Superfly 8 vs 7, or really, Reba vs Float- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Superfly 8 vs 7, or really, Reba vs Float

    Superfly 8 RIDE TO WIN SALE | Trek | 29er Mountain Bikes for sale in Melbourne | 102270023

    Superfly 7 | Trek | 29er Mountain Bikes for sale in Morley | 102504661

    The 7 is 300 dollars cheaper but it's missing a Float 32, SLX cranks and mech and a Bontrager X Lite stem.

    However, according to the "TREK BENELUX WEIGHT LIST 2014", they are both the same weight of 11.3kg.

    So this leads me to the question: is the Float and that sick orange paint job worth the extra 300?

    I don't care about the SLX at all. The cranks are only better looking and I'm going to ditch the mech anyway so it doesn't matter. And I can always get used crank-arms if I'm vain enough.

    I'd prefer the fork that is easier to service and is lower maintenance. But what does the float have over the reba?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjasstolemytv View Post
    I'd prefer the fork that is easier to service and is lower maintenance. But what does the float have over the reba?

    Thanks
    A Fox sticker is really all the Fox has that the RockShox doesn't. It has CTD (Climb Trail Descend) which is technically 3 fork positions that you cannot alter in any way. The RockShox has rebound adjustment and lockout that are able to be changed to fit your riding style.
    But I would still buy the 8 over the 7 because for $300, the SLX is a really nice upgrade (And the orange paint job and SLX crank look better).
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  3. #3
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    Does the SLX crank save that much weight? Aesthetics aside, I'm going to swap to 1x10 anyway so the weight difference would be negligible wouldn't it?

    Trek is real smart to make the bike look that much better at that price.

    Edit: it also has SLX brakes over deore. Maybe I could negotiate the price of the 8 to the 7 by swapping the fork?

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    Superfly 9.6 (19.5") | Trek | 29er Mountain Bikes for sale in Caulfield South | 102540455
    This bike.
    I'm riding the 9.8 because of a special build opportunity. The 9.6 is a much better deal for the money. Deore brakes are essentially the same performance as SLX(same pad). Rebas need much less service than a Fox. Do not like the crank. Swap out.
    The new carbon frame was developed with Trek's road bike engineers for exceptional compliance. It is a major upgrade over other carbon hardtails and even more over an aluminum frame. Lifetime warranty on the frame. Worth it.

  5. #5
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    Hmm the carbon series is fairly out of my price range. I think I might just go with a used Superfly 8. Maybe even swap for a Reba.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjasstolemytv View Post
    Does the SLX crank save that much weight? Aesthetics aside, I'm going to swap to 1x10 anyway so the weight difference would be negligible wouldn't it?

    Trek is real smart to make the bike look that much better at that price.

    Edit: it also has SLX brakes over deore. Maybe I could negotiate the price of the 8 to the 7 by swapping the fork?
    The Reba is about the same price as the EVO Float (maybe $80 cheaper). If you are going to upgrade right away, you can get a nice crankset for $300 to go 1x10 so that actually might be a better option.
    Dropping into a trail

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjasstolemytv View Post
    Hmm the carbon series is fairly out of my price range. I think I might just go with a used Superfly 8. Maybe even swap for a Reba.
    Go with a used 9.6 then. It is closer to a fs in ride with trail feel. You should demo both versions to see carbon vs aluminum.

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    @cannondale So are you saying to go with the 7?

    @eb I'll try that out. I've never ridden a carbon bike before so that should be interesting. Although, it's there really much difference in a race situation? Would the extra dampening make me faster?

  9. #9
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    There are lots of different 'race' conditions. And a racer doesn't stop with a stock bike.
    Wheels, tires and most importantly the engine have effect.
    The carbon bike will beat you up much less the longer you ride it in a race.
    The more compliant rear will retain contact traction better climbing over bumps.
    You can further increase that with the added tire compliance with more volume and lower psi from a wide(30mm inside) wheelset like Wide Lightnings or carbons.
    You will be faster and be able to ride longer in bumpy conditions without getting tired or sore.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjasstolemytv View Post
    @cannondale So are you saying to go with the 7?
    You can save $300 on the 7 from the 8 and then buy a crankset that is $300 or less so you can actually save some money and then upgrade the brakes and other parts of the drivetrain over time.
    Deore brakes are still good quality brakes, but if in time you want to upgrade, buy XTs. Same with the rear derailleur.
    Dropping into a trail

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  11. #11
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    The 8 is the better deal. It has the SLX crank, brakes, rear derailleur, and the Fox fork. With those parts...it makes it a much nicer bike. If you plan on going 1x10 and plan on adding a 40 or 42T cog...the SLX RD will work with the OneUp RAD cage.

    With the 8...you don't need to swap out parts. By switching out those parts out later on...you'll be spending more than the 300 dollar difference. If the Fox fork is a 2014 it will have the updated CTD cartridge.

    I've serviced my own Fox forks...all three of them...and if its only seals and oil...its not that much different than any other fork.

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    @eb1888 I might get a carbon for my second. I don't race enough to justify the purchase. I can hardly justify the purchase for the 8 anyway, but thanks for your advice. The 500g weight difference isn't very significant to me either.

    @CannondaleF9 Nah, I've already decided on a used 8. But thanks anyway.

    @RS VR6 How often do you service your forks? Do you have to replace the seals every time? Would you recommend just doing this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eh-sIrnC8xs for service each time?

  13. #13
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    If you get a chance demo a 9.6.
    It's not about racing.
    As I've been saying, the engineering in the 9.6 is totally not primarily about the weight.
    Trek had a crappy carbon Superfly last year that was lightweight.
    It beat the rider up just like an aluminum bike does.
    This bike is like Trek's carbon road bikes. Good compliance sells those bikes for big bucks. No compliance=no sale. For offroad it's comfort when you ride for many hours over challenging terrain. Buy this bike and you won't need to buy a second bike. A big long-term money saver.
    Buy what you want. But don't think the 9.6 is about saving weight. Find out about it before you ignore it.

  14. #14
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    Fox recommends every 30 hours. I honestly don't think you need to to it every 30...you can go a bit longer. I just did my fork after 6 or 7 months and the oil came out pretty clean. I also did my GF's fork after almost a year (way over the 30 hours)...and the oil was still clean. I live in So Cal...so we don't get much by way of weather. Its been dusty here since we didn't get much rain.

    I change the seals...since the fork legs are already off. I know a couple guys that just change the oil...and do the seals every other oil change. If the fork starts to push up oil...then you know its time to change the seals.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    If you get a chance demo a 9.6.
    It's not about racing.
    As I've been saying, the engineering in the 9.6 is totally not primarily about the weight.
    Trek had a crappy carbon Superfly last year that was lightweight.
    It beat the rider up just like an aluminum bike does.
    This bike is like Trek's carbon road bikes. Good compliance sells those bikes for big bucks. No compliance=no sale. For offroad it's comfort when you ride for many hours over challenging terrain. Buy this bike and you won't need to buy a second bike. A big long-term money saver.
    Buy what you want. But don't think the 9.6 is about saving weight. Find out about it before you ignore it.
    if comfort was the goal, why wouldn't a guy just buy a superfly 100? a bit more weight but a lot less punishing to ride for a few hours than any HT i've ever been on

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    @eb1888 I don't deny the benefits of carbon, but I'm not all that serious to justify the purchase. I only race occasionally and I don't do any crazy 24hr enduro stuff.

    Besides, I've been riding a shitty alloy bike for so long it doesn't really matter to me anyway. If I wanted comfort I may as well get a FS like Racebum said. It's not like I'm sitting when I'm bombing downhill either.

    @RS VR6 Okay, that sounds good. I might service every 4mths and see how I go. Are there any tell tale signs of when you need to replace your oil? And can I just use any 10w

  17. #17
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    The fox evo is trash, see the suspension forum.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  18. #18
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    Hmm. You reckon the shop would let me swap fork from the lower end model?

  19. #19
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    I got my wife a SF 7 this spring and I ride a SF 9.8. The 7 is a great bike. I agree the FSA crankset looks a little funny but it works fine. I have ridden it a few times and its a great bike. The new geometry is an improvement over the SF aluminum my son has from last year. Carbon absorbs more vibration but the 7 rides fine. The biggest different is between deore and true XT shifters. Much more crisp on the 9.8. Haven't ridden but have seen the SF 8 in person. Having ridden a 7 though I know that you would be happy.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjasstolemytv View Post
    Hmm. You reckon the shop would let me swap fork from the lower end model?
    Probably not. The forks come in the boxes with the frames and components. What the bike has is what the bike gets, unless you purchase another fork separately and have them put it on instead of the fork it comes with.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by racebum View Post
    if comfort was the goal, why wouldn't a guy just buy a superfly 100? a bit more weight but a lot less punishing to ride for a few hours than any HT i've ever been on
    It's not the goal but a goal. Others are lighter weight, trail feel, simpler with zero pivot maintenance, zero pivot component replacement, less initial cost/lb. than a full suspension.
    It makes a 100mm fs obsolete for most riders.
    It's different than any HT I've been on too- because of the engineered compliance.
    It is a new category, like a fs hardtail. You have to ride one to fit it where it belongs.
    Both the 9.6 and the 8 also benefit from new geo. 435mm(10 shorter) chain stays and 5mm lower bb than the 9.9 SL. With the 51mm offset the steering is no effort quick but stable still at speed.

    The fork swap is unlikely because you can't buy a G2 fork separately.

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