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  1. #1
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    Ripmo Vs. '19 Stumpjumper

    Hello all,
    I am about to replace my '13 Stumpjumper Comp carbon with a new toy. So far I demoed the '19 Stumpy Comp carbon, Hightower CC, Ripley LS3, Ripmo X01, and Yeti SB130. There were all great bikes with different personalities.
    The Stumpjumper was very impressive, even in Comp level, in spite being fairly heavy.
    But having already owned three Stumpys, I would like to try something new, and I have to say i really like the DW link suspension.
    While I like the Santa Cruz and the VPP for climbs, I found the bike a little nervous on descents, and not quite as confident as the others.
    The Yeti was stellar, and perhaps my favorite, but the heavy base model puts the higher builds (since I didn't win the lottery ) above my budget.
    I initially had my heart setup on the Ripley. Loved it. Until I tried the Ripmo, which is fantastic, and for the variety of rides I do, a more versatile bike.

    I Live in So Cal, where the trails are mostly dry, with rocky and loose terrain, with a wide range of technical levels. Climbing ability there is a must.
    For my budget, a GX build Ripmo with carbon wheels upgrade is at the top of my list, but for a similar price the Stumpjumper Expert 29 is a very interesting proposition. Such a great deal.

    Both bikes being quite similar, with comparable suspension travel, can anyone who has/do own both, or tried them both, chime in to help me decide between these two? I know, first world problem.


    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    I currently own both, a highly modded alloy Ď19 Stumpy and a mildly modded Ripmo GX, both in XL. I can probably help with any specific questions.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  3. #3
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    These are both bikes I'm looking into also.

    One thing I'm curious about is how the bikes react when pedaling hard out of the saddle during quick sprints or punchy climbs. In a race, it's unlikely you want to be fiddling with the climb switch.

    Second thing I'm wondering about is agility in the tight stuff. Many reviews state that the Ripmo rides smaller and is still fun on XC type or rolling terrain but it sure seems like a long bike to throw around. Stumpjumper seems to be a bit shorter and steeper.

  4. #4
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    I've demo'd several of these bikes and also ride in So. CA. I'm not sure I would use any of these bikes in an XC race, but maybe yagr68 is talking about something else like enduro? The Ripmo felt like too much bike for me and a bit sluggish, but that might be because of the bigger wheels and the fact that I was riding in less than ideal conditions. I know lots of people love that bike. I ended up going with Hightower LT. OP stated that the Hightower felt a bit nervous on descents, but I suggest taking out the HTLT and seeing how you feel. OP may ride above my pay grade, but I've taken the LT on everything local as well as the bike parks at Summit and Santa's Village and never felt like I needed more bike. Also, it's a strong climber which is a must where we live and ride.

  5. #5
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    If you liked the Stumpy, you certainly should try the 2018/2019 Rocky Mountain Instinct. Its a better version of the Stumpy and its lighter too. Length is about the same, slightly shorter chainstays yet a significant amount of more reach and a steeper seat angle too. I like that rocky smashed all of that somewhat longer fit without massively increasing the wheelbase, which I'm not a fan of on these very capable 29ers.

  6. #6
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    I owned an Instinct, too. For big gnar riding in Phoenix, it was not in the Stumpy's league. The Ripmo is not a whole new level from the Stumpy, but I do slightly prefer the Ibis. The new Stumpjumper is a damn fine bike, though.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    I owned an Instinct, too. For big gnar riding in Phoenix, it was not in the Stumpy's league. The Ripmo is not a whole new level from the Stumpy, but I do slightly prefer the Ibis. The new Stumpjumper is a damn fine bike, though.
    Were you on the current Instinct that Jesse Malmead is racing? Or an older bike? He would have won Whistler EWS this year most likely like he did last year. Pretty sure it can handle the Gnar just fine. Maybe you were on a less capable bike. Regardless the geo is superior in reach and STA for sure while having the same wheelbase. Ripmo is a sick bike tho, it's too long in XL for me but I could live with that probably, especially if I was on a medium or large. There is a dang good reason Ibis, Yeti, Evil and Transition have all built a similar bike geo in a mid travel-ish 29er.

  8. #8
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    Yes, it was a 2018. And Iím not theorizing about the bikes mentioned, I owned and rode them on some of the more technical trails in the country.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  9. #9
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    Cool, well OP you can go wrong with stuff these days. Just see what fits.

  10. #10
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    All are great bikes! Get the one that makes you smile the most.

    At the X01 level you may want to consider a full custom build so you can pick each component that goes on it.
    Best Source for Ibis, Devinci, and Ventana!
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velorangutan View Post
    All are great bikes! Get the one that makes you smile the most.

    At the X01 level you may want to consider a full custom build so you can pick each component that goes on it.
    best bike ever made

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale-Calgary View Post
    best bike ever made
    I love mine too

  13. #13
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    Ripmo blows through travel like it doesnít have any...

  14. #14
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    Please, please continue posting on every Ripmo thread about your experience on one demo ride with not enough volume spacers in the shock.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Please, please continue posting on every Ripmo thread about your experience on one demo ride with not enough volume spacers in the shock.
    Volume spacers were maxed out.... Just posting my opinion no reason to get offended. Do you work for Ibis?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Ripmo blows through travel like it doesnít have any...
    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Please, please continue posting on every Ripmo thread about your experience on one demo ride with not enough volume spacers in the shock.
    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Volume spacers were maxed out.... Just posting my opinion no reason to get offended. Do you work for Ibis?
    Streetdoctors experiences are most valuable. It becomes very difficult to use forum posts about bike ride experiences when they are all brushed over with post bike buying honeymoon hormones.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Ripmo blows through travel like it doesnít have any...
    Mine doesn't. 200 lbs and I run 255 in it.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale-Calgary View Post
    Mine doesn't. 200 lbs and I run 255 in it.
    We all ride at a different pace, I'm only posting my experiences. 245psi with 2 volume spacers (max on 2018 X2) and HSC almost completely closed. This on a rough/rocky trail with zero drops. Can't really call it an enduro bike, it would get eaten alive in most bike parks.

    The bike might ride a lot better with a '19 X2 and more volume spacers/higher PSI but a frame design that relies that heavily on the shock is not ideal IMO.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    We all ride at a different pace, I'm only posting my experiences. 245psi with 2 volume spacers (max on 2018 X2) and HSC almost completely closed. This on a rough/rocky trail with zero drops. Can't really call it an enduro bike, it would get eaten alive in most bike parks.

    The bike might ride a lot better with a '19 X2 and more volume spacers/higher PSI but a frame design that relies that heavily on the shock is not ideal IMO.
    How heavy are you? If you have that much HSC your prob better off closing up some of the LSC. They work as a team and HSC isn't used as much if LSC is open too much. Are other people having same problem? Also if your fork isn't setup right, it can put extra hits on the rear. Like a dune buggy hitting whoops... If the front end is bottoming out... often it's the backend that is way to firm or packing down with too little rebound instead of just the fault of the design or front suspension. It's a bit complicated, tho I'm sure none of this if foreign to you.

    Fwiw Kendall-Weed loves his and is certainly riding a lot harder in Bellingham than most people at a park. Dude makes those gnarly wet trails look easy on that bike while riding on one wheel.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac48 View Post
    Streetdoctors experiences are most valuable. It becomes very difficult to use forum posts about bike ride experiences when they are all brushed over with post bike buying honeymoon hormones.
    its even harder taking one's experiences seriously when he's blabbering after one ride.
    but hey he is an expert racer

  21. #21
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    Right? The best is the first-ride Yeti 150 ďreview.Ē Best bike ever until two weeks later itís gone. For me, as someone who also goes through several bikes a year, it ainít a review if you havenít spent 3-4 weeks on the bike.

    He likes to tell everyone how fast he is. Heck, maybe itís true. But being fast doesnít necessarily mean you know anything about bikes.

    Still, I hope the dude can find a rig to contain all his awesome-sauce. Iím glad itís not an Ibis so maybe thatís one sub-forum thatíll be safe.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac48 View Post
    Streetdoctors experiences are most valuable. It becomes very difficult to use forum posts about bike ride experiences when they are all brushed over with post bike buying honeymoon hormones.
    It's like anything else, when tons of other people aren't having an issue and there that one whose opinion is 180 degrees out from most others- you have to wonder.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    Fwiw Kendall-Weed loves his and is certainly riding a lot harder in Bellingham than most people at a park. Dude makes those gnarly wet trails look easy on that bike while riding on one wheel.
    In his DPX2 setup video he shows the bike bottom out of a pretty small jump. He then adds volume spacers and never shows it not bottom out...

    ďThe little shock that could! DPX2 set up guide!Ē at 3:15.

    https://youtu.be/HRKlB5jjXDI

    I demoed the ripmo with stock DPX2 shock on a cross country/flow trail with a few smaller rocks and small 1-2í high jumps and used a lot of the travel. Canít say I bottomed it out but I was surpises how much I used.

    I am 160lbs and had the shock at 225psi let it was a little stiff and tried a little more sag at 215psi which felt good but a little over active and seems to move through travel quick.

    But it was a short 1 hour demo, nothing more.

    From the short demo my guess is the bike needs to be set up on the stiff side. All in all I liked it well enough to buy it as I donít ride that hard but I am still playing with the idea of the evil offering.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by odin View Post
    its even harder taking one's experiences seriously when he's blabbering after one ride.
    but hey he is an expert racer
    3 rides, but alright. A demo is $100/day around here. I race Enduro in "Expert Open" or Cat 1 and sometimes Pro. Call that what you want. I'm not here for a *&($ measuring contest, just trying to find a bike that suits my style.

    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    How heavy are you? If you have that much HSC your prob better off closing up some of the LSC. They work as a team and HSC isn't used as much if LSC is open too much. Are other people having same problem? Also if your fork isn't setup right, it can put extra hits on the rear. Like a dune buggy hitting whoops... If the front end is bottoming out... often it's the backend that is way to firm or packing down with too little rebound instead of just the fault of the design or front suspension. It's a bit complicated, tho I'm sure none of this if foreign to you.

    Fwiw Kendall-Weed loves his and is certainly riding a lot harder in Bellingham than most people at a park. Dude makes those gnarly wet trails look easy on that bike while riding on one wheel.
    I'm about 50lbs heavier than Kendall. 200lb in gear, 6'1. Suspension was set as good as it was going to get with an '18 X2. LSC was mid range, HSR was fast enough to make up for all the HSC. Definitely not packing up. Most likely the 2019 X2 is a lot better for a bike like this, but again I'm not a big fan of any bike that relies so heavily on the shock. FWIW I have a couple top 20's on the Strava at Bellingham and I've only ridden there a couple days on my way to Whistler. He's probably not a user though. He is fast.


    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    It's like anything else, when tons of other people aren't having an issue and there that one whose opinion is 180 degrees out from most others- you have to wonder.
    Why are all the EWS guys on Ripmo's riding DPX2's in your opinion? Maybe it has something to do with the regressive leverage rate and the DPX2's ability to run 350psi and larger volume spacers? Certainly the DPX2 isn't better than an X2 in Fox's eyes who designed the shock for downhill applications. Most people ride really slow.... The 2018 X2 was a real bad choice for this bike. It's still on the long list but it's moved way too the back. Still considering the Evil Offering, Rallon, and Foxy 29. The Foxy still has a falling progression rate much like the Ripmo so I'm hoping to demo with a DPX2. If the coil is the only option I'll probably pass.

    Video review coming soon

    If you like your bike that's all that matters. You shouldn't be offended by someone else's review.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Right? The best is the first-ride Yeti 150 ďreview.Ē Best bike ever until two weeks later itís gone. For me, as someone who also goes through several bikes a year, it ainít a review if you havenít spent 3-4 weeks on the bike.

    He likes to tell everyone how fast he is. Heck, maybe itís true. But being fast doesnít necessarily mean you know anything about bikes.

    Still, I hope the dude can find a rig to contain all his awesome-sauce. Iím glad itís not an Ibis so maybe thatís one sub-forum thatíll be safe.
    By far the best bike I've ever ridden for my application aside from the tire rub, false advertisement, and customer service issues. Never knocked suspension design or geometry. Actually still really bummed it won't fit a 2.5 and Yeti doesn't seem to care a 2.3 rubs. I put 475 miles on the SB150 in about 5 weeks and the bike shop ended up taking it as a return due to the issues above. I'm actually pretty worried I'm not going to find anything that compares. If you're really that concerned you can check the mileage on Strava.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    3 rides, but alright. A demo is $100/day around here. I race Enduro in "Expert Open" or Cat 1 and sometimes Pro. Call that what you want. I'm not here for a *&($ measuring contest, just trying to find a bike that suits my style.



    I'm about 50lbs heavier than Kendall. 200lb in gear, 6'1. Suspension was set as good as it was going to get with an '18 X2. LSC was mid range, HSR was fast enough to make up for all the HSC. Definitely not packing up. Most likely the 2019 X2 is a lot better for a bike like this, but again I'm not a big fan of any bike that relies so heavily on the shock. FWIW I have a couple top 20's on the Strava at Bellingham and I've only ridden there a couple days on my way to Whistler. He's probably not a user though. He is fast.




    Why are all the EWS guys on Ripmo's riding DPX2's in your opinion? Maybe it has something to do with the regressive leverage rate and the DPX2's ability to run 350psi and larger volume spacers? Certainly the DPX2 isn't better than an X2 in Fox's eyes who designed the shock for downhill applications. Most people ride really slow.... The 2018 X2 was a real bad choice for this bike. It's still on the long list but it's moved way too the back. Still considering the Evil Offering, Rallon, and Foxy 29. The Foxy still has a falling progression rate much like the Ripmo so I'm hoping to demo with a DPX2. If the coil is the only option I'll probably pass.

    Video review coming soon

    If you like your bike that's all that matters. You shouldn't be offended by someone else's review.
    Let's be clear I agree ride what you like. I take no offense I don't own one. My only point is tat any time you're reading a ton of good reviews, outlier bad ones need to be taken with a grain of salt is all.
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  27. #27
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    Come on the Guy's is just saying it blows through it's travel to easily for his liking, I have an HD3 love the bike but does blow through travel really easily, same with the Ripmo I had a demo on 2018 x2 on that bike, tried a DPX2 on the HD3 dosent bottom out so easily.

  28. #28
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    Well I ended up ordering an Ibis Ripmo, GX build, carbon Ibis wheels and bars.
    I am not a big jumper, so I went with DPX2.
    Bike should be ready next week. I canír Wait!

  29. #29
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    Volume spacers are your friend. I would just order the kit for your shock so you have them. Bikes are built around leverage ratios and the Ripmo has a flat one that works great with lower volume shocks. All the new shock have a bigger air can for more coil like feel. Also the negative volumes are much larger which gives you more sag and a more linear spring rate. Both of these work against linear leverage bikes.

    The reason the enduro team is not using x2 shocks is volume related. I bet they show up on 2019 x2's with 3-4 spacers next year.

    Congratulations on ordering the Ripmo, it's an amazing bike.

    Another thing to note is that a stiff fork will transfer more energy to the rear end. This doesn't help an already over volume rear shock.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  30. #30
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    Anyone ride a Ripmo for stuff that isn't just insane descending? I've been debating about the same bikes (hightower lt, stumpjumper, ripmo) in the Norcal forum and so far am finding that I liked the hightower lt for descending and climbing but the stumpy is probably a better trailbike, plus the Ripmo seems to probably be the most insane descender but since I need an all around bike that climbs, descends, and does well on flatter more pedally trails, I am skeptical as it seems to be more DH focused. Especially I think i'd run a 2.3 rear and the ripmo comes with very wide wheels. And the stumpy is just the right amount of travel for me, even though I felt more stable on the hightower.

    I have seen some people on more local xc trails with the ripmo though so idk.
    Quote Originally Posted by robmac48 View Post
    It becomes very difficult to use forum posts about bike ride experiences when they are all brushed over with post bike buying honeymoon hormones.
    This is most important, whatever bike someone buys, they will always tell you its the best thing ever, and most reviews aren't any better. "Climbs like an XC bike, descends like a DH bike" for every bike is an example, or "there are no bad bikes." I am pretty darn critical of things before I dump my cash on them, especially as I am a "1 bike for everything for many years to come" person. Especially as mentioned above, people are in love with their bike and taking full enduro rigs on some stuff that i'd be way faster on on an xc bike, so I get skeptical.

    My current bike is a 125mm stumpy clone so it does almost everything and makes it hard for me to justify a more aggressive bike, but for many reasons I want/ need a replacement for it, one bike that is a tiny bit more capable but also does everything well still.

    (Disclaimer: Rode a stumpy and hightower lt but not a ripmo yet, doesn't seem like my ideal bike. The rocky mountain, some guerrilla gravity, etc. are also on my list but I doubt i'll try then.)
    Quote Originally Posted by Le frog View Post
    Well I ended up ordering an Ibis Ripmo, GX build, carbon Ibis wheels and bars.
    I am not a big jumper, so I went with DPX2.
    Bike should be ready next week. I canír Wait!
    Enjoy!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by agreenbike View Post
    Anyone ride a Ripmo for stuff that isn't just insane descending? I've been debating about the same bikes (hightower lt, stumpjumper, ripmo) in the Norcal forum and so far am finding that I liked the hightower lt for descending and climbing but the stumpy is probably a better trailbike, plus the Ripmo seems to probably be the most insane descender but since I need an all around bike that climbs, descends, and does well on flatter more pedally trails, I am skeptical as it seems to be more DH focused. Especially I think i'd run a 2.3 rear and the ripmo comes with very wide wheels. And the stumpy is just the right amount of travel for me, even though I felt more stable on the hightower.

    I have seen some people on more local xc trails with the ripmo though so idk.

    This is most important, whatever bike someone buys, they will always tell you its the best thing ever, and most reviews aren't any better. "Climbs like an XC bike, descends like a DH bike" for every bike is an example, or "there are no bad bikes." I am pretty darn critical of things before I dump my cash on them, especially as I am a "1 bike for everything for many years to come" person. Especially as mentioned above, people are in love with their bike and taking full enduro rigs on some stuff that i'd be way faster on on an xc bike, so I get skeptical.
    I rode the ripmo on a cross crountry trail gradual 1.5 mile down hill (small baby jumps here and there) where you still pedal a bit going ďdownĒ and then had 3 miles of single track climbing. To me the bike felt like any other trail bike in the flat and uphill but was better going down hill due to size/stability.

    I would have no problem owning this bike for aggressive cross country if there is such a thing. I used the stock tires. 2.3Ē would probably be more fun in that situation.

  32. #32
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    The Ripmo is a fun bike to ride on mellow or flattish terrain and it also excels at climbing in general and technical climbing is one of it's strong points since DW link bikes never seem to really get hung up even when granny gearing up ledges or just trying to control your traction with a low cadence.

    I think the Ripmo is actually a bit behind some of the other bikes in the similar travel category for all out rough descending but much of that has to do with getting the rear suspension dialed in. I actually prefer the stock performance DPX that comes with the bike as it's super supportive in the mid stroke and delivers a lively ride.

    I think if you ride hard and aggressive and like to really compress the suspension Volume reducers are a must with the ripmo and make the bike damn near perfect.

    I'd say the Ripmo is the best climbing bike overall for efficiency in the 140-160mm rear travel class.

    I'd say the Ripmo is the most lively and fun bike to ride on blue flow style trails out of all those 140-160mm bikes

    I think the Ripmo is in the middle of the pack for descending composure and it's ability to eat up harsh sections of trail where bikes like the Rallon, Sentinel, HT LT and Instinct BC live for that stuff.

    You can't go wrong with the Ripmo as it's a proper do everything well and always fun which is the ultimate goal. Just be prepared to spend some time getting the rear suspension dialed depending on your ride style and mass.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Random Dude View Post
    I would have no problem owning this bike for aggressive cross country if there is such a thing. I used the stock tires. 2.3Ē would probably be more fun in that situation.
    Quote Originally Posted by skinnybex View Post
    The Ripmo is a fun bike to ride on mellow or flattish terrain and it also excels at climbing in general and technical climbing is one of it's strong points since DW link bikes never seem to really get hung up even when granny gearing up ledges or just trying to control your traction with a low cadence.
    Good points, especially the climbing bit, I rode an hd3 before and that thing climbed amazingly. Sadly it had 2.8 tires which I didn't like and I didn't like other things about the bike, otherwise I would have bought an hd3 when they were on clearance.

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