Seeking a Lightweight XC Bike- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Seeking a Lightweight XC Bike

    I'm 48 years old and making a comeback to cycling. I don't race (though I'm in the lottery for the Leadville 100). I used to ride a lot of road and mountain bike for many, many years - mostly front range Colorado stuff. I'm not much of a downhiller, but I was a good climber before I crashed and broke my hip 8 years ago. I then gained 120 lbs. and stopped exercising. I've now lost 90 lbs. of that weight. I'm currently 6' tall and 170 lbs. My goal is 145 - 150 lbs. Currently I only have a road bike. I want a mountain bike - probably full-suspension, especially considering my age.

    I like lightweight bikes; they're nimble and quick. At first I was turned off by 29ers because they were heavier than comparable 26ers. However, I'm more and more convinced that, though heavier, 29ers are overall faster than 26ers, even uphill.

    I'm not in any hurry to buy a bike. I want to test ride a lot of them. Which bikes should I consider? My arbitrary max weight for a 26er is 25 lbs. Is this comparable to 26 lbs. in a 29er? Again, this is arbitrary. I just don't want to crank a heavyweight slug uphill. I spend most of my time cranking up hills. Even with my relative slow downhill speed, my downhills are short compared to the time I spend climbing.

    Thanks for your assistance.

    Michael

  2. #2
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    Bext XC full suspension 26" race bikes if you can afford them - Cannondale Scalpel, Giant Anthem X Sl, Santa Cruz Blur, Yeti something. I forget the name. Someone else will name it.

    Best 29er hardtails - Cannondale Flash, Carbon Niner, custom Ti with Lefty fork.

    Best full suspension 29ers - No idea but I'm sure Niner makes something wicked.

    p.s. Congrats on the weight loss and welcome back to keeping fit.

  3. #3
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    i have a s works 29 ht that I love, i would also consider specialized too. My bike was 21.3 out of the box. My have a full suspension 26" and a hardtail 29. They are very similar.

  4. #4
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    Fisher Superfly 100

  5. #5
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    The Superfly 100 looks nice but don't believe the published weight of ~22-23lbs for real riding (skinny tyres) The Superfly is realistically ~25 lbs which is great for a FS 29er. The Santa Cruz Tallboy is also an option worth looking into and respectible @ ~25.8 lbs.

    You're timing is good (as is patience) because everyone is rushing into the 29er market now & with all the competition, prices will be forced down & technology will only improve.

    Are you wanting to build up a frame or buy something as-is? The reason I ask is that the real weight is all your parts & if you build it up you can ensure that you keep the weight down on the moving (esp. rotational) bits & pieces. Welcome back

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by worthy_4242
    i have a s works 29 ht that I love, i would also consider specialized too. My bike was 21.3 out of the box. My have a full suspension 26" and a hardtail 29. They are very similar.
    To be clear, are you saying that your two bikes---26er full suspension and 29er hardtail---ride very similar? Just curious---I am new to the 29er camp and am in the market for one myself.

  7. #7
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    Budget?

  8. #8
    CB2
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    26 lbs? Shoot that's too easy.
    Here's my Karate Monkey set up as a 1x8 weighing 25.7 lbs (I got it down to 25.2 running Kenda Karmas front and rear).
    Pretty basic build too; LX hubs laced to Sun EQ21 rims, Avid Juicy 5 brakes, Ritchey stem and post, Salsa carbon bar, CB eggbeater SL pedals.
    If you were to get an alloy, or carbon fiber frame you could be in the 23 lbs range pretty easily.
    Last edited by CB2; 02-03-2010 at 06:04 AM.

  9. #9
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    For a light full sus 29er there aren't really allot of choices right now, but you're living in the hotbed. Check out some of your neighbors:
    Lenz Works Leviathan available in 3"&4" versions
    Dean Titanium
    Moots

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wacomme
    I'm 48 years old and making a comeback to cycling. I don't race (though I'm in the lottery for the Leadville 100). I used to ride a lot of road and mountain bike for many, many years - mostly front range Colorado stuff. I'm not much of a downhiller, but I was a good climber before I crashed and broke my hip 8 years ago. I then gained 120 lbs. and stopped exercising. I've now lost 90 lbs. of that weight. I'm currently 6' tall and 170 lbs. My goal is 145 - 150 lbs. Currently I only have a road bike. I want a mountain bike - probably full-suspension, especially considering my age.

    I like lightweight bikes; they're nimble and quick. At first I was turned off by 29ers because they were heavier than comparable 26ers. However, I'm more and more convinced that, though heavier, 29ers are overall faster than 26ers, even uphill.

    I'm not in any hurry to buy a bike. I want to test ride a lot of them. Which bikes should I consider? My arbitrary max weight for a 26er is 25 lbs. Is this comparable to 26 lbs. in a 29er? Again, this is arbitrary. I just don't want to crank a heavyweight slug uphill. I spend most of my time cranking up hills. Even with my relative slow downhill speed, my downhills are short compared to the time I spend climbing.


    Michael
    Michael - I can relate to your age since I'm 48 and quest for a full suspension to be kind to our aging body. Kudos to you for the weight loss to date and additional goal. At your height, I am assuming you will end up on either a medium or a large frame which means getting the weight of a full suspension 29"er to come in around the 24-26 pound range won't be a problem. Of course it will cost some coin, but there are some light weight 3" and 4" travel frames available. You can build them to be race bikes, or you can build them to be XC trail bikes. Weight weenie them out, or bulk up with heavier wheels and components. It's your choice.

    Lenz Leviathan in 3" or 4", Niner JET 9, Specialized Epic Marathon 29, etc... . Full suspension entire bikes that are lightweight and available for purchase include the Gary Fisher Superfly 100, Gary Fisher HiFi Pro, Specialized Epic Marathon 29, or Wrench Science will configure and build any of the Niner bikes for you. You can play around the frame sizes and component packages to see the overall weight at Wrench Science. Of course, building it yourself can skip the "group component" method of building and you can select on your own various parts, wheels, tires to come in at an even lower weight. Dig through some of the threads on this forum for those who have built up some of these various frames to see what components they hung on their bikes and what weight they achieved. As an example, I had a size XL JET 9 that weighed 25 pounds (and my newly re-designed one will weigh even less due to me chaing some components for the new build), a 4" Sugar 293 (size XL) that weighs 25 pounds, a size XL RIP 9 that weighs 26 and change with XC tires and 27 and change with bigger meat tires on it. So I am pretty confident that riding a medium or large size frame, the weight could easily be in the 24-25 pound sweet spot - if not less depending on what you buy and what you hang on it. The more you spend, the lighter it'll get. ;-]

    If you want something more stout for an all around full suspension, yet still XC oriented - you might consider gaining a pound or more in frame weight and still do a light build to keep things down in weight with a frame such as the Niner RIP 9, Salsa Big Mama, Ventana El Rey, and many others in the 4" - 4"+ category. From the bikes I own, if I was going with one bike only to own and ride for mountain biking - I'd take the RIP 9. It can be built leaning to the XC side or to the heavier side for more log bashing, rock pounding, jump oriented side with stout wheels, tires and components. It's very kind to a 48 year old body and well worth the extra weight and extra travel of 120mm up front and in the rear (my frame is 1.49 pounds heavier than my lighter and shorter travel full suspension frames). The Wrench Science build using SRAM XX puts a medium RIP at 26.43 pounds and using an XTR component group at 26.71 pounds. Not bad for a stout frame that will take plenty of abuse. You'd be at 25.62 with the SRAM XX and 25.9 with the XTR on the Niner JET 9 with a medium frame and the Wrench Science build. So not much weight gain for the additional travel and stoutness of the RIP frame over the JET. The Superfly 100 with larger volume tires than what it comes with be around the JET's weight as well.

    BB

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown
    Michael - I can relate to your age since I'm 48 and quest for a full suspension to be kind to our aging body. Kudos to you for the weight loss to date and additional goal. At your height, I am assuming you will end up on either a medium or a large frame which means getting the weight of a full suspension 29"er to come in around the 24-26 pound range won't be a problem. Of course it will cost some coin, but there are some light weight 3" and 4" travel frames available. You can build them to be race bikes, or you can build them to be XC trail bikes. Weight weenie them out, or bulk up with heavier wheels and components. It's your choice.

    Lenz Leviathan in 3" or 4", Niner JET 9, Specialized Epic Marathon 29, etc... . Full suspension entire bikes that are lightweight and available for purchase include the Gary Fisher Superfly 100, Gary Fisher HiFi Pro, Specialized Epic Marathon 29, or Wrench Science will configure and build any of the Niner bikes for you. You can play around the frame sizes and component packages to see the overall weight at Wrench Science. Of course, building it yourself can skip the "group component" method of building and you can select on your own various parts, wheels, tires to come in at an even lower weight. Dig through some of the threads on this forum for those who have built up some of these various frames to see what components they hung on their bikes and what weight they achieved. As an example, I had a size XL JET 9 that weighed 25 pounds (and my newly re-designed one will weigh even less due to me chaing some components for the new build), a 4" Sugar 293 (size XL) that weighs 25 pounds, a size XL RIP 9 that weighs 26 and change with XC tires and 27 and change with bigger meat tires on it. So I am pretty confident that riding a medium or large size frame, the weight could easily be in the 24-25 pound sweet spot - if not less depending on what you buy and what you hang on it. The more you spend, the lighter it'll get. ;-]

    If you want something more stout for an all around full suspension, yet still XC oriented - you might consider gaining a pound or more in frame weight and still do a light build to keep things down in weight with a frame such as the Niner RIP 9, Salsa Big Mama, Ventana El Rey, and many others in the 4" - 4"+ category. From the bikes I own, if I was going with one bike only to own and ride for mountain biking - I'd take the RIP 9. It can be built leaning to the XC side or to the heavier side for more log bashing, rock pounding, jump oriented side with stout wheels, tires and components. It's very kind to a 48 year old body and well worth the extra weight and extra travel of 120mm up front and in the rear (my frame is 1.49 pounds heavier than my lighter and shorter travel full suspension frames). The Wrench Science build using SRAM XX puts a medium RIP at 26.43 pounds and using an XTR component group at 26.71 pounds. Not bad for a stout frame that will take plenty of abuse. You'd be at 25.62 with the SRAM XX and 25.9 with the XTR on the Niner JET 9 with a medium frame and the Wrench Science build. So not much weight gain for the additional travel and stoutness of the RIP frame over the JET. The Superfly 100 with larger volume tires than what it comes with be around the JET's weight as well.

    BB
    that's it, I cannot take it anymore. You are now officially on my "ignore" list as you are an embarassment to what internet forums are supposed to be used for

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown
    Wrench Science build using SRAM XX puts a medium RIP at 26.43 pounds and using an XTR component group at 26.71 pounds. Not bad for a stout frame that will take plenty of abuse. You'd be at 25.62 with the SRAM XX and 25.9 with the XTR on the Niner JET 9 with a medium frame and the Wrench Science build. So not much weight gain for the additional travel and stoutness of the RIP frame over the JET. The Superfly 100 with larger volume tires than what it comes with be around the JET's weight as well.

    BB
    If you have the cash to hang XX don't waste it on a Jet. Sorry Niner boys, but why suggest the revision of a problem frame that is itself unproven, untested, and largely unseen?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bondseye
    If you have the cash to hang XX don't waste it on a Jet. Sorry Niner boys, but why suggest the revision of a problem frame that is itself unproven, untested, and largely unseen?
    True. Going with that theme, we should not recommend the Superfly 100, the Specialized Epic Marathon 29, the newly designed 2010 HiFi, etc... . These are virtually untested products and don't have enough miles or owners yet to give a true picture of their longevity out on the trail. Maybe after a full season of riding or so has been done by a bunch of folks out there day in and out to see how they hold up and if any issues emerge would be more appropriate.

    If that's the case, we should go back to the Lenz Leviathan as really the only tested and proven light weight full suspension bike frame for the OP to seriously look at for his needs at this moment. I don't think the Titus is what he's after, so the Lenz would be it - or an older model year HiFi for lightweight frames still available at discounts if an LBS has his size in stock. If he is willing to wait a season to see how everything shakes out with the newer light weight products from various bike companies, then looking for something to ride in the 2011 season might be the appropriate course of action.

    Bondseye - what would your suggestion be for the OP?

    BB

  14. #14
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    wacomme,
    have you ridden a carbon bike? for the type of riding you speak of, a hardtail bike thats carbon should be plush enough so maybe your back will be alright.

    its a pretty big payoff if you can get a hardtail as you will shave a couple lbs and seeing as you want to climb and do leadville, i am sure you want to shed as much weight as possible.

    gary fisher and niner both have carbon hardtails and so does specialized. but the specialized bike is slacker than the other 2 so they ride differently. i would suggest trying both of them before you buy either of them.

    spechy advertises that their carbon HT stumpy comes in a 21.5 lbs..if thats true, it would be on the top of my list.

    other than that, GF is the lightest FS 29er i know about.

    or if you want a softail check out siren

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    Thank you for your suggestions. This will give me a place to start finding bikes to test ride.

    Perhaps it's due to the 29er forum, but it appears that the people here agree that a 29er is better for my needs than a 26er. For XC country use in Colorado mountains, with preference to overall speed and efficiency, a 29er is preferable to a 26er. Correct?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown
    True. Going with that theme, we should not recommend the Superfly 100, the Specialized Epic Marathon 29, the newly designed 2010 HiFi, etc... . These are virtually untested products and don't have enough miles or owners yet to give a true picture of their longevity out on the trail. Maybe after a full season of riding or so has been done by a bunch of folks out there day in and out to see how they hold up and if any issues emerge would be more appropriate.

    Bondseye - what would your suggestion be for the OP?

    BB
    Everything you listed has been tested, and reviewed. The Jet has a bad track record, and thus far is only in the hands of Niner employees.

    I already made suggestions, look above.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by wacomme

    Perhaps it's due to the 29er forum, but it appears that the people here agree that a 29er is better for my needs than a 26er. For XC country use in Colorado mountains, with preference to overall speed and efficiency, a 29er is preferable to a 26er. Correct?

    These are wants, not needs. You don't NEED 29" wheels just like you don't NEED 26" wheels.



    Only you can decide what is good for you and you should really test ride some bikes, 26" FS, 26" hardtail, 29" FS, and 29" hardtail before you make your decision. I'll even throw out 650b, but you are not likely to find a local test ride in a shop. I personally can't get use to the squish of full suspension for racing. Great for relaxing though over rough terrain. Maybe try a softail too.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by wacomme
    Thank you for your suggestions. This will give me a place to start finding bikes to test ride.

    Perhaps it's due to the 29er forum, but it appears that the people here agree that a 29er is better for my needs than a 26er. For XC country use in Colorado mountains, with preference to overall speed and efficiency, a 29er is preferable to a 26er. Correct?
    There's absolutely no consensus on this matter. The best thinking is that the taller you are, the more beneficial 29" wheels become. That said, there are more opinions about this subject than asses in this forum, errrr allot.

  19. #19
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    Since you're in Colorado, check out the Golden Bike Shop. They have a fantastic demo program - $100 gets you 5 bikes to ride for a day each. The days can be spread out over time, too. The $100 also applies to a purchase, so if you buy a bike it really costs nothing.
    More importantly, they have a great selection, including:
    Lenz Levitahn 4" travel
    Niner RIP 9
    Ellsworth Evolve
    Intense Tracer
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
    Salsa Big Mama
    Spot Longboard - geared and SS

    * Niner Air 9 carbon!!!!! (I rode this one last night. I'll post a new thread about this one.)

    Oh yeah, and 26" bikes too just in case.

    Truly, take the bikes out on longer rides and have fun.
    Is this where I write something witty?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88 rex
    These are wants, not needs. You don't NEED 29" wheels just like you don't NEED 26" wheels.



    Only you can decide what is good for you and you should really test ride some bikes, 26" FS, 26" hardtail, 29" FS, and 29" hardtail before you make your decision. I'll even throw out 650b, but you are not likely to find a local test ride in a shop. I personally can't get use to the squish of full suspension for racing. Great for relaxing though over rough terrain. Maybe try a softail too.
    Yes. It's all a want, not a need. It's fortunate that I can consider a want in addition to needs.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by djlee
    Since you're in Colorado, check out the Golden Bike Shop. They have a fantastic demo program - $100 gets you 5 bikes to ride for a day each. The days can be spread out over time, too. The $100 also applies to a purchase, so if you buy a bike it really costs nothing.
    More importantly, they have a great selection, including:
    Lenz Levitahn 4" travel
    Niner RIP 9
    Ellsworth Evolve
    Intense Tracer
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
    Salsa Big Mama
    Spot Longboard - geared and SS

    * Niner Air 9 carbon!!!!! (I rode this one last night. I'll post a new thread about this one.)

    Oh yeah, and 26" bikes too just in case.

    Truly, take the bikes out on longer rides and have fun.
    Thanks for this suggestion. I'll look into their demo program.

    I'm in no hurry to buy a mountain bike. I want to demo a lot of bike before I even make a purchase. It's just that I read about this bike and that bike, and then realize it's a downhill bike or something I don't even want to consider - -thus the reason for the thread. I want to narrow the field to some appropriate bikes for my wants and desires as a cyclist.

    BTW - the last mountain bike I owned as a ProFlex.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bondseye
    For a light full sus 29er there aren't really allot of choices right now, but you're living in the hotbed. Check out some of your neighbors:
    Lenz Works Leviathan available in 3"&4" versions
    Dean Titanium
    Moots
    What? The guy wants to ease himself back into mountain biking after nearly a decade and you throw out a Dean ($2750+) and a Moots ($3435 for the frame alone) at him? Nice way to enter back into mountain biking.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bondseye
    There's absolutely no consensus on this matter. The best thinking is that the taller you are, the more beneficial 29" wheels become. That said, there are more opinions about this subject than asses in this forum, errrr allot.
    Then perhaps I should be checking out both 29ers and 26ers.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by wacomme
    Then perhaps I should be checking out both 29ers and 26ers.
    You say you have time. If that's the case ride everything you can, then decide for yourself.
    I like to hit bike festivals. They usually have free demos on sight.

  25. #25
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    SC Tallboy, Superfly100 or the Epic would be my choices.
    Turner is more a trail bike now that it is out to 5".
    Same with the Rip.
    Does the Tracer actually exist yet in 29??
    Even if it does, at 6" travel it is not a race bike.

  26. #26
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    I'll have to agree that you have the cream of the crop in your neighborhood. Try out a Lenz Leviathan and a Moots Mooto-X YBB (if you can find a demo). Either of these bikes will work perfectly for general XC riding and longer endurance-type racing, will last you a lifetime, and offer direct support within driving distance.
    "I'll disintegrate over time if I expect my body to try to keep up with my mind" -BM

    Race, Rocks or Road...Just Ride

  27. #27
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    wacomme,

    Congratulations on your return to biking. I have a similar situation @ 43 with a 10 year old prosthetic hip. I plumped up nice, 265 (5' 11)! 2 years ago I dug my '93 Trek 7900 & '95Proflex 755 out of their 8 year hibernations and haven't looked back. I dropped 30 lbs so far, doing 85 miles a week on avg. I like alternating btwn the 700c 7900 and 26'r, I'm eyeing up Salsa Dos Niner..Not a true FS, but enough cush.. Light too.

  28. #28
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    These

    These are good choices, available, and can be built to, or below 27 lbs w/o breaking the bank:

    Pivot 429
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
    Titus RX 29 - out of production [unfortunately]
    Specialized Epic
    Lenz Leviathan
    GF Superfly 100

    A tip - spend freely on good wheels, and the rest is a matter of taste.

    Congrats on returning to the fold. Enjoy your new bike.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flatulina
    wacomme,

    Congratulations on your return to biking. I have a similar situation @ 43 with a 10 year old prosthetic hip. I plumped up nice, 265 (5' 11)! 2 years ago I dug my '93 Trek 7900 & '95Proflex 755 out of their 8 year hibernations and haven't looked back. I dropped 30 lbs so far, doing 85 miles a week on avg. I like alternating btwn the 700c 7900 and 26'r, I'm eyeing up Salsa Dos Niner..Not a true FS, but enough cush.. Light too.
    It's nice to see someone else in a similar situation as me. Congratulations on the weight loss. Keep it going and happy riding!!!

    BTW - I had a Proflex 855. Unfortunately, I sold it. However, I kept hold of my road bike. Thank God!

  30. #30
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    650b

    Someone was going to say it.

  31. #31
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    Motobecane Fly or Fantom titanium in either 26" or 29" - from bikesdirect.com - like this one that I ride and perfectly happy with. Titanium is the material to get for hardtails IMHO.

    I am still shopping for a FS 29r for longer riding. Can not decide. Kona Hei Hei 29 looks interesting. Or maybe splurge on a custom with Ventana rear..

  32. #32
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    I'm 50+ and been MTb riding for 15+ years and 29er's are the way to go unless you want a bike you can flick and trick.

    I've tried full suspension and it's great for jumping off things but most of the riding I do is with the wheels on the ground so a hardtail with front forks suffices. A hardtail with the bigger wheels running tubeless tyres at say 27psi absords most of the shock.

    Now I've got 4 29er's one each made of Ti, Scandium, Steel and Alu - and that is the order I would rate them.

    The Ti (Lynskey Pro 29) weights sub 10kg and is my 100k event race bike - you can ride it all day it just floats over the trails
    The Scandium (On-One Scandal) is my training and fun bike and gets ridden the most - probably sub 11kg and super responsive.
    The Steel (Surly Karate Monkey) is my commuter bike and
    The Alu (Jamis Dakota) is for my wife.

    Now all these are SS (I love the simplicity and quietness of the ride) and I went SS to build up strength and endurance because I found I was getting lazy with gears - every time I came to a hill it would be click click click to an easy gear and grind.

    Now I will never go back to gears and the improvement in race times has been phenomonal.

    So my opinion would be;
    29'er = Tick
    Hardtail = Tick
    Frame Material = The best you can afford
    Low tyre pressure (via running big bag tyres or tubeless) = Tick
    Gears = optional 1x9 is a good mid-way point

    Have fun spending your money on a ride and remember "Goods things ain't cheap and cheap things ain't good"
    Go Big or Go Home

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by More nuts than gears
    I'm 50+ and been MTb riding for 15+ years and 29er's are the way to go unless you want a bike you can flick and trick.

    I've tried full suspension and it's great for jumping off things but most of the riding I do is with the wheels on the ground so a hardtail with front forks suffices. A hardtail with the bigger wheels running tubeless tyres at say 27psi absords most of the shock.

    Now I've got 4 29er's one each made of Ti, Scandium, Steel and Alu - and that is the order I would rate them.

    The Ti (Lynskey Pro 29) weights sub 10kg and is my 100k event race bike - you can ride it all day it just floats over the trails
    The Scandium (On-One Scandal) is my training and fun bike and gets ridden the most - probably sub 11kg and super responsive.
    The Steel (Surly Karate Monkey) is my commuter bike and
    The Alu (Jamis Dakota) is for my wife.

    Now all these are SS (I love the simplicity and quietness of the ride) and I went SS to build up strength and endurance because I found I was getting lazy with gears - every time I came to a hill it would be click click click to an easy gear and grind.

    Now I will never go back to gears and the improvement in race times has been phenomonal.

    So my opinion would be;
    29'er = Tick
    Hardtail = Tick
    Frame Material = The best you can afford
    Low tyre pressure (via running big bag tyres or tubeless) = Tick
    Gears = optional 1x9 is a good mid-way point

    Have fun spending your money on a ride and remember "Goods things ain't cheap and cheap things ain't good"
    Thanks for this info. A hardtail may not be a bad option. It's at least worth considering.

    While I, too, would like the simplicity of a single speed, I just don't see it being practical. My backyard is the Colorado Front Range, and in the summer I like to venture onto Colorado mountain trails; some can be quite steep. Maybe if I lived in the flatlands, but where I live gears seem to be a necessity? Then again, I haven't ridden single speeds.

  34. #34
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  35. #35
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    I just recently moved to Indiana from Denver and went through this debate while I was living in Colorado. I opted for a full-suspension 26" while I was out there and then I purchased a carbon HT 29er when I found out I was moving to the midwest. I think it depends more on your particular joys of riding. I think either type could be "perfect" for you, it just depends. Do you enjoy being able to climb Mt. Falcon as fast as possible, or do you want to descend Enchanted Forest with a huge smile on your face, or do you want something that will be the best compromise for both?

    Go to your LBS and ask all kinds of questions like the above of yourself and then ask more questions at the shop. If you don't have a favorite shop check out Adventure Cycling on the east side of cherry creek park, they are phenomenal, ask for Dennis. He'll be able to help you figure out what bike is going to be the best for you, plus they have a demo program and the best mechanic in town.
    Our Stable: Yeti ASR-5, Salsa Mukluk , Cleary Meerkat 24", Spec. Hotrock 20"

  36. #36
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    Why hasn't anyone recommended the Titus Rockstar in Ti? Maybe they have and I missed it. I'll bet it could make a lightweight 29er. Ti front triangle and carbon rear.

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