Redline Flight 1x3 Setup- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Redline Flight 1x3 Setup

    Just got off the trails from testing a new 1x3 gearing setup on my Monocog Flight. Prior to this setup I was running a 1x2 with two single-speed (Dimension) cogs (20t and 16t), separated by a 3.5 mm spacer.

    The stock Flight 'cassette' hub shoulder is narrow, (roughly 14.2 mm wide) but certainly wide enough for 3 narrow 9-speed cogs when set up properly. I used the 12,16, and 21 tooth cogs and the stock lock-ring.

    I used the following parts:

    Sram PC-951 Chain
    Shimano CS-HG61 (11-32) (must Dremel out pins holding cassette together)
    Generic Friction Thumb-Shifter
    Sram X-7 Rear Derailleur
    Redline Geared Dropout

    This setup is certainly not flawless, but is the easiest setup I've come across for a small amount of cash and old parts.

    I'm pretty sure using a Shimano Derailleur would solve the issues I had because of the different design, but I already had an X-7, so....

    The X-7 derailleur was the biggest problem. In my setup, using an X-7 derailleur causes the normal adjustment of the High and Low limit screws to interfere with each other's functions. I overcame this by putting a makeshift cable-stop on the derailleur cable before the cable guide, on the right seat-stay (photo below). This gave me my 'Low' limit adjustment. The High limit works, but uses both the limiting screws- due to the 'mid-cassette' starting position of the Derailleur. I am using a longer Low limit screw, but it only helps adjust the High limit.

    I use the Flight for MTB, grocery, and city rides. My setup reflects my needs, but could easily be tailored for any purpose.

    Cheers-
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Redline Flight 1x3 Setup-p1030311.jpg  

    Redline Flight 1x3 Setup-p1030312.jpg  

    Redline Flight 1x3 Setup-p1030313.jpg  

    Redline Flight 1x3 Setup-p1030316.jpg  

    Redline Flight 1x3 Setup-p1030315.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Why? I've seen people put two different cogs in the back for different types of terrain so if it was too easy/hard all they had to do was change to either cog. But you added deraillers and the lot. I personally would not have done that, or gone all the way and converted it over completely. To go to the trouble that you went to and transform a completely good singlespeed to this. Hey, that's just me, it's your bike and if that's what you want then by all means do it.

  3. #3
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    Why -

    1. Because they wanted to...
    2. Personally, I think anything over 6 speeds is overkill, so why not do 3?
    3. Single-speed isn't always the most practical setup.

  4. #4
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    I love to see things like this.

    You took parts you had and made it work for you.

    This world would be dull if we all followed industry marketing and had to have 8spd, I mean 9spd, I mean 10spd...

  5. #5
    directionless white male
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    What i find sweet about this is, as long as you have the cassette apart, you could swap out gears to suit the needs on different trails.

  6. #6
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    Nice!

  7. #7
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrex
    Just got off the trails from testing a new 1x3 gearing setup on my Monocog Flight. Prior to this setup I was running a 1x2 with two single-speed (Dimension) cogs (20t and 16t), separated by a 3.5 mm spacer.

    The stock Flight 'cassette' hub shoulder is narrow, (roughly 14.2 mm wide) but certainly wide enough for 3 narrow 9-speed cogs when set up properly. I used the 12,16, and 21 tooth cogs and the stock lock-ring.

    I used the following parts:

    Sram PC-951 Chain
    Shimano CS-HG61 (11-32) (must Dremel out pins holding cassette together)
    Generic Friction Thumb-Shifter
    Sram X-7 Rear Derailleur
    Redline Geared Dropout

    This setup is certainly not flawless, but is the easiest setup I've come across for a small amount of cash and old parts.

    I'm pretty sure using a Shimano Derailleur would solve the issues I had because of the different design, but I already had an X-7, so....

    The X-7 derailleur was the biggest problem. In my setup, using an X-7 derailleur causes the normal adjustment of the High and Low limit screws to interfere with each other's functions. I overcame this by putting a makeshift cable-stop on the derailleur cable before the cable guide, on the right seat-stay (photo below). This gave me my 'Low' limit adjustment. The High limit works, but uses both the limiting screws- due to the 'mid-cassette' starting position of the Derailleur. I am using a longer Low limit screw, but it only helps adjust the High limit.

    I use the Flight for MTB, grocery, and city rides. My setup reflects my needs, but could easily be tailored for any purpose.

    Cheers-
    Nice, this is one of the reasons I am interested in getting a ss hub for my next 29er rear wheel. I did a 1x3 setup once on a regular hub, but used 13t, 19t, and 28t cogs. Shifting was OK but not great (interestingly, the 19t to 28t shift was no problem), but going to a 1x4 with 13, 17, 21, 28 worked out pretty well. And I liked the gearing choices better.

    I know the problem you ran into with the SRAM RD and the set screws. I've even run into that same issue with a regular 9 speed setup (the low set screw interfered with the high setting). I found the shimano Ultegra and XT RD's worked pretty well with the 1x4 setup.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=473068
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  8. #8
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    I had a similar setup on my XXIX. It's very functional and easy to put together, and like the poster above says, can be modified for different trails. I usually ran 15-19-24 x 33, but could always swap in a larger cog for really hilly routes. In some ways, that simple Raleigh 3 speed was the most fun I've had on 2 wheels.

    I used a Shimano road dérailleur, which allowed for a nice short chain and didn't have the limit issues described in the op.

  9. #9
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    grocery shopping?

    Sweet set up dude!
    But why worry about getting groceries with the bike... that's what the wifey's for!
    JK. Nice work.
    RM ETSX
    Vassago Bandesnatch

  10. #10
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    Nice! I just experimented with the same thing recently, and it inspired me enough in one ride to start planning a build around that. I did 32 x 16-19-22 with a parts-bin Deore RD and a cheap Suntour friction shifter. Shifting was surprisingly good, but the Surly SS cogs I used were too thick and the chain rubbed on the next cog. I could probably fix this by putting bigger spacers between them

    To ThreeD, a 3 speed setup with a friction shifter is nothing like even a 1x9 with indexed shifting. There are very few adjustments necessary to make it work and there is no fiddling over indexing even if you bend the hanger. Three speeds is a good amount too. I picked my middle cog as the SS gear I had been using so I knew I could do everything with it if i wanted, then one option for even more speed, and one option to climb easier but with enough of a gap that I wouldn't be shifting back and forth.

    A setup like this may be an order of magnitude more complex than a singlespeed, but it is still imho an order of magnitude less complex than a normal geared setup. Plus it rides more like a singlespeed because of how rarely you end up shifting. Instead it makes you go up most small hills and grade changes by just pushing harder, like a normal ss

  11. #11
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    sorry to bring up an old thread, but i would like to try a 1x3 on my Cog. i think I have most of the basics down, but what would happen if i used a front (left) indexed shifter for a front 3x derailleur instead of a rear 8x or 9x derailleur? would the front shifter pull too much cable or something? it would be nice to have three clicks and three speeds.

  12. #12
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    RE: Shifty Question

    A front derailleur, 3 speed shifter, won't work with a rear derailleur because it pulls more cable than a 8 or 9 speed shifter.

    If it was me & I had those parts lying around I'd just go for it anyway- even if it doesn't work you've lost nothing but gained knowledge AND experience.

    If you use a 9 speed rear derailleur shifter, you will still have only three clicks for three gears- assuming you have used a 9 speed cassette for your rear cog spacing. Same would apply for an 8-speed shifter with an 8 speed rear cassette spacing, etc.

    An indexed thumb shifter worked for me, I'd keep an eye peeled for older XT thumb shifters, or SR Suntour XC Thumbies.

    Good luck & post your finished setup!

  13. #13
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    A front Sram Grip shifter may work because of all the "in=between" spots it has built in for trim. I have thought about trying it at some point.
    G
    You can't depend on honest answers from dependant hands...

  14. #14
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    Fantastic. I use friction shifting and most my bikes, even on my CX bike which I race.

    I've found myself pulling cogs off and using spacers or buying cassettes with less cogs. On my MTB's, I've found 2X8 to work for nearly everything except all-out flat sprinting, since I still use the 32T middle ring.

    It's neat to see somebody accomplished the 1X3 without having to go with an internally geared hub. Good Job.

  15. #15
    directionless white male
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    Mack, Actually, it's much nicer to bring up an old post than to needlessly start new.

    G-Live, You sig quotes my favorite Jimmey Eat World song and it's now in my head and I thank you.

    I like the sram grip idea because any bike shop will have half a dozen lying in a drawer from broken sets. The oldschool thumb is the safe bet, again ask the bike shop. (Don't let them charge too much either, this is sued stuff) If you're pulling the gears off a cassette you could do the right shifter provided you use the first or last three--depending on high or low normal, whichever has the cable pulled furthest out. Otherwise for the unused shifting spots you might tweek the derailer if you over shifted. Keep that in mind with the other potential shifters as well.
    Disclaimer: I ride really slow.

  16. #16
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    Nice pick up on the quote...........

    I've got a front grip shifter sitting around and a not yet used up road cassette I might try to space out on a SS hub.

    G

    Quote Originally Posted by clarence

    G-Live, You sig quotes my favorite Jimmey Eat World song and it's now in my head and I thank you.

    I like the sram grip idea because any bike shop will have half a dozen lying in a drawer from broken sets. The oldschool thumb is the safe bet, again ask the bike shop. (Don't let them charge too much either, this is sued stuff) If you're pulling the gears off a cassette you could do the right shifter provided you use the first or last three--depending on high or low normal, whichever has the cable pulled furthest out. Otherwise for the unused shifting spots you might tweek the derailer if you over shifted. Keep that in mind with the other potential shifters as well.
    You can't depend on honest answers from dependant hands...

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