Solid fork 29ers- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Atl
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    Solid fork 29ers

    Why do so many 29er bikes have solid forks? Suspension shocks are cheap enough for sure...all 26" mountain bikes have them. I am building a a bike based on an SE Stout frame. It has a solid fork with it. Should I build it on up and ride it, or should I wait until I have a good suspension fork? What gives here? Note that while I am building a 29er I have never ridden one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atl
    Why do so many 29er bikes have solid forks? Suspension shocks are cheap enough for sure...all 26" mountain bikes have them. I am building a a bike based on an SE Stout frame. It has a solid fork with it. Should I build it on up and ride it, or should I wait until I have a good suspension fork? What gives here? Note that while I am building a 29er I have never ridden one.
    The price structure and variety of choices (less choices) is different for 29ers at this time. Hopefully we'll have more choices and lower prices as time goes on. No doubt we will! 29ers are bound to become more popular!
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  3. #3
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    Depends on what you intend on riding with it mostly. My GT peace is fine for most XC with a rigid fork, only miss the suspension in rocky stuff. I would build the Stout up rigid first, just to try it. There are issues on the 29ers with adding susser forks, not a slam dunk like on a 26", see the GT thread.

  4. #4
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    any pricing differences or incompatibilities can be worked around if you want a suspension fork. The biggest reason for the prevalence of rigid forks is that many people enjoy them and want to ride them

  5. #5
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    A 29'er somehow doesn't need a suspension fork as much as a 26" mtb does (for xc that is).
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  6. #6
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    Surely there are people riding rigid 26 it seems that most of those who are so inclined as to ride rigid are those who have made the jump to 29.

    And of course the bigger wheel doesn't hurt.
    Singin' I love hike a bike!!!

  7. #7
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atl
    Why do so many 29er bikes have solid forks? Suspension shocks are cheap enough for sure...all 26" mountain bikes have them. I am building a a bike based on an SE Stout frame. It has a solid fork with it. Should I build it on up and ride it, or should I wait until I have a good suspension fork? What gives here? Note that while I am building a 29er I have never ridden one.
    I prefer tubular forks. A solid fork would be very heavy and ride poorly.
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  8. #8
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    ohhhhhh tubular! I had no idea what the guy was talking about, thanks!

  9. #9
    Atl
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    I was actually referring to static tubular forks, just my terminology was wrong. I don't even think actual solid metal forks are used at all.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atl
    I was actually referring to static tubular forks, just my terminology was wrong. I don't even think actual solid metal forks are used at all.
    fyi, the normal term is a "rigid fork"

  11. #11
    Atl
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    I am a newbie, but a book written in the 90s I read recently was referring to rigid as solid forks...thats where I got it.

  12. #12
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    A good suspension fork ain't cheap or light. I like the simplicity of my rigid carbon fork. I've thought about putting on a suspension fork but I don't want to lay out the cash or add any weight. Besides the reason I got my SS 29er was that I wanted a different riding experience from my FS bike.
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  13. #13
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    In my case it's simple. I don't gain enough extra speed on the downhills to compensate for the time lost in the climbs with the extra weight of suspension forks. I simply use fatter tyres than I do on my 26" bike.
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  14. #14
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    A good carbon fork is not cheap but I do get the simplicity thing.

    And the weight is a major factor I am sure.

    I think it takes a certain type of rider to want to ride a rigid SS think masochistic maybe even a little Machismo.

    Atl I knew what you meant I didn't think you meant the the fork was fully solid but full rigid is the common term. As apposed to full suspension as apposed to hard tail which usually means front suspension only.
    Singin' I love hike a bike!!!

  15. #15
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    Lighter weight, more simply to do maintainance, better looks, and there always is someone asking how many cm of travel it has :-))
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    Turkish:Protection from what . . . zee Germans?
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  16. #16
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    A suspended 29" hardtail

    is considerably easier on my RA infested joints, particularly wrists, elbows and shoulders.
    I think it depends on how you ride, where you ride, and what you have to work with as much as any other factor.
    Me ... I like suspension forks, Prednisone and Enbrel, though I'd happily give up all three if I could.
    Craig, Durango CO
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  17. #17
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    atl based on ur old bike I would ride it rigid. That's how I ride my stout and it's great.

    And type of trails u ride will become amazingly easy on the 29 so enjoy it and save money
    Last edited by ricot83; 02-07-2010 at 08:58 AM.
    SS Rigid =
    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    There is no distraction. You only hear the sound of your breath and the crunch of the wheels across the dirt.

  18. #18
    mnt bike laws of physics
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    I have a couple of friends that ride singlespeeds and I asked them why they don't just go all out and use a rigid fork. Their reply was "there's a limit to the maddness."
    One said he tried it but after about 15 minutes he decided it was not even worth it. Downhills are very sketchy with the terrain we ride and it just plains hurts the body too much.
    For me, speed is a big part of mountain biking and anything that would slow me down is not worth it - I love to carve. I use my suspension fork almost as much on the climbs as the downs. Try going fast and you will see what I mean. I've never seen a person race without front suspension...well at least someone who was competitive.
    If you like taking your time, slowly picking lines and not thinking about maintanence at all, then going fully rigid may be for you. It surely will make you a better rider in the end and what doesn't kill you will make you stronger.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogiprophet
    I have a couple of friends that ride singlespeeds and I asked them why they don't just go all out and use a rigid fork. Their reply was "there's a limit to the maddness."
    One said he tried it but after about 15 minutes he decided it was not even worth it. Downhills are very sketchy with the terrain we ride and it just plains hurts the body too much.
    For me, speed is a big part of mountain biking and anything that would slow me down is not worth it - I love to carve. I use my suspension fork almost as much on the climbs as the downs. Try going fast and you will see what I mean. I've never seen a person race without front suspension...well at least someone who was competitive.
    If you like taking your time, slowly picking lines and not thinking about maintanence at all, then going fully rigid may be for you. It surely will make you a better rider in the end and what doesn't kill you will make you stronger.
    the first time on rigid on rough terrain always sucks even for good riders. Just like SS, it is difficult at first, hurts in ways you haven't been hurt before and most importantly uses different muscles and techniques that take time to build up and learn. I ride on very rocky terrain and I love my rigid fork. Yes I am slower, but really it is only a marginal difference on rocky trails now that I know what I'm doing. I love making the most of a susp fork too, but I really enjoy rigid

    I have seem some very competitive people on rigid bikes btw

  20. #20
    mnt bike laws of physics
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    i know what you mean. This is the first year for me on a hardtail and it is fun on the smoother trails, but it is kicking my butt (literally) on anything rocky. I am noticably slower through the rocks whereas people who have always rode them are smooth so it would seem. However, like you said about rigid forks, I am getting used to not having rear suspension and am better already...although I don't know if I will ever be faster...it is different and that is what a lot of people are after especially after riding as long as we have. I tend to move enough that I don't have the same problem most people have about getting board with their local trails, so I don't think I will ever have to try a rigid fork or SS unless I decide to settle down one day.
    As far as being competitive, I'm sure there are plenty of pros out there that if they rode a rigid bike would still kick my a$$.

  21. #21
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    You re-learn how to ride when you move from ss or rigid or fs or ht. Each rides differently so u must change according to it's ride
    SS Rigid =
    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    There is no distraction. You only hear the sound of your breath and the crunch of the wheels across the dirt.

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