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Thread: Pole Stamina

  1. #1
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    Pole Stamina

    Looks like Pole are taking things even further. Wonder if it will be dual crown ready for crossover dh usage...Pole Stamina-fb_img_1539431356679.jpg

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    Oh boy, they let the kids name it.
    Last edited by Dale-Calgary; 4 Weeks Ago at 01:03 PM.

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    They really like that BB concentric pivot. I'm afraid of that being wonky...

    Story about it here: https://polebicycles.com/we-have-stamina/

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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    They really like that BB concentric pivot. I'm afraid of that being wonky...

    Story about it here: https://polebicycles.com/we-have-stamina/
    Why would it be wonky?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPaulus View Post
    Why would it be wonky?
    When I think of the BB shell being stressed with even higher loads, flexing, and upsetting alignment and tolerances, I think of creaks and premature bearing wear. They said they went a season on the Machine without problems, so I shouldn't be worried, so I guess it's plain ol' epistemophobia, or whatever the fear of the unknown is called.

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    Pole Stamina-gzfez0l.jpg

    Pole Stamina-yxkhdhn.jpg

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
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    What in the world...

    They get full credit for not caring about aesthetics.

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    How far into its travel does it sit when you're riding it, 'cause that seat tube angle...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    What in the world...

    They get full credit for not caring about aesthetics.
    I think it looks amazing.

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    Numbers and some footage: https://polebicycles.com/pole-stamin...is-rolling-in/

    If they will scale that beast down to Pike/Fox 34 territory my wallet will be in serious trouble.

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    I notice that Leo is calling himself an engineer instead of industrial designer. Good upgrade in title, and explains the different look, to be one of function.

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    I really like the steep seat tube angle. That is my only complaint on the evolink 158. A steeper seat tube angle will make it easier for ppl like me who want longer reach but dont want long ett to size up. This bike will be out of my price range, but if they make a Evolink 180 then i am all in. But first i need to save some money for an Evolink 110.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    What in the world...

    They get full credit for not caring about aesthetics.
    Yep, that’s one fugly bike. I also wager that back end is flexy.
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower 29er
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  14. #14
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    I'd really like to try one and see how it rides, it's geometry is really wild.

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    Saw a Pole at an intersection at the local trail system recently. Asked the guy how he liked it. Said it was awesome, with typical platitudes like “pedals like an XC bike”.

    Then he rode away as I was responding to a text from my wife. Going up a smooth fire road, his suspension must have been going through half of the travel. Seated, low power pedaling.


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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Saw a Pole at an intersection at the local trail system recently. Asked the guy how he liked it. Said it was awesome, with typical platitudes like “pedals like an XC bike”.

    Then he rode away as I was responding to a text from my wife. Going up a smooth fire road, his suspension must have been going through half of the travel. Seated, low power pedaling.


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    It amazes me when people can't feel a suspension cycling through it's travel as they pedal. Their pedal stroke must be so horrible that they just can't tell.

    In another note, I'm also amazed that any company can make a horrible rear suspension anymore. This isn't the 90's where all of the companies are trying new, wild designs. We know what works now. Very few designs are just plain bad. I'd be truly interested in a good review of this bike.

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    The linkage on the Stamina should be pretty much the same as on the Evolink and the Machine and there is a bunch of reviews posted about them, including discussion about climbing and pedaling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    amazed that any company can make a horrible rear suspension anymore.

    I don't know that there is such a thing as 'horrible' anymore. Although there are wildly differing variants of 'good'.

    What surprises me is what people can get used to, and then defend, even when they haven't tried anything different for years. If ever.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I don't know that there is such a thing as 'horrible' anymore. Although there are wildly differing variants of 'good'.

    What surprises me is what people can get used to, and then defend, even when they haven't tried anything different for years. If ever.
    Yeah, that's what I meant. Very few bad designs.

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Saw a Pole at an intersection at the local trail system recently. Asked the guy how he liked it. Said it was awesome, with typical platitudes like “pedals like an XC bike”.

    Then he rode away as I was responding to a text from my wife. Going up a smooth fire road, his suspension must have been going through half of the travel. Seated, low power pedaling.
    What model was it?

    Pole Stamina-p5pb11788441.jpg

  21. #21
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    Evolink 140.

    I wonder if those bikes experience premature shock wear and tear. Dude looked like he was riding up a technical climb when going up an 8% grade fire road.



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  22. #22
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    The one I pictured looks like it's at high risk for premature shock wear. Evolink doesn't look to be at risk of it, at least not any more than other comparable dual link designs.

    What about the look of the rider gives you that impression that it looked like he was riding up a technical climb? His positioning and technique?




    Pole Stamina-p5pb14645450.jpgPole Stamina-p5pb14645449.jpg

    Here's a pic of a rider on an Evolink on about a fireroad with ~8% slope.

    One thing I notice is that the rider's entire body is seemingly comfortably between the two wheels. Looks like the seated position is still behind the standing position, based on hip location, despite the steep seat tube angle.

    The forward position might seem like something you do on a technical/steep climb, but fundamentally that technique is to compensate for weight being too rearward, which results in symptoms like the front being easily unweighted and easily deflected. A bike can have nose-heavy geometry, by lengthening the chainstay and/or shortening the front center, but then weight would need to be kept rearward to avoid the rear wheel slipping, so standing climbing is undesirable. It's a weight balance game. Pole seems to have changed the rules of such a game by lengthening the wheelbase, keeping the proportions of the front center in check with the rear center (chainstay length), centering the rider CoG between the axles. Maybe a bit more rearward in this example... I can see the reasoning behind going with an even steeper seat tube angle, compared to this.

    "Climbs like an XC bike." Lots of missing context to know what this means in his terms. While I wish people had better vocab, I can still deduce that there's something about an XC bike makes it desirable for climbing, that can also apply to the Evolink. It's quite doubtful that such a heavy long travel bike is going to get climbing KOMs on 8% grade fireroads, but I do know that XC bikes are chosen to save energy on the climbs (and long travel bikes to save energy on downhills). Perhaps that's what he means... do you not use/waste energy holding an unnatural position on a bike to maintain fore/aft balance?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    What model was it?

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    Damn. Not often anymore that you see the shock as a structural member. Not since the old Amp days if I'm not mistaken. I'm sure there are other examples but the industry moved on for a reason. Over stressing and flexy as hell.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    Damn. Not often anymore that you see the shock as a structural member. Not since the old Amp days if I'm not mistaken. I'm sure there are other examples but the industry moved on for a reason. Over stressing and flexy as hell.

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    It's similar to the Specialized P.Slope.

    Arguably stiffer than the Orange and old Santa Cruz single pivots. Other designs include the Wild Insolent. Shocks have evolved since to have more bushing overlap.

    There's some 4-bars that are more flexy than these, especially ones that don't use 1 piece rockers (see Canfield Riot). Where do you see long flimsy structural members here?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    It's similar to the Specialized P.Slope.

    Arguably stiffer than the Orange and old Santa Cruz single pivots. Other designs include the Wild Insolent. Shocks have evolved since to have more bushing overlap.

    There's some 4-bars that are more flexy than these, especially ones that don't use 1 piece rockers (see Canfield Riot). Where do you see long flimsy structural members here?
    As I said, the shock is being used as an actual structural member. There aren't any linkages before the shock to help alleviate side loading/twisting of the rear triangle.

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  26. #26
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    Also, yes, similar to the p slope.

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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    The one I pictured looks like it's at high risk for premature shock wear. Evolink doesn't look to be at risk of it, at least not any more than other comparable dual link designs.

    What about the look of the rider gives you that impression that it looked like he was riding up a technical climb? His positioning and technique?




    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's a pic of a rider on an Evolink on about a fireroad with ~8% slope.

    One thing I notice is that the rider's entire body is seemingly comfortably between the two wheels. Looks like the seated position is still behind the standing position, based on hip location, despite the steep seat tube angle.

    The forward position might seem like something you do on a technical/steep climb, but fundamentally that technique is to compensate for weight being too rearward, which results in symptoms like the front being easily unweighted and easily deflected. A bike can have nose-heavy geometry, by lengthening the chainstay and/or shortening the front center, but then weight would need to be kept rearward to avoid the rear wheel slipping, so standing climbing is undesirable. It's a weight balance game. Pole seems to have changed the rules of such a game by lengthening the wheelbase, keeping the proportions of the front center in check with the rear center (chainstay length), centering the rider CoG between the axles. Maybe a bit more rearward in this example... I can see the reasoning behind going with an even steeper seat tube angle, compared to this.

    "Climbs like an XC bike." Lots of missing context to know what this means in his terms. While I wish people had better vocab, I can still deduce that there's something about an XC bike makes it desirable for climbing, that can also apply to the Evolink. It's quite doubtful that such a heavy long travel bike is going to get climbing KOMs on 8% grade fireroads, but I do know that XC bikes are chosen to save energy on the climbs (and long travel bikes to save energy on downhills). Perhaps that's what he means... do you not use/waste energy holding an unnatural position on a bike to maintain fore/aft balance?
    What I was referring to is this: his bike was bobbing not from the terrain, but from his pedal stroke. While he might have had his bike set up per the manufacturer's recommendation, it looked horrendously inefficient. He was riding non-technical terrain (a fire road) but his suspension was compressing and bobbing significantly under that load. There was a lot of excessive motion occurring.

    Given that I ride the trails there every day, I was kind of perplexed by this. I was wondering if some braking bumps had developed there since I'd last ridden that area. As I was coming up behind him I switched lines to see what was going on. Nope, nothing. No bumps, no rocks. Just suspension bobbing wildly under pedaling forces.

    Re: position. I'm more worried about hip angle than I am with maintaining traction. I don't lean forward or scoot forward on the saddle for traction; that's mostly a technique thing.
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    Must've contracted Cove Bikes to name this.

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