Question: Cross Bike riders with Drops (Not dirt drops)- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ATXSS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    386

    New question here. Question: Cross Bike riders with Drops (Not dirt drops)

    Guys,
    I'm working on getting My Crosscheck setup as the ultimate 28" wheel All-rounder. (Read: fat tire road bike that can handle any light terrain.) Basically I have it setup with Ultegra STI Shifter and I'm planning on using Paul Cross-top levers as well.

    My question: What is the best ergonomic drop bar that you have used? Currently I have bontrager race flat-top bars which are ok but I'd like something a bit more ergonomically shaped. Has anyone used the Nitto Noodle bar on a similar type bike? This is the bar I'm leaning towards because of the swept top and the shallow bend where the lever clamps on.

    Does anyone have any other suggestions?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    No Reputation!
    Reputation: Fastskiguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,716

    Ritchey biomax II's here

    I'm diggin' the ritchey biomax II's in some wide width, not sure how wide tho...
    It's got a little flare, a little back sweep on the tops, and not much of a ramp from the tops to the hood so my hands don't slide forward (much). I'll caution that that are a really shallow drop so the hoods and the drops are almost the same trunk angle-if you want more drop the "regular" ritchey anantomical bars might be better. I've never seen the noodle bar but it sounds like a nice bar too. I think they are worth checking out.


    Quote Originally Posted by ATXSS
    Guys,
    I'm working on getting My Crosscheck setup as the ultimate 28" wheel All-rounder. (Read: fat tire road bike that can handle any light terrain.) Basically I have it setup with Ultegra STI Shifter and I'm planning on using Paul Cross-top levers as well.

    My question: What is the best ergonomic drop bar that you have used? Currently I have bontrager race flat-top bars which are ok but I'd like something a bit more ergonomically shaped. Has anyone used the Nitto Noodle bar on a similar type bike? This is the bar I'm leaning towards because of the swept top and the shallow bend where the lever clamps on.

    Does anyone have any other suggestions?

    Thanks!

  3. #3
    No Justice = No Peace
    Reputation: Lutarious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,512

    Wide, watch hit

    I bought a 44cm Ritchey WCS and although I really like the width on top, they don't really work out when I am in the drops. Turns out that the top curve is so wide that the bars rub against my arm above my wrist. I have to really bend deep at the elbow to get around it. I

    I think a better bar for me would have a wide base, but the drops would spread wider to keep that top bend out of the way.
    "Welcome to my underground lair...."

  4. #4
    Witty McWitterson
    Reputation: ~martini~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,023
    I like my Salsa Bel Laps. I' ve got them set up with campy ergo, no top mount levers though. I have the levers set up so that the top of the bar flows right into the lever, giving me a large flat profile for hand resting. The only time I go into the drops really is for downhills, otherwise I ride on the hoods. 'Crossers refer to this set up as "rotating the bars up".
    Just a regular guy.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ATXSS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    386
    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    I like my Salsa Bel Laps. I' ve got them set up with campy ergo, no top mount levers though. I have the levers set up so that the top of the bar flows right into the lever, giving me a large flat profile for hand resting. The only time I go into the drops really is for downhills, otherwise I ride on the hoods. 'Crossers refer to this set up as "rotating the bars up".

    Thanks, I plan to ride on the hoods/tops almost exclusively. Being a 99% mountain bike rider I haven't had the best results with the comfort of most road bars and STI levers. If the bar slopes down to the lever I get crampy hands. I like the new 10sp Ult levers better than the previous shape though. I'm just looking for the most comfortable hood and top position I can find.

  6. #6
    Where's Toto?
    Reputation: endure26's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,188
    I have Salsa Bell Laps on both my cross bikes. I ride them in a 46cm width. I like the wider bars for off road. I also tried some Kestrel Pro Carbon's on my Ritchey - I liked the damping quality of carbon, but couldn't justify the cost for two bikes, so they ended up on my road bike.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dyg2001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    298
    I have Nitto Noodles (aka Mod. 177) on a couple road bikes and cross bikes in 46 and 48cm widths. I like them a lot. They are very comfortable. They look nice, too--silver, engraved crests next to the stem clamp area, traditional bend--if that is important to you. I think they are a good choice for a bike that will be ridden off road, because Nitto is famous for not sacrificing strength and durability for light weight. Grant Peterson of Rivendell designed the Noodle: http://www.rivbike.com/webalog/handl...ape/16111.html

    Universal Cycles lists them for a very low price: http://www.universalcycles.com/searc...r=nitto+noodle

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: laffeaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,983
    Quote Originally Posted by Lutarious
    I bought a 44cm Ritchey WCS and although I really like the width on top, they don't really work out when I am in the drops. Turns out that the top curve is so wide that the bars rub against my arm above my wrist. I have to really bend deep at the elbow to get around it.
    Same experience here. I have 44cm Ritchey WCS bars on my race CX. I like them, but have had ths same wrist issues. I've been using them for about 3 years and I'm generally happy with them.

    I have 44cm Bontrager CX bars on my beater/commuter CX bike. I like them for comfort in the drops on downhills (the drop is pretty minimal), but for extended riding in the drops they're less comfortable than the Ritchey WCS bars - I think because the drops come back less (but that saves the knees on climbs). I've not noticed the "wrist issue" on these bars - not sure if it's the smaller drop or what.

    I used the Salsa Pro Lap for a while... nice in the drops, but I wasn't a fan on the flair when riding in the hoods - the levers are tilted too much.

    Also, I have the interupter levers on my race bike. They're nice on really sketchy steep stuff where you need your butt way off the back, but for most uses, I prefer being in the drops.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  9. #9
    jl
    jl is offline
    climb
    Reputation: jl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,293
    I like the noodle. I've never had a problem with it. I like it on and off-road.

    We don't need more to be thankful for; we just need to be more thankful.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,410
    I run the Salsa's as well...I built the bike up from the parts bin, except for the bars/brakes/shifters/brake levers...went with the Salsas specifically because of the shallow drop and the 'gentle' flair- some of the nittos and on-ones are pretty extreme and I wasnt ready for that much of a flair. I also went with the Cane Creek levers (because they are shaped like the campys but only run about $40) and bar-end shifters...those I have swiched to downtube because I want to be able to switch to singlespeed or fixed with as minimal fuss as possible......great bike- makes me smile every time I swing a leg over it!

  11. #11
    Occasionally engagedů
    Reputation: Ptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,706
    Quote Originally Posted by Fastskiguy
    I'm diggin' the ritchey biomax II's
    Me too! I've ridden legitimate off-road terrain with this bar and like it very much. It is true that there isn't much drop, but that works out well for me. I did a 230 mile day on the road with them last year (they're on an all around bike -- just change the wheels and go) and I wasn't hating them by the end, so that must mean something...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  12. #12

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    343
    Huh. I think the only time I ever ride on the flats of the bar is when I'm climbing or sitting up on a flat stretch. I've never found a situation where I'd want the extra brake levers. On sketchy downhills I'm in the drops; descending on the flats wouldn't give me enough leverage over the front wheel.

    I have the TTT something or others. Not much help there, sorry.

  13. #13
    Fahrrad fahren
    Reputation: Hjalti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    303

    Liking noodles.

    Another vote for the noodles here. My Quickbeam came stock with them, but I moved my dirt drops over to it and am using the noodles on my Fuji. Very comfortable.
    Fixing Frederick Coasting Carroll Wandering Washington

  14. #14
    Duckin' Fonuts.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    297
    I run Salsa Bell laps. 44cm for me. I really like the flared drops, They are great when standing and cranking in the drops, as they keep your forearms away from the curve at the end of the flat top of the bars. I like secondary levers for city riding, but never descend or ride offroad on the tops of the bars. I'm always on the hoods or in the drops on rough stuff for better control.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    193

    Gary's drop bar tips

    I started riding drops off road in 1987. I'll share what works for me. It's not so much what bar you run, I use Bell Laps, but how you set them up.

    Quote Originally Posted by ATXSS
    Thanks, I plan to ride on the hoods/tops almost exclusively.
    Big mistake, I think. If you truly want to be happy with drops off road you have to commit to riding in the drops. The hoods and the tops will feel squirrely and the bike will not handle well if you ride there. Save that area for smooth roads and climbs. Set the bars up so you are comfy in the drops, set the brakes up so they fit your hands best in the drops, I use my index finger to brake. If you're uncomfortable bending over that much raise your stem for a while and do some stretching. My bars are about a cm below the saddle. When standing (downhill) get your butt back and your back flat so you have no weight on your hands. The bike will like this. You will love it too once you get used to it. As you can tell I love drop bars, my MTB friends don't get why I have so much passion for skinny 38 mm tires and drop bars. Here's a trip report of a 6 day ride recently completed on my Hakkalugi.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=168647

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    314
    Quote Originally Posted by ATXSS
    Guys,


    Does anyone have any other suggestions?

    Thanks!
    Salsa Bell Lap bars for me. I ride them off road a TON...
    wow, this hurts more than it used to.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.