have the luxury of just running sh*t over. Trials type riding may be a bit slower than the ability to "monster truck" over everything, but I actually like it better.

  27. #27
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    Because its a challenge.Grit yer teeth and plow through.You will learn how to really ride a bike and its like riding a big bmx,fun.

  28. #28
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    Rigid Steel:
    Pros: Simple (i.e. no maintenance), cheapest, direct steering, robust
    Cons: Best for smooth trails, arms will ache on long rides

    Rigid Carbon:
    Pros: Simple (i.e. no maintenance), cheaper than suss, direct steering, lightest
    Cons: Best for smooth trails, arms will ache on long rides (Some people claim some level of compliance for carbon over steel but I haven't really noticed it to any great degree.)

    Suss:
    Pros: Comfort on rough or long rides, faster on rough descents, more forgiving of line
    Cons: Most expensive, bob when climbing out of the saddle (even with lockout) for this reason I would never use a suss fork on a SS.

    To sum up I would say if you were going for rigid forks then the only reasons to go for carbon over steel would be weight considerations or you just fancied the bling.
    Suss forks are definitely more comfortable in the long run but it depends what type of terrain you mainly ride, how long you ride for and how much pain can you stand! )

    Also, large tyres at low pressures will give some measure of cushioning with rigid forks but will obviously negate the weight advantages to some extent.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ike Turner
    True Dat. one bad ride could cloud your judgment. you will need time

    something not said here yet: don't underestimate the value you have come to depend on front Suspension while climbing

    I like Rigid now for all the reasons stated. But when I miss suspension it is less for descending and more for slow technical climbing (weight and squish aside) There are times when I want the momentum back Lost when your front wheel gets stalled on some staircase type or rocky root type sections when you are maxed out and just cant find it in you to to lighten the front with your heart rate through the roof...especially out of the saddle. Where a sup fork will take the edge off a little and allow the wheel to roll, sometimes a rigid stalls you out. It is easy to chalk that up to rider error but some of you know what I mean when you are pinned in the red on a SS especially

    The benefits (as described by many here) now for my riding style now outweigh the negatives. But if you go out once and stall on a climb or your arms ache after one ride you might not go there at all and have enough time to discover the benefits to you.

    Some of us never had the option way back when we started riding mountain bikes...

    If you are mechanically inclined it is quite easy and inexpensive to swap out forks IMHO.
    Exactly my thoughts too.....great dirt yesterday, but I had a few more than normal stalls on the uphill side of a few rooty sections when the legs couldn't generate the same torque that higher gearing produces. Sections I routinely powered through on my Sultan.....time to hit the gym and build more torque.

    I hit 30mph coming down Lair of the Bear on a rigid SS . The ascent was rough on the lungs/legs (being a Florida-lunged rider).
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  30. #30
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    Bikes are so expensive in general now. I would say that riding rigid is a big f you to the industry for charging so much for the products they sell but:

    a) I don't really think that or believe in it strongly enough to influence what type of bike I ride (suspension or non suspension. People pay just as much for high end shotguns as we do for nice bikes. b) Some of the most expensive bikes posted on here are swanky hand made bikes with rigid forks.
    "You can't discern by calculating in your mind how it will work. You have to feel how it rides differently to understand."

  31. #31
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    Yeah riding rigid most of the time if I'm on my own saves the FS which is expensive in well everything for best.

    I'm quicker on the FS in general except maybe climbing so need that for group rides and rougher areas I ride.

    Also Rigid concentration needs to be kept at all times, FS brain off ohhh I've done 30miles.

  32. #32
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    Took the rigid out tonight, not a issue at all for 98% of the ride, a few swooping descents which where nice, but there is 1 big descent I do around here, on the FS it feels pretty smooth on the rigid at night I was getting chopped around like crazy it's hard to take a impact front and rear same time pretty much it gets all confusing and that was picking the easier lines.

    Wouldn't want to be without my FS, could survive with a HT if needs be though.

  33. #33
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    I ride rigid for my seasonal dose of ulnar nerve damage. Once attained I normally switch back to a front shock.

  34. #34
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    In addition to repeating what everyone else said about them....which i agree with. I like riding them because when I ride my front suspension bike, and just float over a rocky section, I like saying to myself with that big grin- rather than grit- "Nice to have a suspension fork once in a while....that was SMOOTH!" Suspension forks have their time and place....

  35. #35
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    My rigid bike is a 26er. I realised very quickly that I cannot ride it like a HT: my wrists would never survive it.

    There's the thing about picking lines but, also, I had to make a big adjustment to my balance on the bike. It is more like my legs are the front suspension too and the hands are for fine tuning what exactly I want the front of the bike to do.

  36. #36
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    Another one here with a rigid 26er. I went to a rigid when I refurbished my old bike because I couldn't afford a nice squish up front, and I though anything would be better than the P.O.S. 1st gen Judy TT pogo stick that came with the bike. The rigid fork lightened up the bike considerably. Like everyone says, it makes you pick your lines and learn better balance/control. I generally like it--esp climbing. However, going over rocky areas are a pain, as is doing any downhill with lots of roots. I don't mind the extra challenge (in fact I like it) when I am riding alone, but when I ride with friends, its hard to keep up and frustrating to watch everyone bomb down a trail while I am hopping, junkin, and jukin. I also agree 100% with the comment about concentration. If you lose focus, you will take a beating. The joints do get sore on longer rides.

    I am going to be getting a rigid 29er soon, so I will be interested to see how a rigid fork works in that application.

  37. #37
    Rigid in Evergreen
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    Riding rigid is like having unprotected sex. It feels awesome, but you have to be far more careful where you stick your... ahhh... front wheel?

  38. #38
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    I made the jump this year as well to rigid. For racing it is great 95% of the time. It feels faster everywhere except for the real rocky, rooty stuff but compensates with better hammering. Most of the techy stuff here is not that long (less than 200 metres) so the rigid is not really a disadvantage. Best thing to do is switch back and forth for the conditions. Most headset manufacturers offer the option to get another crown race so the swap is less than 10 minutes. I went with the Niner Carbon. It rocks. But don't sell you suspension fork!!! My favorite place to ride where I live is way to hard on the hands to ride rigid.

  39. #39
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    ringwood NJ?

  40. #40
    the test dummy
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    i got a fully then went back to the rigid and realized how much i hate and don't need suspension, so i say do it.
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  41. #41
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    Same reasons already mentioned - NO maintenance, tracks better, lighter, cheaper.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by b2b2
    I'd hate to buy one and find out it sucks to ride full rigid.
    I did. And it does. Wanna go slower on those rocky trails ? Get a rigid fork.

    (YMMV depending on where you ride, the size of your e-nuts, the superior suppleness of your rad reynolds 853 custom dream ride, you're a cyclocrosser at heart, or if you're just fat and slow already)

  43. #43
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    ride it enough and you'll find that your joints get stronger and you won't notice it as much. Did a season of endurance racing on my rigid single speed buy the end of the summer I was fine.

  44. #44
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    It's all been said above, but remember that without your arms bent you have no front suspension - so you may want a shorter stem or something so that you're not pitched out front too easily. Getting your weight distribution correct (whatever that is) seems to matter more on a rigid as well, since you can't just pump up your shock or let some air out or adjust the damping, etc....

    And really, I think if you have any suspension on a bike, if it's not set up correctly, a guy (or girl) on a rigid is likely to pass you anyway, whether you're going up or down.

    So try it. Give it a good 6 months at least while you find the right position on the bike, learn to ride clean lines, and learn not to panic when you blunder into a rock garden at 30mph.

    -F

  45. #45
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    I've never been so enthusiastic about riding as when I had a rigid set-up. I ended up getting a susp fork that I rode for the last couple years, but am about to back to a steel fork (and am totally looking forward to it). It's just fun. Standing climbs are a hoot.

  46. #46
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    What nobody has mentioned is that you can really feel the texture of the terrain you're riding on.
    WORD!

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by 55rpmasher
    I made the jump this year as well to rigid. For racing it is great 95% of the time. It feels faster everywhere except for the real rocky, rooty stuff but compensates with better hammering. Most of the techy stuff here is not that long (less than 200 metres) so the rigid is not really a disadvantage. Best thing to do is switch back and forth for the conditions. Most headset manufacturers offer the option to get another crown race so the swap is less than 10 minutes. I went with the Niner Carbon. It rocks. But don't sell you suspension fork!!! My favorite place to ride where I live is way to hard on the hands to ride rigid.
    feeling faster and being faster are 2 totally different things.

  48. #48
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    Not mentioned yet?

    Quote Originally Posted by b2b2
    I'd hate...find out it sucks to ride full rigid. I dont have one to try out, but I am looking.
    Do you have a lockout? If so, you have a rigid fork. Ride it locked out with yer arms and knees bent. If you like it and want to save some weight after doing so, buy a rigid fork. If you don't care about the weight, just leave your fork locked out.

    Go get 'em, Tiger.

  49. #49
    Its got what plants crave
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    Nothing, I don't ride one.



    I'd consider it, but I think I'd put some fat tires on whatever rigid I bought to spare my body the battering.
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  50. #50
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    Should have those Double Walled Azonic bars here tomorrow we'll see if that actually helps or not and shall report back.

  51. #51
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    Tell me what you like about rigid forks

    Not much...

    I had one installed on my Dos while looking for a used Reba. As soon as I found one, the rigid was in the mail to its new owner.

    I have a lockout so I can hammer up hills when needed, but I rarely even use that...
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  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by 105millimetersofpleasure
    Do you have a lockout? If so, you have a rigid fork. Ride it locked out with yer arms and knees bent. If you like it and want to save some weight after doing so, buy a rigid fork. If you don't care about the weight, just leave your fork locked out.

    Go get 'em, Tiger.

    If you did ride a locked out fork and hit it really hard, would it mess up the internals?

    It seems like so much impact is dissipated through the suspension that locking it out could damage it if you forgot to unlock it and then blundered into some trouble. I really don't know (coming from someone who dinged, dented, pinch-flatted, cracked a hub, and broke an axle on his rigids over the years).

    -F

  53. #53
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    Well, well, well. Lookie here. Just stumbled across this thread and it hit home. I got my first Mtn bike back in the early 90's and it was a Specialized Stumpjumper with a Rock Shox JudyXC front fork, in essence, until now, I've always ridden with suspension. Graduated to a Fat Chance "Yo Eddy" and all my friends tried to talk me into the big 1 inch fork but I went soft. Added front suspension and raced it for 10 years before going full squishy. Been racing full squishy up until 4 weeks ago when for some off the wall reason, I decided to build up a lightweight Ti frame fully rigid bike and learn how to mtn bike with no squish. Just under 200 miles later I can tell you that this has been a great (but hard) experience. I agree with other posters about having to develop a better riding style, just as I had to do from a hardtail to a FS bike. What I've learned is to become more of a finesse rider and learning to read the terrain better in order to be more fluid and smooth on the trail and have less fatigue. I've slowly progressed to get to my previous best times on my local course on my FS bike on the fully rigid. This came from being thrown off at high speed in the turns, wheels washing out because of bad air pressure etc. The big difference is to see how I hold up in the endurance races of 6-12 hrs with no suspension. I have noticed how much more critical tire choice and air pressure becomes on a fully rigid. There was a guy in the early 90's that decimated all the locals on his fully rigid bike. To each their own.

    Oh yeah, what I like is the light weight, agility, superclimbability and old schoolness of the rigid.
    Last edited by Shakenbake; 08-23-2010 at 09:08 PM.
    Shakenbake

  54. #54
    Rigid in Evergreen
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas
    If you did ride a locked out fork and hit it really hard, would it mess up the internals?

    -F
    Typically the fork should have a blow-off valve... at least my Fox RLC does.

  55. #55
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    One less thing to set, tweak, or break frees up my mind to think about important things like turning the cranks.
    My other bike is a /7.

  56. #56
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    Well, it provides an essential part of my bike at a low cost. Which is currently all I need.
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  57. #57
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    If your a rigid rider and want a bit of extra comfort then I can recommend these bars.

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...x?ModelID=7030

    Or any of the Double Wall bars, compared to the cheap bars which came off the rigid and didn't move at all, these are getting likely 5mm's just pushing down hard ish, it looks too much and scarey so we'll see how long they stick upto rigid abuse.

    Noticeable more comfortable up and down kerbs which is as far as I've got, £25 well spent

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by b2b2
    I'm Toying with the idea of trying a rigid carbon fork on my spot single speed. I'd hate to buy one and find out it sucks to ride full rigid. I dont have one to try out, but I am looking. There are some smooth trails here, but most are rocky and somewhat steep. lots of climbing, lots of decending. Thanks for your oppinions.
    It is just another way to enjoy a bike.

    I ride rigid, FS, Hardtails, all on pretty much the same terrain, and rigid is a hoot, but it does give a beating. For some reason I get a better buzz after a rigid ride as well. I think it has to do somewhat with the beating received.

    Rigid does not limit you to any particular type of riding, but I typically ride the rough downhills slower and avoid any drops more than about 2 feet.

    Try it and enjoy:









    <iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/14402175?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;c olor=ff9933" width="600" height="450" frameborder="0"></iframe>

    <iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/14304032?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;c olor=ff9933" width="600" height="450" frameborder="0"></iframe>
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  59. #59
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    I did a 30mile on the rigid loved it, scared me to death on 1 descent, but I tried to ride 2 days later and my arms hurt and it's just painful, it's something you can't do often, not when your nearing 40.

    I do think I'm adapting to it though it's not as painful as it used to be.

    Think of it as a upper body work out aswell.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd
    I did a 30mile on the rigid loved it, scared me to death on 1 descent, but I tried to ride 2 days later and my arms hurt and it's just painful, it's something I can't do often, not when I'm nearing 40.

    I do think I'm adapting to it though it's not as painful as it used to be.

    Think of it as a upper body work out as well.
    Fixed it for you

    I'm nearing 40 and can do it.
    <object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/_rAHnwWfsaY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/_rAHnwWfsaY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd
    I did a 30mile on the rigid loved it, scared me to death on 1 descent, but I tried to ride 2 days later and my arms hurt and it's just painful, it's something you can't do often, not when your nearing 40.

    I do think I'm adapting to it though it's not as painful as it used to be.

    Think of it as a upper body work out aswell.
    I am definitely flirting with 40 and have been riding a rigid bike exclusively for about 4 years now and prior to that I was riding my 26er singlespeed rigid for about 4 years.

    The most important factor for me, besides the bigger wheels was an alt bar. I put an On-one mary on there and can ride for hours of the most technical terrain as AZ can offer. The only physical regrets I get is if I forget to take off my wedding ring prior to riding or if I get some cactus in my hands then have to continue to ride for a couple of hours.

    I definitely suggest checking out the high backsweep bars if you are on the fence about trying or keeping your bike rigid.
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  62. #62
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    May have to look into a Mary bars, just fitted Azonic Double Wall bars which have some serious flex and a tiny bit of back sweep, I'm talking 5mm's just pushing the bars down hard ish ( bust thumb can't push to hard ), so might get 10mm's of extra travel on the trail on bigger hits.

    Will the take 220lb's + kit + rigid for long ??? fitted some to the FS to, anything to cut down on hand numbness.

  63. #63
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    i love how everyone on here keeps saying "bend your arms, get a shorter stem, run your bars higher, pick your lines better, go slower over the rocky stuff, give it 6 months...etc"
    eff that.
    ran rigid for 8 months and finally came to the realization that suspension was invented for a reason.
    why take a step backwards?

  64. #64
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    Well... sorta...

    Quote Originally Posted by 105millimetersofpleasure
    Do you have a lockout? If so, you have a rigid fork. Ride it locked out with yer arms and knees bent. If you like it and want to save some weight after doing so, buy a rigid fork. If you don't care about the weight, just leave your fork locked out.

    Go get 'em, Tiger.
    There is still the flexy issue. My Reba 29er (older version) is still a noodle, even locked out. The front wheel is allowed to twist. I do like the way the Reba can be set to break away when locked out with the Motion Control setting.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny the boy
    i love how everyone on here keeps saying "bend your arms, get a shorter stem, run your bars higher, pick your lines better, go slower over the rocky stuff, give it 6 months...etc"
    eff that.
    ran rigid for 8 months and finally came to the realization that suspension was invented for a reason.
    why take a step backwards?

    You need a FS aswell I only use the Rigid for lesser stuff when I haven't got the time to get to better stuff, it makes the lesser stuff harder and therefore more fun, it also means I can put night time fat burning 30mile canal runs in without wearing out the costly FSer.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny the boy
    i love how everyone on here keeps saying "bend your arms, get a shorter stem, run your bars higher, pick your lines better, go slower over the rocky stuff, give it 6 months...etc"
    eff that.
    ran rigid for 8 months and finally came to the realization that suspension was invented for a reason.
    why take a step backwards?
    why take a step "forwards"?

    'cause it is what you want to do. Some people don't want to ride suspension for whatever their reasons just like some people don't want to ride rigid for whatever their reasons. The only inane thing is judging someone by their choice. Riding is riding.
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  67. #67
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    Rigid is great for mountain bikes unless you ride actual mountain bike trails.
    I just returned from eight days of riding in Switzerland where we did 75,000 feet of descending in total and as much as 14,000 in one day. Our group had 5"-6"-travel trail bikes. I'd rather have gotten shot in the face than ridden a rigid bike for those eight days. Where's the fun in having less control, poorer braking, less traction and lower speed? Someone, enlighten me!
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  68. #68
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    I like grabbing big air

    <link rel="File-List" href="file://localhost/Users/gilbertoviedo/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/msoclip/0/clip_filelist.xml"> <style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Cambria; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-fareast-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style> <!--StartFragment-->
    I like grabbing big air and suspension allows me to ride faster and jump higher without feeling the true impact.

    Better yet… if you ride for technique and can afford both a suspension bike and a rigid single speed… then hell yeah!
    <!--EndFragment-->
    Ride on!

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  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by barticus
    Someone, enlighten me!
    Elementary, my dear Watson.

    With a rigid bike, or HT, I don't have to go to Switzerland for a ride to feel like something. I can get a challenge out of the local trails in an hour or five, after work or during the weekend.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by barticus
    Rigid is great for mountain bikes unless you ride actual mountain bike trails.
    I just returned from eight days of riding in Switzerland where we did 75,000 feet of descending in total and as much as 14,000 in one day. Our group had 5"-6"-travel trail bikes. I'd rather have gotten shot in the face than ridden a rigid bike for those eight days. Where's the fun in having less control, poorer braking, less traction and lower speed? Someone, enlighten me!

    that sounds boring, expensive and lame. Why not just drive ride down in a car?

    sucks when someone judges what you enjoy and how you choose to enjoy it. Where doesn anyone get off judging what I determine is fun? if you don't like it don't do it. I don't like spending the little free time i have maintaining pivots, making sure my air pressure is set right, heck even adjusting my gears so I ride a rigid singlespeed mountain bike. I maximize my free time with riding. YMMV.
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  71. #71
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    [QUOTE=rockcrusher]that sounds boring, expensive and lame. Why not just drive ride down in a car?

    Yes, traveling the world is boring and lame. I should ignore my opportunities for adventure and stay home. Thanks for enlightenment and for taking the high road by not judging what I like to do. (I guess I could have driven down all that sweet singletrack in a car. That would have been MUCH more challenging than even a rigid bike.)
    You're right, I was judgemental of rigid bikes in my previous post. That's why I asked for someone to explain to me "where's the fun".
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  72. #72
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    I sometimes use a Gazzallodi 3 inch tyre at about 15psi with the rigid fork.Fun,fun.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by barticus
    Rigid is great for mountain bikes unless you ride actual mountain bike trails.
    I just returned from eight days of riding in Switzerland where we did 75,000 feet of descending in total and as much as 14,000 in one day. Our group had 5"-6"-travel trail bikes. I'd rather have gotten shot in the face than ridden a rigid bike for those eight days. Where's the fun in having less control, poorer braking, less traction and lower speed? Someone, enlighten me!
    The old-schooler in me says "real" MTBing pretty much comes out to

    descending time x 3 = climbing time

    If you pedaled to the top, But it would have been easier on a rigid bike.

    If you drove or flew to the top, then I hope you went hardcore and removed your chain for the trip down, because a La-Z-Boy doesn't need one. But as long as you were having fun, that's all that matters.

    -F

    PS - and to the naysayers: it IS possible to ride rigid at 40 y.o. (or 70), it IS possible to ride rigid for 20 yrs. (or more) and not have your shoulder joints fall apart, and it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun than you're having on whatever bike they might happen to be riding when you see them or even if you don't, and especially if they don't post about it on the internet 'cause they're out riding.

    edit: added "real"
    Last edited by Fleas; 08-30-2010 at 06:40 AM.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas
    it IS possible to ride rigid at 40 y.o. (or 70), it IS possible to ride rigid for 20 yrs. (or more) and not have your shoulder joints fall apart, and it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun than you're having on whatever bike they might happen to be riding when you see them or even if you don't, and especially if they don't post about it on the internet 'cause they're out riding.
    That was a bit long. Otherwise I'd make it the first signature I've ever had on a forum

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher
    I don't like spending the little free time i have maintaining pivots, making sure my air pressure is set right, heck even adjusting my gears so I ride a rigid singlespeed mountain bike.
    I actually enjoy that part of it. If the weather or trails are bad, I can think of no better alternative than to take a day and maintain / adjust my bikes while enjoying some cold beers. I like the mechanics of a bike and figuring out how to take components apart, optimal adjustment etc. I can't get enough of tools, manuals, tutorials, etc.

    I do understand the attraction of simplicity though, and just bought a singlespeed road bike. Whenever I want to simply get out and pedal, & not think about too much, it's waiting patiently.
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  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by barticus
    Where's the fun in having less control, poorer braking, less traction and lower speed? Someone, enlighten me!
    Fun is where you find it. Fun has much more to do with the attitude of the person riding than it does with the equipment.

    If you don't think this looks fun, I really can't "enlighten" you further.

    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/11782596?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;c olor=ff9933" width="600" height="338" frameborder="0"></iframe>
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by barticus
    Rigid is great for mountain bikes unless you ride actual mountain bike trails.... Where's the fun in having less control, poorer braking, less traction and lower speed? Someone, enlighten me!
    by that same logic anyone who isn't running the most advanced bike possible isn't having fun. Might as well add an engine too, because they're going slower without one, and that can't be fun either.

    My point is, you are drawing a somewhat arbitrary line about fun vs not fun, because there could always be a person with a better bike than yours who is actually having fun and wondering how you could possibly enjoy riding with that thing.

    Sometimes the fun is the challenge; in having to push yourself in new techniques and skills. Even once you've got the skills, rigid still places more of the burden on the rider to do well than the bike and some people enjoy that

    Plus you might want to dial back the arrogance more than just a little bit about those Alps

  78. #78
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    Riding rigid is not for people who are happy riding suspension. All the majority of them are going to do is complain.

  79. #79
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    Strangely I've ridden some things on the rigid I won't / don't ride on, don't like the way forks compress when your going down steep stuff which pushes your weight forward, rigid keeps you back better.


    But turning the compression dial on the Reba fork will likely do similar

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by barticus
    Rigid is great for mountain bikes unless you ride actual mountain bike trails.
    Silly me. I thought all those rocky, skinny paths leading to and fro through the deserts, foothills, and mountains of Colorado on which I've been riding my rigid mountain bike were "actual mountain bike trails." I must have been led astray by the other bike riders on them that I have been passing. I will inform them post haste.
    "Fact is only what you believe; fact and fiction work as a team." Jack Johnson

  81. #81
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    Rigid feels like all your old bikes that you grew up on (unless your young). My first mountain bikes, bmx, banana seat Schwinn bike were rigid.

  82. #82
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    because it is cheap
    because it is yet another way to experience cycling
    because you can

  83. #83
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    My first bike was a fully rigid Trek from the 80's. I still have it and ride it because I like how connected I feel to a trail. I don't drive it over to a trail, but I ride it in the fields and through the hoods.

    Building a new ss 29er right now, and a rigid White Bros is going on the front. I've still got a Fox fork so that if I change my mind I can swap. But that is the luxury of having both. I will usually run a 1x9 and a squishy front fork for the trails that I haven't ever tried before. Bet for the ones I know, the rigid is just fine. I decided I wanted rigid on the new bike for the feel, and to try something different. Never know till you try. If I hadn't tried out a 29er I'd still be 20 pounds heavier and riding the lifts to come down on a 9 inch travel bike. Give it a shot. If you don't like it dump it.

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    That and the fact that I'm not trying to beat anyone. I just ride for fun.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny the boy
    ran rigid for 8 months and finally came to the realization that suspension was invented for a reason.
    why take a step backwards?
    Good - at least you tried it and decided it wasn't for you, which is a lot more than a lot of people who diss rigid have done.

    I would just counter that path of biking history (like anything else) is paved with myriad well-marketed inventions that were not necessarily improvements. Sometimes inventions help, sometimes they actually hurt, but more often than not they are a step sideways. We're not talking about the invention of the steam engine here.
    My other bike is a /7.

  86. #86
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    I'm not trying to sound like a jerk - but riding rigid is not really a big deal. Personally, I prefer rigid... but when you grow up BMX'ing, seriously, the squish is difficult to get used to.

    I remember the first time riding a suspension fork and standing up to sprint, and the awkward feeling of that thing bouncing was horrible. I've crashed more times because of fork dive on a suspension fork than I have with the controllability factor of a rigid. I mean, going fast downhill, the suspension is great. But slower technical trails and climbing, I choose rigid.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by barticus
    Rigid is great for mountain bikes unless you ride actual mountain bike trails.
    Of course. The trails we ride on in the GWNF were never designed for bikes. Come and see. In fact next weekend you'll see a number of people riding these non-challenging non-mountain bike trails in the SM 100 on rigid single speeds.

  88. #88
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    I don't ride rigid because it is some kind of manly badge on honor. I have rode 100% rigid since 2005 because:

    1. The places I ride the most, don't require suspension... and in some ways, it's better not to have it.

    2. No maintenance, and very cheap. Salsa Cromoto is $80. Used Waltworks is $150.

    3. Weight... easiest way to drop a few pounds on my bike without dropping big $$$.

    4. I'm a better biker without suspension. Better handler, better climber.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbaier
    Good - at least you tried it and decided it wasn't for you, which is a lot more than a lot of people who diss rigid have done.

    I would just counter that path of biking history (like anything else) is paved with myriad well-marketed inventions that were not necessarily improvements. Sometimes inventions help, sometimes they actually hurt, but more often than not they are a step sideways. We're not talking about the invention of the steam engine here.
    i went from an s-works carbon hardtial w/ full xtr to a single speed rigid.
    ran it for 2 months with a sus fork and 8 months with a rigid and i kept trying to like it, trying to convince myself i'd come to like it, but it just kept kicking my ass.
    just couldn't do it anymore.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny the boy
    i went from an s-works carbon hardtial w/ full xtr to a single speed rigid.
    ran it for 2 months with a sus fork and 8 months with a rigid and i kept trying to like it, trying to convince myself i'd come to like it, but it just kept kicking my ass.
    just couldn't do it anymore.

    Try it with a FAT Tyre, IE Rubber Queen 2.4 ran SOFT 26" or a Ardent 2.4 Softish 29" , on a wide rim and some of those Azonic Double Wall bars or something equally as noodly and flexy.


    It's been a pet project since March to upgrade my rigid to get it as rideable as I can, while keeping the costs as low as possible.

    I still can't decide which rides best the RQ2.4 26" or the Ardent 2.4 29" the RQ2.4 felt rubbish till I dropped the pressure and got it spot on then roots disapeared like I had forks.

  91. #91
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    i ran a velocity blunt wheelset (28mm internal width) tubeless @ 28psi with 2.1 high volume s-works tires...can't get much more plush than that.
    it just didn't work.
    wide tires AREN'T a substitute for suspension.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny the boy
    wide tires AREN'T a substitute for suspension.
    Yes, they are.
    A 2.4 RoRo at 21 psi is a very nice front suspension for a rigid fork. I have an 18.9 lb carbon hardtail/carbon fork that is pretty comfy for a rigid bike, and has razor sharp handling, with little maintenance. It's also a lot faster than my FS bike on many of the trails I ride on. I can fly up a hill and save more time than bombing down one with FS.
    A rigid fork isn't for everybody of course, but maybe you didn't get you setup tuned to get the most out of it.

  93. #93
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    I like that a rigid fork is not on my bike.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny the boy
    i ran a velocity blunt wheelset (28mm internal width) tubeless @ 28psi with 2.1 high volume s-works tires...can't get much more plush than that.
    it just didn't work.
    wide tires AREN'T a substitute for suspension.

    Try a Rubber Queen 2.4 ( HUGE Volume ) 26" or a Ardent 2.4 29", I can run the 26" RQ 2.4 much softer before it goes all squirmy which really helps, gives me 50mm's of plush effective suspension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny the boy
    wide tires AREN'T a substitute for suspension.
    Correct, they just take the edge off.
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  96. #96
    mtbr member
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    Sep 2007
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    3,330
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenLightGo
    Correct, they just take the edge off.

    Your arms are your suspension, although I admit it's not the same as suspension under your frame.

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