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  1. #1
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    Standover Clearance Issues

    I'm new to the 29er thing. I'm coming off multiple "medium" sized 26ers I bought a "medium" 29er ht. The only issue I'm having is the standover of my 29er is dramatically higher than my last two 26er (1 a FS and 1 a HT). I feel like the bike fits me ok once I'm riding and in the groove, I'm feeling a the "squeeze" when I have to jump down off the seat when I stop.

    Is this a common thing to 29ers? Should I really worry about tight standover clearance?

  2. #2
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    This is a pretty hotly debated topic here. Overall, the most important dimension should be the top tube length because it has the most influence on whether you are comfortable on the bike. For shorter folks, standover clearance is a concern, but how often do you have to straddle the top tube in an off-camber situation? If you're riding mostly XC and can anticipate when you step off the bike/don't have too many quick dismounts, you should be ok. That said, there are plenty of 29er frames with dramatically sloping or bent top tubes to provide more standover clearance. Some that immediately come to mind are Niners, Vassago, On-One, and others. Some that I see that tend to have less sloping/higher clearance: Specialized, Voodoo, Kona, etc.
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  3. #3
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    What is the opinion with this picture?

    Here is a picture of me standing over the bike. I realize that it is not showing the actual amount of distance, but does this look acceptable considering the top-tube length feels good?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Standover Clearance Issues-standover.jpg  


  4. #4
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    Thats how i look and feel on both my medium 29ers. Over the last couple years i haven't had any incidents where i was even worried about standover clearence.

    i'm 5'8 ... cycling inseam is 30in and i've felt that fit of 29ers feel better to me because of my longer torso and their longer top tube. So if i were you, i definitely wouldn't worry about it, just ride on.

    By comparison, i've demo'd some 26ers in my size that have had less standover than my TNT sultan, or Redline Flight.

  5. #5
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    The only time I think about standover is when I'm remounting the bike, and you learn soon enough to always mount the thing from the high side of the trail.
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  6. #6
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    Standover height is not a concern for me. I am 6" and have the large Razzo. From the picture my standover from the top tube is about the same as yours.

    The ETT length is much more important.

  7. #7
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    If you keep shaving, it just grows thicker... LOL
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    I went from a med. Dos Niner to a sm. EMD. My mind is way more at ease knowing my nuts are out of harms way. I am more confident to try a section because I have more clearance.My balls and top tubes don't mix.

  9. #9
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    I dont understand the thinking on standover. The only time it is relevant is when you are standing on a perfectly flat surface with the bike between your legs. Any other time when you need to make an emergency dismount this situation is unlikely.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TR
    I dont understand the thinking on standover. The only time it is relevant is when you are standing on a perfectly flat surface with the bike between your legs. Any other time when you need to make an emergency dismount this situation is unlikely.
    I'm with you on that,I brought my bike to ride not stand over & pose for pictures.

    Stand over height is a safety net for people that can't ride I guess.
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  11. #11
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    op, redo that photo. straddle over the bike and lift the wheels. see how much you clear. you can do video mode on the camera, maybe put an object of known size on the ground, and then take screen shots of the part the of the video where you lift the wheel. this is what i did when i had the same question as you (not for a 29er). or nevermind all that trouble of camera work...just lift the wheels and see for yourself.

    i share your concerns for standover. this is the only reason why i haven't ordered my trek cobia just yet (my cycling inseam is 32.2" w/o shoes whereas cobia SO is 30.5"). i prefer 2-3" clearance but at some point i'm going to need that 29er and have to compromise.

    good luck! you should be fine based on above picture. get riding

  12. #12
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    Thanks for feedback, I'm over the standover and just want to take it out for a ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dial Tone
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    BTW: Legs are not and have not been shaved. Maybe I'll start if it makes me faster

    I measured my 26er and my 29er and it turns out the 29er fits so much better in ETT, but lacks the clearance, while the 26er has the clearance but I have the seatpost at max height and the seat pushed back and the stem out to 110mm. So if you consider all that, a little standover compromise is worth it. I'll post back after my big ride on Monday.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TR
    I dont understand the thinking on standover. The only time it is relevant is when you are standing on a perfectly flat surface with the bike between your legs. Any other time when you need to make an emergency dismount this situation is unlikely.
    it is important to have standover when mounting the saddle or resting over the top tube when i'm taking a break and drinking water or chatting with my buddy. i agree that you don't need 4" of SO as some insist on having but i personally need to be able to lift the wheel 2" off the ground when straddling over it. it gives you a piece of mind. one only needs to crunch his nuts once

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by common_man
    it gives you a piece of mind. one only needs to crunch his nuts once

    I am sorry but I disagree.

    If you have a crash you are more likely to smack your nuts into the stem or the TT closer up towards the stem than you are to fall directly down and hit them on the TT where you are measuring your standover.

    I have very close to nil standover on my Blacksheep as a result of the upwardly curving TT and slightly better standover on the Tallboy because of the downward curve of the TT.
    It was not a consideration whatsoever when I bought them as I was more interested in having an ETT measurement that fit.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by irun22fast
    I'm new to the 29er thing. I'm coming off multiple "medium" sized 26ers I bought a "medium" 29er ht. The only issue I'm having is the standover of my 29er is dramatically higher than my last two 26er (1 a FS and 1 a HT). I feel like the bike fits me ok once I'm riding and in the groove, I'm feeling a the "squeeze" when I have to jump down off the seat when I stop.

    Is this a common thing to 29ers? Should I really worry about tight standover clearance?
    Bing a short legged guy with long arms and torso, I have ended up with bikes with ZERO stand over clearance. It has never, ever, (not once) been an issue except when standing flat-footed over the top tube. Never an issue on emergency exits, hitting my nuts, nothing. Total non-issue while riding. Yes, swinging the leg over to get on is a tad more awkward, but not enough to make me think of not getting a bike because of it.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TR
    I am sorry but I disagree.

    If you have a crash you are more likely to smack your nuts into the stem or the TT closer up towards the stem than you are to fall directly down and hit them on the TT where you are measuring your standover.

    I have very close to nil standover on my Blacksheep as a result of the upwardly curving TT and slightly better standover on the Tallboy because of the downward curve of the TT.
    It was not a consideration whatsoever when I bought them as I was more interested in having an ETT measurement that fit.
    i don't disagree with any of this. i agree 100% with the above and don't want to repeat what you said. for an emergency stop, i would rather stay in position and let the rubber and breaks do a better stop than my shoes!

    for the rest we can agree to disagree. but let me clear...i measure SO upto pubic bone like rivendell. by this method, it's OK to have the boys brush the TT. i'd measure that as around 2" SO whereas someone using the boys to measure would say 0.

    having clarified this, i notice that when i'm stopping to take a break sometimes i hop off the saddle onto the TT without even noticing. that's possible with some SO and i like it. i guess i'm in the middle...i don't insist on having 3" SO...but at the same time i'm not like some people who are perfectly OK with little or no SO.

    bottom line is your set up works for you. you're comfortable and happy. OP will have to use his discretion. definitely, though, TT is most important. it's nice to have everything but if one needs to compromise ETT shouldn't be the one.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by irun22fast
    I'll post back after my big ride on Monday.
    well, how was your ride?

    i'm in the exact same boat as you and have to make the same exact decision. if i'm on a 26er the seat post will be really, really high and i'll feel cramped. the 29er will provide a nice TT but less clearance. i'm leaning towards the latter.

    what have you decided? how do you feel with your new bike?

    stand over should be measured by moving the boys aside and lifting the TT to the perineum with decent pressure. 2" of lifting the wheels off the ground should be ideal IMO. any less - just be clever with the dismount.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    Bing a short legged guy with long arms and torso, I have ended up with bikes with ZERO stand over clearance. It has never, ever, (not once) been an issue except when standing flat-footed over the top tube. Never an issue on emergency exits, hitting my nuts, nothing. Total non-issue while riding. Yes, swinging the leg over to get on is a tad more awkward, but not enough to make me think of not getting a bike because of it.
    I am built the same exact way and agree 100% what you say. I have ZERO stand over clearance of my GF but its never been an issue.
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  19. #19
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    Looks fine if your TT length is good for you. I have very little standover clearance on my 17: 29er and it fits great, rides great.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TR
    I dont understand the thinking on standover. The only time it is relevant is when you are standing on a perfectly flat surface with the bike between your legs. Any other time when you need to make an emergency dismount this situation is unlikely.
    I disagree. This has been the one thing holding me back from 29ers. A lot of the trails I ride have steep switchbacks after arduous climbs. Often, I need to stop to catch my breath. Or, I sometimes spin out on slippery trails/rocks. A bike with a high standover results in my nuts meeting the top tube if I fall or slip, or the bike falls on me when my body is at an angle trying to reach the ground. Likewise, a bike with a high top tube is harder to re-mount on an incline. I don't want to have to mount a horse everytime I need to stop to adjust something, catch my breath, eat a powerbar, screw up, etc.

    It is much easier to get back going on an incline if you have one foot clipped in and at least your toe touching the ground so you can center your balance fore/aft. Trying to swing a leg, hop, move the bike laterally to be upright, clip, pedal, and put weight forward in one single stroke is rather difficult.

    Yes, I know this will become less of a problem as my endurance/skills improve, but I am not going to plop 1K on a bike that sheers off my nads everytime I make a mistake. I am not saying that standover should be the sole factor, but it is an issue for shorter people like myself.

    As it is, I would prefer my medium sized 26er to have a shorter standover height.

    just my 2 cents.

  21. #21
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    Razzo 29er Ride Report

    I posted a thorough ride report in the Sette Forum, under the Post your Razzo thread. I think that should say enough about the ride. Standover clearance was a non-issue, in fact I even noticed that a couple of times I did stand over the bike and on the trail, there was more clearance than at home in the driveway due to trail irregularities and angles.

    Basically, I was very pleased with the bike fit and feel and have started customizing the bike to suit my preferences now that I'm sure I'll be keeping it.

  22. #22
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  23. #23
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    Big stand over clearance is only desirable by those who have good bike handling skills (or those who aspire...). Its more than just the risk of nut crunching. A lower top tube allows a lower seat which is useful for bunny hops, manuals, hopping over logs, ledges, anything that requires a lot of body english. Being able to drop the seat down to or below the top of the rear tire is best. Also, for side-to-side ballance, it is useful to be able to move the knees freely without hitting the top tube when your feet are in the 3 and 9 position. When I borrow a bike with a high top tube I hit my knees on it while riding a wheelie or even just doing a track stand while setting up for a technical move. If you ride a bike with extra high stand over for long enough to acquire some new skills, then there is no going back. And this is coming from someone with some pretty average skills, but with some really fun newly acquired skills.

    "V" style frames are one of the best designs for stand over, but I suppose they have some disadvantages.

    I can understand someone coming from a roadie background not minding a high top tube (I am an X roadie). And I can see it not being a problem for cruising on easy trails. But does anyone actually prefer a high top tube? Is there any benefit? Do manufacturers just not want their bikes to look like the old "girls" bikes?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pureslop
    Big stand over clearance is only desirable by those who have good bike handling skills (or those who aspire...). Its more than just the risk of nut crunching. A lower top tube allows a lower seat which is useful for bunny hops, manuals, hopping over logs, ledges, anything that requires a lot of body english. Being able to drop the seat down to or below the top of the rear tire is best. Also, for side-to-side ballance, it is useful to be able to move the knees freely without hitting the top tube when your feet are in the 3 and 9 position. When I borrow a bike with a high top tube I hit my knees on it while riding a wheelie or even just doing a track stand while setting up for a technical move. If you ride a bike with extra high stand over for long enough to acquire some new skills, then there is no going back. And this is coming from someone with some pretty average skills, but with some really fun newly acquired skills.

    "V" style frames are one of the best designs for stand over, but I suppose they have some disadvantages.

    I can understand someone coming from a roadie background not minding a high top tube (I am an X roadie). And I can see it not being a problem for cruising on easy trails. But does anyone actually prefer a high top tube? Is there any benefit? Do manufacturers just not want their bikes to look like the old "girls" bikes?
    Ummm, I have ridden bikes with zero stand over, yet could still drop my seat at least 6". That is far more than enough for any of the situations you are describing. I'm a big fan of dropping the saddle, but rarely if ever dropped it more than about 4 inches. Also, even a bike with zero standover will not interfere with your knees with the pedals @ 3 and 9. I know this from experience (my Karate Monkey, Heckler, MKIII all had/have and inch or less stadover)

    If you want a bike with a seat collar well below the top of the rear tire (which you would need to get the saddle level with the top of rear tire), you would need something like a 13-14" seat tube on a 29er, even shorter for a 26er (do I need to go into the ramifications of this?). They make bikes like that, trials and bmx. Great for tricks, but not for general trail riding.

    No I don't think anyone actually PREFERS less standover, but it is really far down on the list of priorities. The reason some people have little stand over is because a company will shoot for a design that will work with the widest variety and sizes of riders. Those of us at the far (short-legged) end of the bell curve deal with less standover, but if you know how to ride, it is not a big deal. A non-issue.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  25. #25
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    I agree with you that no one PREFERS less stand over.

    Please go into the ramifications of a 14" seat tube. All I can think of is the need for a really long post, which then limits how far it will drop. But with all the telescoping dropper posts out there now, this problem is mostly solved.

    Oh, one more problem, long posts tend to be more prone to breaking. But thats only a problem for people who sit on their ass going over bumps. Breakage is an easy problem to engineer a fix - plus the added flex with a long post makes for a much smoother ride, especially on a hard tail.

    So seriously, why not more stand over, especially for technical riding? I see all pros and no cons. The way my riding style has evolved I can't imagine going back to a bike with an inch or so of stand over.

  26. #26
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    Standover hasn't been an issue...

    I have ridden twice on my bike since the original post, and there has been zero issues. I honestly forgot about that by the time I was on the trail. I never was even remotely bothered by any issue related to the height of the TT. I have enough clearance to stand over my bike when the occasion comes and can even dismount to the center if need be. I only have about 1 to 1.25 inches of clearance, but that is enough for a strict cross country/ endurance racing bike. I have plenty of seatpost showing, it in no way looks like a bike that is too big for the rider when you see it. (Frequently dealt with these while working as a wrench when customers brought in bikes bought on craigslist or ebay).

    I can see the concerns about being able to move around on the bike, but I'm not out there doing freestyle, and certainly am not taking huge drops or jumps on a 24 pound 29er hardtail.

    I think the standover clearance of my bike would be inadequate for the type of riding described above, but that is clearly not the purpose of this bike. I can push the bike through corners, move on top of the bike on big carving turns, and can rail high speed descents thanks to the bigger wheels.

    One nice thing about the taller TT is that on very high speed road descents I can squeeze the TT with my lower knee areas to help prevent any speed wobble (if you've ever experienced this, it is the most terrifying experience you can have because you have so long to think about how bad its going to hurt). When coming down steep mountain roads, this feature is nice, and is something I could never do on bikes with less SO.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by irun22fast
    I have ridden twice on my bike since the original post, and there has been zero issues. I honestly forgot about that by the time I was on the trail.
    of course you weren't bothered...you have plenty of SO! my apologies if i have misunderstood you or assumed too much. people talk about clearance without really defining it. clearance between TT and the boys? or clearance between the TT and the perineum / pubic bone? big difference. if you have 1" gap between TT and the boys - you have PLENTY of SO. even a hairline of gap or close to 0 is good by that method. on the other hand, if you lift the wheel all the way until it hits an immovable part of your body i.e. your perineum / pubic bone...and then have only 1" clearance...i assure you won't be jumping onto the middle of the TT

    Quote Originally Posted by irun22fast
    I only have about 1 to 1.25 inches of clearance.
    clearance between TT and the boys OR clearance between TT and an immovable part of the body i.e. perineum?

    to be clear, i agree that SO gets less priority than proper fit while riding. but do want to make sure we're all talking on the same page.

  28. #28
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    Please go into the ramifications of a 14" seat tube. All I can think of is the need for a really long post, which then limits how far it will drop. But with all the telescoping dropper posts out there now, this problem is mostly solved.
    The largest dropper post that I am aware of is only 5".
    Oh, one more problem, long posts tend to be more prone to breaking. But thats only a problem for people who sit on their ass going over bumps. Breakage is an easy problem to engineer a fix - plus the added flex with a long post makes for a much smoother ride, especially on a hard tail.
    No it is not just going over bumps.

    So seriously, why not more stand over, especially for technical riding? I see all pros and no cons. The way my riding style has evolved I can't imagine going back to a bike with an inch or so of stand over.
    I think you are missing the point of the OP. Like it or not, this is the way they size bikes. For whatever reason, they don't like the idea of bikes needing 16" of exposed seatpost (and you could not drop it those 16", anyway). The question is, as someone with short legs, is standover worth not getting a bike over, and the answer is NO, it is really a non-issue. It sounds to me like you have had some good realizations on body english technique, but have not yet learned how to apply it to a non-trials bike setup. Has it occured to you that we are already doing what you are talking about, but don't need all that standover to do it?

    Besides, do you stop and drop your saddle all the way to the seat collar every time you come across a log pile, drop, etc? Cause you are certainly not doing that with a dropper post.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  29. #29
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    The Rase Black Mamba has 9" of drop. Several other dropper posts have 5", with multiple positions in between. I adjust my seat height every time I come to a terrain feature. That's kind of the whole point of a dropper post - to instantly turn your cross country bike into a rad bike without breaking up the flow of the trail.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by pureslop
    The Rase Black Mamba has 9" of drop. Several other dropper posts have 5", with multiple positions in between. I adjust my seat height every time I come to a terrain feature. That's kind of the whole point of a dropper post - to instantly turn your cross country bike into a rad bike without breaking up the flow of the trail.
    But you can still use a dropper post on a bike with little stand-over. I do.

    Are you telling me you can drop your saddle to be level with the top of your rear wheel with your dropper post? What kind are you running? Any pics of this setup?
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

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    Sorry no picture.......I forgot that I was on the 29er forum.

    26ers - plenty of choices that accomplish this.

    29ers - I am going to have to go custom. There are no production or even boutique frames out there that combine 16.5 ish (short) chain stays with a bent top tube for max clearance.

    I am super psyched about the roll over ability of the 29er wheels on technical terrain and can't wait to get a bike built that will eliminate some of the negatives of the 29ers that I have tried so far.

    To the OP, if you are happy so far and don't want standover, AWESOME!

    I guess my rant is more directed to frame designers and based on the fact that so many people have tried a dropper post and are blown away by how it changed the fun factor and how they are willing to try things that they wouldn't previously. The thinking goes from, "Dropper posts are stupid, I can ride anything without it, they are heavy, I have no problem getting my butt behind my seat", to, "Holly crap, the dropper is awesome, I will never have another bike without it, I am clearing stuff I never would have even tried before", etc, etc.

    I think the discussion on top tube height is currently not but should be directly related to the recent evolution on dropper posts. The attitude that, "My 1" stand over clearance bike is just fine, I can do everything on it", well thats cool, to each his own, but if everyone thought that way humans would still be in the stone age.

  32. #32
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    Cool-blue Rhythm SO overrated?

    Not that it makes a big difference, but, is there an official stand over measurement point for all bikes (halfway point of TT )? From the OP pic it looks like he is standing further back from where the SO measurement would be calculated. He could get more "unofficial" SO by having a setback seatpost and a shorter stem (similar cockpit geo, but with a little more weight over rear tire) allowing him to stand further back on his TT...doesn't change the manufacturer's SO measurement, but will provide more clearance for precious cargo when standing flat footed.

    Anywho...for those who like lower SO 29ers, there is always this option:
    http://www.ewrbikes.com/owb29er_specs

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by pureslop
    Sorry no picture.......I forgot that I was on the 29er forum.

    26ers - plenty of choices that accomplish this.

    29ers - I am going to have to go custom. There are no production or even boutique frames out there that combine 16.5 ish (short) chain stays with a bent top tube for max clearance.

    I am super psyched about the roll over ability of the 29er wheels on technical terrain and can't wait to get a bike built that will eliminate some of the negatives of the 29ers that I have tried so far.

    To the OP, if you are happy so far and don't want standover, AWESOME!

    I guess my rant is more directed to frame designers and based on the fact that so many people have tried a dropper post and are blown away by how it changed the fun factor and how they are willing to try things that they wouldn't previously. The thinking goes from, "Dropper posts are stupid, I can ride anything without it, they are heavy, I have no problem getting my butt behind my seat", to, "Holly crap, the dropper is awesome, I will never have another bike without it, I am clearing stuff I never would have even tried before", etc, etc.

    I think the discussion on top tube height is currently not but should be directly related to the recent evolution on dropper posts. The attitude that, "My 1" stand over clearance bike is just fine, I can do everything on it", well thats cool, to each his own, but if everyone thought that way humans would still be in the stone age.
    i went to the lbs today. the impression i got is that there's a trade off with a 26er vs a 29er. a 29er will have 3" taller wheels in the front so your handlebars will be higher. nice and comfortable. this is why 29ers come with flat handlebars whereas 26er come with risers (trek). for the same reasons, your stand over clearance will be lower on the 29er because the greater diameter wheels give less clearance. this is why it's not uncommon for people on 29ers to have less SO.

    so there's the trade off
    26: more stand over, lower handlebars
    29er: less stand over, higher handlebars

    when my 29er pre-order arrives, if i have the minimal SO clearance so that i can just straddle over the TT OK, i'm definitely going for it. i'll take the higher handlebars due to geometry and not riser stems or bars.

  34. #34
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    All else constant, there is a 1.5" difference in height going to a 29er.

    Bar height is relatively easy to change. Actually all of the cockpit is easy to dial in to taste. Stand over, unfortunately, is fixed, and on most 29ers, the top tube is too damn high.

  35. #35
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    advantages to higher tt

    Quote Originally Posted by pureslop
    All else constant, there is a 1.5" difference in height going to a 29er.

    Bar height is relatively easy to change. Actually all of the cockpit is easy to dial in to taste. Stand over, unfortunately, is fixed, and on most 29ers, the top tube is too damn high.
    I can say that besides the descending characteristics mentioned above (steep mountain roads) the other really nice thing is that I can finally run two bottle cages inside my frame. This is especially nice since my primary purpose in buying this bike is to race endurance races. I have not noticed any handling shortcomings of having a slightly higher tt than on my 26" giant hardtail or my specialized FSRXC. I think when I was all said and done with my bike fit that the handlebars were in roughly the same position as on my other two bikes. They may be a bit higher, but so is the overall saddle height, so they feel pretty much the same (better on the 29er slightly).

    Could you try to describe exactly why the TT height effects handling again? I'm confused but want to go try this and see if I can experience the same difficulties.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by pureslop
    All else constant, there is a 1.5" difference in height going to a 29er.
    Just to clarify, there is a 1 1/2" AXLE height difference. Bottom bracket and corresponding saddle height are the same as a 26er, given slight BB height variances based on the type of bike, tire size, etc. That is why you sit down between the wheels more on a 29er, and why you shouldn't necessarily try to duplicate your 26er position on top of the wheels. 29ers feel very stable due to that lower COG in relation to axle height.

    My FSR has a seat height of 41.5", SO is 28", my KM has a seat height of 40.5", SO of 32". They have identical tires, Ignitors up front and Ardent 2.25 in back.
    Last edited by bsieb; 07-17-2010 at 09:22 AM.
    I ride with the best dogs.




  37. #37
    Come see me after class
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    Quote Originally Posted by muzzanic
    I'm with you on that,I brought my bike to ride not stand over & pose for pictures.

    but how else would you show off your newly shaved legs and spandex?

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by raekism View Post
    I am built the same exact way and agree 100% what you say. I have ZERO stand over clearance of my GF but its never been an issue.
    This is like saying I am a good driver and I never had an accident so why do I need insurance? That 1"-3" of space is your insurance. Sure you could go your whole life without standover clearance without any accidents but it's there for a reason. Granted I totally get the idea of not basing your purchase around it. Also I don't think you need that golden rule of 2"+, any clearance whether it be .5" to 1" is better than nothing. For people like myself who are 5'5" and have short legs (29" standover) even getting something with a third on an inch is better than your boys pressed up against the bar

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by pureslop View Post
    Big stand over clearance is only desirable by those who have good bike handling skills (or those who aspire...). Its more than just the risk of nut crunching. A lower top tube allows a lower seat which is useful for bunny hops, manuals, hopping over logs, ledges, anything that requires a lot of body english. Being able to drop the seat down to or below the top of the rear tire is best. Also, for side-to-side ballance, it is useful to be able to move the knees freely without hitting the top tube when your feet are in the 3 and 9 position. When I borrow a bike with a high top tube I hit my knees on it while riding a wheelie or even just doing a track stand while setting up for a technical move. If you ride a bike with extra high stand over for long enough to acquire some new skills, then there is no going back. And this is coming from someone with some pretty average skills, but with some really fun newly acquired skills.

    "V" style frames are one of the best designs for stand over, but I suppose they have some disadvantages.

    I can understand someone coming from a roadie background not minding a high top tube (I am an X roadie). And I can see it not being a problem for cruising on easy trails. But does anyone actually prefer a high top tube? Is there any benefit? Do manufacturers just not want their bikes to look like the old "girls" bikes?
    My road bike provides me .3" inches of clearance and I am fine with that but on bumpy trails that aint going to fly. My 29er has 2.27" of clearance, I am not saying you need that, heck even 1" goes a long way. But yeah I think you hit on a point, I think there is a huge machismo factor in biking, no one wants to be seen on what others might consider a girls or kids bike even if it fits them properly. And no metal pressed up against the berries never feels great

  40. #40
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    Holy ancient thread!

  41. #41
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    Wow, times have changed since this thread went to sleep for 8 years

    When this thread happened back in 2010, I was still riding mostly Large bikes and usually had little or no stand-over.

    Since then, top tubes have gotten so long that I am riding small and medium bikes, and have plenty of standover.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  42. #42
    jcd's best friend
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    You think someone from 2010 will respond? The dude originally joined the forum in 2008 lol!
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