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  1. #1601
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshhan View Post
    15.5" frame.
    19 lbs 6 oz
    29x2.35 (Hans Dampf) in the front 29x2.25 (Nobby Nic) in the back.

    Attachment 1096078
    What did you use to pull the slack out of the chain.

  2. #1602
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shane5001 View Post
    What did you use to pull the slack out of the chain.
    Wheels Manufacturing BB30 EBB. Works great!
    Bikes, lots'o bikes

  3. #1603
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    I de-plussed the Monkey and like it more like that:

    Post pics of your FULLY RIGID SS 29er-km.jpg

  4. #1604
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    Haro Mary SS

    Here she is.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post pics of your FULLY RIGID SS 29er-haro-maryss.jpg  


  5. #1605
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    Introducing my Frankenbred

    Post pics of your FULLY RIGID SS 29er-20170813_114357.jpg

  6. #1606
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    Old thread, new pain. Rode my Karate Monkey SS with a 29x2.4 tire up front, 29x2.25 rear, Vassago rigid fork, wide aluminum bar, dropper post, yadda yadda. I was riding with a large group and I was one of two people on a singlespeed hardtail, and the only one with a rigid fork.

    Normally I ride these trails with a rigid fork and have a grand old time, but the speed I needed to maintain to keep the last rider in front of me in view meant I got really beat up in the rocky sections. It was brutal. I keep my tire pressure as low as it is safe to do without pinching the tire and I still feel like I spent those two hours inside a cement mixer truck.

    The problem is mostly the front wheel- I just can't "pick the right line" at that speed, on the kind of terrain and the rocks kill my momentum, along with my wrists.

    I was thinking a 29+ tire on a wider rim would help, but that would mean building a new wheel and buying an expensive tire. I'll see if I can borrow one and maybe build that when I can justify the expense (I blew my bike parts budget out of the water recently.)

    what's your experience with 29+ front wheels on rigid? What's the limit at which it is just not practical?

    Not interested in carbon fiber anything, for a variety of reasons. If it comes down to that, I'll just put my squish fork back on for keeping speed in the rough stuff. Make bikes metal again!

  7. #1607
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    People ride fat fronts on rigid bikes, so the limit is pretty far out there.

    I much prefer a 29+, I've run a 3" on my older KM.

    The easiest way would just buy an Innova Transformer for ~$30 and slap it on your current rim. You don't need a 40mm+ rim to run a plus tire. I run mine on Blunt 35s (30mm internal), no problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Old thread, new pain. Rode my Karate Monkey SS with a 29x2.4 tire up front, 29x2.25 rear, Vassago rigid fork, wide aluminum bar, dropper post, yadda yadda. I was riding with a large group and I was one of two people on a singlespeed hardtail, and the only one with a rigid fork.

    Normally I ride these trails with a rigid fork and have a grand old time, but the speed I needed to maintain to keep the last rider in front of me in view meant I got really beat up in the rocky sections. It was brutal. I keep my tire pressure as low as it is safe to do without pinching the tire and I still feel like I spent those two hours inside a cement mixer truck.

    The problem is mostly the front wheel- I just can't "pick the right line" at that speed, on the kind of terrain and the rocks kill my momentum, along with my wrists.

    I was thinking a 29+ tire on a wider rim would help, but that would mean building a new wheel and buying an expensive tire. I'll see if I can borrow one and maybe build that when I can justify the expense (I blew my bike parts budget out of the water recently.)

    what's your experience with 29+ front wheels on rigid? What's the limit at which it is just not practical?

    Not interested in carbon fiber anything, for a variety of reasons. If it comes down to that, I'll just put my squish fork back on for keeping speed in the rough stuff. Make bikes metal again!
    http://www.bikingtoplay.blogspot.com/
    RIGID, not "ridged" or "ridgid"
    PEDAL, not "peddle." Unless you're selling stuff

  8. #1608
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    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy View Post
    The easiest way would just buy an Innova Transformer for ~$30 and slap it on your current rim. You don't need a 40mm+ rim to run a plus tire. I run mine on Blunt 35s (30mm internal), no problems.
    I have a WTB KOM i25 front, which would be sub-optimal for a 3" wide tire, but I am sure it will work well enough for an experiment. If it makes enough of a difference, I'll build a x-wide rim wheel. Keep the "regular" wheel/ tire for use with the squishy fork and the plus for rigid duty. I'll start shopping for fatty tires to try it.

  9. #1609
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    I'll probably disqualify from this thread now by going "semi rigid" with a Lauf TR Boost fork that's on its way for my singlespeed Cotic Simple 29. I decided to give my hands and wrists a break when I had to replace my fork since I've built a pair of new wheels and chose 110x15 mm front hub. I'm not prepared to go all in and get a RS Pike. Not yet. I'll mount 29x2.6" Kenda Hellkat Pro 120 tpi front and Kenda Nevegal2 Pro 120 tpi rear 29x2.6". Also a 800 mm wide Chromag carbon handlebar equipped with soft and chunky foam grips.

    This article is conveys my take on this
    https://singletrackworld.com/2017/05...r-boost-forks/
    Wheel brewer

    "For I am a Bear of very little Brain, and long words bother me"

  10. #1610
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Old thread, new pain. Rode my Karate Monkey SS with a 29x2.4 tire up front, 29x2.25 rear, Vassago rigid fork, wide aluminum bar, dropper post, yadda yadda. I was riding with a large group and I was one of two people on a singlespeed hardtail, and the only one with a rigid fork.

    Normally I ride these trails with a rigid fork and have a grand old time, but the speed I needed to maintain to keep the last rider in front of me in view meant I got really beat up in the rocky sections. It was brutal. I keep my tire pressure as low as it is safe to do without pinching the tire and I still feel like I spent those two hours inside a cement mixer truck.

    The problem is mostly the front wheel- I just can't "pick the right line" at that speed, on the kind of terrain and the rocks kill my momentum, along with my wrists.

    I was thinking a 29+ tire on a wider rim would help, but that would mean building a new wheel and buying an expensive tire. I'll see if I can borrow one and maybe build that when I can justify the expense (I blew my bike parts budget out of the water recently.)

    what's your experience with 29+ front wheels on rigid? What's the limit at which it is just not practical?

    Not interested in carbon fiber anything, for a variety of reasons. If it comes down to that, I'll just put my squish fork back on for keeping speed in the rough stuff. Make bikes metal again!
    Even with a 29+ tire, a rigid bike will still ride like a rigid bike. It will be more comfortable and have more traction, but there's no replacing suspension if you're trying to carry a lot of speed through really rough terrain. It's rare that I truly feel at a disadvantage on a rigid 29+, but there's just no denying it in certain situations.

    I hate droppers on my rigid singlespeeds, but they are another option for you.

    One bonus of your plan that you might not have considered, is that a big tire up front will slacken your bike. I've noticed significant handling changes when doing that, and the bikes typically do a little better when going downhill.

  11. #1611
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Old thread, new pain. Rode my Karate Monkey SS with a 29x2.4 tire up front, 29x2.25 rear, Vassago rigid fork, wide aluminum bar, dropper post, yadda yadda. I was riding with a large group and I was one of two people on a singlespeed hardtail, and the only one with a rigid fork.

    Normally I ride these trails with a rigid fork and have a grand old time, but the speed I needed to maintain to keep the last rider in front of me in view meant I got really beat up in the rocky sections. It was brutal. I keep my tire pressure as low as it is safe to do without pinching the tire and I still feel like I spent those two hours inside a cement mixer truck.

    The problem is mostly the front wheel- I just can't "pick the right line" at that speed, on the kind of terrain and the rocks kill my momentum, along with my wrists.

    I was thinking a 29+ tire on a wider rim would help, but that would mean building a new wheel and buying an expensive tire. I'll see if I can borrow one and maybe build that when I can justify the expense (I blew my bike parts budget out of the water recently.)

    what's your experience with 29+ front wheels on rigid? What's the limit at which it is just not practical?

    Not interested in carbon fiber anything, for a variety of reasons. If it comes down to that, I'll just put my squish fork back on for keeping speed in the rough stuff. Make bikes metal again!
    On my Jones Plus with 3.0 Chronnies on 45mm Scrapers, I can ride pretty much everything except DH. Itís the most comfortable and capable rigid bike Iíve ever had.

  12. #1612
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    Quote Originally Posted by coke View Post
    Even with a 29+ tire, a rigid bike will still ride like a rigid bike. It will be more comfortable and have more traction, but there's no replacing suspension if you're trying to carry a lot of speed through really rough terrain.

    I hate droppers on my rigid singlespeeds, but they are another option for you.
    Worth keeping in mind: rigid is still rigid no matter how compliant everything is. At a certain point, the rider needs to just have more skill, or slow down.

    I mentioned that I have a dropper. It helps a lot in some situations, but not this one. When the bumps come this fast, I can stand up and float with or without a dropper, but that only takes me so far.

  13. #1613
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Worth keeping in mind: rigid is still rigid no matter how compliant everything is. At a certain point, the rider needs to just have more skill, or slow down.
    What Coke said. I can't speak for a true 29+, but I have a year on a 2.6 Rekon with an i29 rim on my Unit. Depending on the trails, I can give my friends on their FS rigs a run for their money, as I am sure you know exactly what I am talking about. However, there are a couple trails where I have experienced the situation you described. This one particular trail, I have no false expectations and if it is a fast group, I will get dropped. As long as I can set my pace and pick my lines, I can comfortably ride there and have good time.

    I have been riding that same trail the last couple months on my Canfield N9 with a Fox 130mm fork, and 2.6 Bontrager XR4 Team Issues F/R on i35 rims. I am still getting used to gears and a squishy fork, but it has not taken long to easily carry speed though sections that would not happen on my rigid SS. I am sure larger 3.0 tires would provide a noticeable buffer over the 2.6, but even they are going to have a limit at which they can't compete with good suspension.

    I have a Vicious Cycles fork that I ran years ago on a Fort Onyx 26er frame. Grab a hand full of brakes on a steep incline and I did not want to think about how much that fork flexed. It still felt like a rigid fork. I am sure a good carbon fork rides nice, for a rigid fork, but it is still rigid.

  14. #1614
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Worth keeping in mind: rigid is still rigid no matter how compliant everything is. At a certain point, the rider needs to just have more skill, or slow down.

    I mentioned that I have a dropper. It helps a lot in some situations, but not this one. When the bumps come this fast, I can stand up and float with or without a dropper, but that only takes me so far.
    I'm not sure the 3" tire is going to give you the relief you're looking for. Will it be better? Yes. Will it allow you to plow through rock gardens at speed? No.

    I know exactly what you're talking about when you say it's hard to keep up with riders on rough terrain. "rock garden" has 10 different levels of intensity in my experience, but they all take a toll with no suspension.

    When I take the rigid bike to trails that are rough, and I'm with fast friends (near race pace), I know my time is limited to about 2 hours before the hands start to fade. If I slowed down I could probably extent that to 3 hours.

    3" tires really take the edge off, but like you said, rigid is rigid. My SS 29er has 2.35/2.6" tires and it's great. But, 2.6" tires are nothing like proper plus tires on wide rims. They don't really belong in the same conversation.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  15. #1615
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    Braaap!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post pics of your FULLY RIGID SS 29er-1.jpg  

    Post pics of your FULLY RIGID SS 29er-img_1725.jpg  

    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  16. #1616
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Worth keeping in mind: rigid is still rigid no matter how compliant everything is. At a certain point, the rider needs to just have more skill, or slow down.

    I mentioned that I have a dropper. It helps a lot in some situations, but not this one. When the bumps come this fast, I can stand up and float with or without a dropper, but that only takes me so far.
    Here's a picture that might help you visualize the change. Bike on the left has 40mm internal width rims and 29x3.0 Ranger tires. Bike on the right has 26mm internal width rims and a 29x2.6 nobby nic on the front and a 2.35 Ikon on the rear.

    Post pics of your FULLY RIGID SS 29er-img_20170915_133616357_3.jpg

  17. #1617
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    Rigid and loving it.

    Post pics of your FULLY RIGID SS 29er-my-khs-solo-one.jpg

    KHS Solo One, still loving it!
    Living in the moment is always better on two wheels.

  18. #1618
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    Quote Originally Posted by coke View Post
    Here's a picture that might help you visualize the change. Bike on the left has 40mm internal width rims and 29x3.0 Ranger tires. Bike on the right has 26mm internal width rims and a 29x2.6 nobby nic on the front and a 2.35 Ikon on the rear.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    With a rigid 29x3 up front, is there sufficient reason to run more than a 29x2.6 in back, especially if SS? If it's trail riding, and one is craving more than 2.6 in back, isn't it time to get a suspension fork before going bigger in back?

    I see you're staggering one of your bikes, but not the other, so I'm interested in hearing your opinion on staggered vs. non-staggered, for rigid trail bikes.

  19. #1619
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    My take.... it kind of depends how OCD you are and your riding style. Personally, I'd tried the differing size thing a couple of times over the last 25 years and I find that it drives me crazy. Also, since I'm right about 200lbs, 2.6 works quite well front and rear. I've found that 3" just adds more weight without adding much cush and definitely no additional grip.... although, I tend to run higher pressures than many.

  20. #1620
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1 View Post
    With a rigid 29x3 up front, is there sufficient reason to run more than a 29x2.6 in back, especially if SS? If it's trail riding, and one is craving more than 2.6 in back, isn't it time to get a suspension fork before going bigger in back?

    I see you're staggering one of your bikes, but not the other, so I'm interested in hearing your opinion on staggered vs. non-staggered, for rigid trail bikes.
    On rigid bikes, I prefer 3Ē front and rear. The large rear tire provides a lot of benefits.


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  21. #1621
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    2018 Trek Stache SS.

    Post pics of your FULLY RIGID SS 29er-img_3589.jpg

    This bike has taught me to be a smooth, fast rider in all sorts of terrain and conditions. My FS geared bike is so easy to ride after learning on this thing.

  22. #1622
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    I'm new to mountain biking. I haven't bought a bike yet. I will be putting Surly Sunrise riser bars and stem on whatever bike I get because of past wrist and elbow injuries. I would like to ride a SS rigid bike. I will be cruising around town with the fam and hit the local trails, which are pretty flat, from time to time. What is the difference in performance and comfort, if any, in a 29 vs 27.5 sized tire for said bike? From what I've read, a wider, bigger tire is preferred. Thanks.

    Sent from my LM-G710VM using Tapatalk

  23. #1623
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    Quote Originally Posted by beastmaster View Post
    2018 Trek Stache SS.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This bike has taught me to be a smooth, fast rider in all sorts of terrain and conditions. My FS geared bike is so easy to ride after learning on this thing.
    That is one sexy whip!
    Living in the moment is always better on two wheels.

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