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  1. #1
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    Pole Evolink 150: Build/Ride Log

    I will use this thread to post updates to the bike as well as riding impressions and I get more time in the saddle. There are not many Poles in the US and I am a firm believer in their progressive bike design. Long reach, long wheel base, slack headtube, steep seat tube; the thought is with a larger cockpit the rider has more comfort and space to move and with the rider centered between the axles the added stability aids in grip, confidence, and speed going up and downhill.

    At 6'8" 250lbs, 7'2" wingspan, and an aggressive riding style I am continually searching for bikes which fit me well and can handle my riding style. Last October I picked up a XXL Santa Cruz Hightower LT and rode it for 9 months. In terms of geometry and performance it was a huge step in the right direction from my previous bike but fell short in certain areas.

    On the HTLT I struggled to get my Fox 36 PE and DPX2 dialed in with the VPP suspension. I was near maximum PSI both F/R to hit recommended sag numbers, I also can a "firm" VC49 tune in the 36 which made for a "very communicative" suspension setup, IE no suppleness. This didn't really bother me much at the time since I love riding hardtails and like the trail feedback but in retrospect after spending some time on the Pole, the suspensions are night and day different. My other main complaint with the HTLT was the slack seatube as it put me way behind the bottom bracket when climbing, it was nice to feel that added reach with the seat up and back but on steeper climbs I really felt like I was in a fetal position with my chest down and pedaling the cranks in front of me, big load on the quads.

    I was also blowing through drivetrain components, I went through 2 E13 TRSr cassettes, quickly wore out 1 SRAM GX cassette, destroyed 3 Novatec freehubs, and broke a few chains. I can put some power down but I am curious to see how my drivetrain holds up on my Poke, since I have a hunch that with my static weight and the pedal kickback of the VPP that the combo may have really added premature wear on the drivetrain, the Pole has a slight amount of pedaling platform ealy in the suspension stroke but then fades so the suspension will stay active. I am hoping my drivetrain lasts much longer without the constant forces/feedback from suspension activity.

    Overall the XXL HTLT is a nice bike for big guys but still a little undersized me. I am planning on getting a Pole Taival (steel hardtail) later this summer but they are still in production. In the meantime I found a nice deal on a lightly used XL Evolink 150. Pole is known for long and slack bikes and aside from the Nicolai Geometron or a fully custom frame they are the longest bikes available. The reach on the Evolink is about +40mm longer than the XXL hightower, the headtube is 63.5" which is the same as the Santa Cruz V10, seattube is a steep 77.5 to keep you centered while climbing.

    One thing to note is this Evolink 150 is their last generation frame which was built around 27.5" wheels but can accommodate 29". Modern Evolinks (131, 140, 158) are built for 29" wheels but the suspension design and frame design is essentially the same with one exception, the modern Evolinks have a lower BB and much greater stack. My 150 has about 50mm less stack than the modern frames and I definitely notice it since I have to jack my seat up to get proper leg extension with the high BB which put my handlebars low and disrupts what should be a very comfortable and neutral pedaling position. I will make some bar/stem/seat/CSU adjustments to remedy this but that 50mm of stack will be a welcomed addition, especially for larger riders.

    The bike arrived with a decent build kit but I had a pike of parts intended for my hardtail which I borrowed some items from to help make the Evolink better suited for me and my style, durability and capability are top priorities.

    Here are the build specs.
    Lyrik RCT3 + Luftkappe air cap
    Monarch Plus
    Industry 9-E13 TRS+ wheels
    Eagle GX
    Magura MT5 brakes, HC levers
    9point8 200mm Dropper
    Ergon SR3-L
    ANVL 50mm stem, Deity Holeshot 825mm bars
    WolfTooth Fat Paw Grips
    Crank Brothers Stamp 3 Large pedals
    Maxxis Minion DHF, Aggressor 2.5
    Cushcores

    Here is how the bike arrived with different wheels, tires, brakes, bars, stem, seat, and seatpost.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3121.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3123.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3124.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3130.jpg

  2. #2
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    Time to get to work.

    I had a 2018 Yari which had a longer steerer tube so I used that CSU and swapped over the Lyrik internals and lowers.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3157.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3159.jpg

    Stock Air shaft left, shaft modded with Luftkappe right.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_e3160.jpg

    There was some wear on the chain stays so I added some 3M mastic tape.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3131.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3132.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3212.jpg

    I decided to swap out the rear shock bushing for a RWC needle bearing, it should help with suppleness (which is already great) hopefully it holds up to the forces I put it through.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3201.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-edhy6659.jpg

  3. #3
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    That's a nice bike, looking good.

    Great report and detail, super helpful for people on the high end of the normal height range. Super hard for you guys, especially back in the old slack seat tube days. Here's to better climbing for you now.

  4. #4
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    Beautiful bike, I can't wait to read more updates!

  5. #5
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    If you donít crush that bike it says volumes. Tuning in for Pole narrative.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Bicycling is politics by other means.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamK View Post
    That's a nice bike, looking good.

    Great report and detail, super helpful for people on the high end of the normal height range. Super hard for you guys, especially back in the old slack seat tube days. Here's to better climbing for you now.
    Thanks, I hope others find it useful or at least entertaining.

    QR collar swapped for a sleeker Hope collar.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3233.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3234.jpg

    Took advantage of the Rockshox fork and got some Torque caps for the i9 hub.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3231.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_e3230.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3232.jpg

    It took a few tries to get a clean bleed on the Maguras but I finally had success and they feel great, also installed the Cushcore inserts.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3209.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3115.jpg


    Here are some pics after the mods and some detail shots.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3238.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3240.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3242.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3175.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3174.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3168.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3171.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3172.jpg

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperStang View Post
    Beautiful bike, I can't wait to read more updates!
    Thanks, more to come!
    Quote Originally Posted by Structure View Post
    If you donít crush that bike it says volumes. Tuning in for Pole narrative.
    I am an excellent durability tester! I should see if I can flip the scenario and have companies pay ME to break their parts! lol

    So far the frame itself feels solid and stiffer than the Santa Cruz, I also notice it tracking better in rough stuff. I know Santa Cruz engineers their carbon to have some compliance but I think with my size it was a little excessive, when I first got the HTLT I would double and triple check my hubs, axles, and pivots since the lateral movement of the rear wheel made me think something was loose!

    In comparison the Pole just feels solid which I really appreciate given my size/weight.

    Evan

  8. #8
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    Although not 100% necessary since this bike has a high bottom bracket, I still chose to install the OneUp Bash-guide for peace of mind, it is a negligible weight penalty for keeping your chain secure and protecting your chain/chainring.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3266.jpg

    With most of the build complete and accessories added I threw her on the scale. 35.8lbs isn't bad IMO considering the LONG aluminum frame, 29" wheels, Cushcores, and beefy components.
    For reference my XXL Hightower LT was 34.4lbs
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3268.jpg

    Speaking of Santa Cruz here is how an XL Tallboy measures up to an XL Evolink. The rear axles are aligned in this photo.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3219.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3217.jpg

    With the monster wheelbase of the Evolink I had to slide the rail on my Thule roof rack backwards to accommodate. It fits, barely.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3213.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3264.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3265.jpg

  9. #9
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    Nice write-up. I followed your Hightower thread, and enjoyed it! I'll be looking forward to your thoughts on the Magura brakes, as I'm in the market for a new set.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willstylez View Post
    Nice write-up. I followed your Hightower thread, and enjoyed it! I'll be looking forward to your thoughts on the Magura brakes, as I'm in the market for a new set.
    Glad you enjoyed it, this thread will be very similar!

    As for Maguras, I ran some Louise FR brakes back in the day and really enjoyed them with their modulation and ample power.

    Coming from Shimano M8000 brakes on 203mm rotors I loved the responsiveness of the brakes and the serviceability but needed more power. Excluding the exotic brakes like Trickstuff the top dogs in stopping power are always Saints and MT5/MT7s with Maguras offering a more manageable modulation of that power. Both use mineral oil which is great and I can't believe companies still use Dot. Magura would have hit the nail on the head if they spec'd better levers on the MT5 but they offer these cheap feeling, sometimes flimsy, plastic levers which are out of place. If you get along with the stock levers then there is no reason not to get the MT5s if you want the best performance/price ratio.

    Personally I needed better levers and coming from Shimano I really like the small 1-finger trigger style so I remedied this situation by buying a pair of MT Trail Sport brakes and an which come with aluminum trigger style levers, a 4 piston up front, 2 piston rear. Then bought an additional MT5 brake so I would replace the 2 piston rear with the 4 piston caliper. Now I have MT5 calipers with nice levers which include reach adjustment and I can sell the MT5 lever + 2 piston caliper which is essentially an MT4 brake to recover some cost. Upgraded levers and single calipers are available individually but they are priced in a way which dilute the deal. For example an MT5 caliper is $100 but you can find a complete MT5 brake system for that price if not less.

    Shortly after installing these brakes I found a killer deal on eBay where a guy was selling 3 MT5 brakes, I bought all of them for $170. 2 are like-new and 1 is literally new. Since these have the MT5 levers I will experiment with running Shimano levers and creating "Shigura" brakes. There is a long thread on RideMonkey where people collect brake data and experiment on mixing and matching brakes and levers in hopes of creating the ultimate brake. There are people running this Shimano lever + Magura caliper with success and it sounds very interesting, essentially the Shimano levers offer a bit more poweron the Magura calipers and the end result is a more power (with less force) than a complete Magura setup but not as instant-on like a complete Shimano system. As a bonus the SLX, XT, or Zee levers can all be had for reasonable prices usually $60-$70 will get you a new pair if you are a savvy shopper. I am optimistic about this since the Shimano levers offer great ergonomics, easy servicing, and are an economical acquisition. I don't find myself needing more lever power over my current MT5 setup but knowing how my old Shimanos were, having a system which blends the two does sound appealing.

    Evan

  11. #11
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    I had a member privately message me about my thoughts comparing the VPP vs Evolink suspension. Although saddle time has been limited on the Pole I was happy to offer my current observations. It ended up being rather long-winded so I figured I should share it here for others.

    Cheers,
    Evan

    ----------------------------

    As for suspension, it is hard to compare apples-apples since I was running Fox 36 (Fit4 with the older "firm" VC49 tune) + DPX2 on the HTLT where I am on a Lyrik RCT3 + Monarch Plus RC3 so both kinematics and components differ but I can compare my current observations the complete packages. For pedaling the VPP is noticeably superior, I never once thought about touching my lockout, the HTLT felt like a hardtail with some give in this regard.

    My Fox had 3 volume reducers and ran ~110psi out of 120max. DPX2 @320psi w/ large reducer.

    Currently my Lyrik is @120psi out of 140max with 2 volume reducers. Monarch Plus is 320psi out of 340max and I haven't checked volume reducers, I assume none.

    Both setups put me in the 27-30% sag range.

    It is worth noting that on the Fox setup I NEVER bottomed out but was frequently using 80-90% of travel, so maybe a little less usage than ideal but I loved the high ride and support.

    So far with the Rockshox I am experiencing similar max travel use on the Lyrik up front although it does sit a bit deeper in it's travel (it's also much more supple), keep in mind I have the Luftkappe air piston installed. In the rear I am using 95-100% travel but have never noticeably bottomed, assuming I have zero volume reducers installed adding 2 should offer a nice improvement.

    With the Pole I am still testing different sag settings but running 28-30% sag the pedaling is "fine" definitely more give than VPP but TBH it doesn't bother me for a few reasons: I don't RACE uphill, the suspension is more active so I have better grip climbing and the ride is more comfortable when seated. This can be subjective, some people might be more particular about suspension support while climbing but for me it isn't terribly important, more of a luxury than a necessity. It is important to remember that anti-squat and suspension activity are inversely related, VPP is more anti-squat, Evolink is more suspension freedom/activity.

    The difference riding the 2 is night and day with my strong preference going towards the Evolink. My Lyrik is noticeably more supple than the Fit4 Fox 36 up front and the Evolink is WAY more plush out back with the same sag setting. It is worth noting that I setup my Fox suspension to recommended factory specs, set sag and then both rebound and compression are in the middle, IIRC I took a couple clicks off of both. On the Pole I am running ZERO compression and only 5 clicks of rebound (out of ~20 from full open) this is what Leo recommends and it allows the Pole to stay active and gobble up the small stuff. On the Santa Cruz when I would take too much rebound off I would feel like I was going to be ejected on a pogo stick but not on the Pole, perhaps it is due to the higher leverage ratio? I have read in some reviews that the Monarch Plus felt average on some bikes but performed very well on the Pole. Not sure what to attribute the ability of the Pole to have such little rebound and compression yet still feel controlled but I like it.

    The increased activity of the Evolink yields lots of grip, both climbing and and descending and improved tracking flying through rough stuff where the SC would get pinged and bounced around. Factor in the longer reach and slacker H/A with the grip and tracking and you can see why these bikes are fast and comfortable.

    Another aspect of the suspension design that I will be observing with this bike is drivetrain wear. On my HTLT it took me about 8 weeks to wear the E13 cassette down to the point where my chain would pop/slip over teeth (with proper chain wrap) I went through 2 E13 cassettes before switching. Aluminum cassettes stood no chance and even the full-steel 11psd GX cassette I put on was showing signs of wear but it lasted about x2 as long. To be expected with my size/weight/power I suppose but still the wear seemed excessive. Now that I have the Pole and can feel how FREE the suspension is from lack of drivetrain feedback that got me thinking about how much tension is ALWAYS on the drivetrain with the VPP. Factor in me being 260lbs geared up and riding rough terrain that is a lot of fighting between the chain and cassette, the pressure between the two is applied in the same way it is when pedaling which makes sense how lots of anti-suat can have a big impact on drivetrain wear, rounding off cassette teeth and such. The Pole has a little of anti-squat at first and then it fades off, just enough AS to keep the pedaling performance "acceptable" while allowing the suspension to do it's thing free of restraint.

    Overall my riding style isn't going to change between the two bikes, if anything I will be pedaling more often on the Pole since I will have the traction and confidence to add a few pedal strokes in rough stuff; it will be interesting to observe the life of my drivetrain and see if there is any correlation between lifespan and suspension design, my guess is there will be in favor of the Pole applying less stress ....which would be great since I am now on Eagle GX and replacing and Eagle cassette every few months will get expensive. "normal" people may not suffer from annoyances like this but the struggle is real for us Clydesdales.

  12. #12
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    Nice e34!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    Nice e34!
    E39*

    Thanks, have an E61 as well, love me some wagons!

  14. #14
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    - yeah, I'm 6'1', and I've been eye-balling the newest Evolink........tempting but I'll wait just a bit.........
    Rigid 29er Ti SS / 29er SC Tallboy AL / Paketa Magnesium Road Bike

  15. #15
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    Great thread uscbwsr. Appreciate the bike porn and tech details. The bike is sick looking. You can really see the progressive geo on the side view. Pure sex.

    The current XL Evolinks appear to have the fit / geo I seek. They may be a little slacker that I would prefer, but size-wise Iíve always had longish stems combined with setback posts and seat jammed all the way back. Would be nice to try a longer bike, including a longer reach.

    Regarding drivetrain components, Iím surprised that wear is impacted by the lower anti-squat, but I wonít argue with the initial results.

    Question: How does the bike pedal on the flats or smoother uphill runs? I donít like flipping levers during a ride to kill pedal bob. The Evolinks appear to have an anti-squat curve like the Speshy FSRs, which I do not like.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JACKL View Post
    Question: How does the bike pedal on the flats or smoother uphill runs? I donít like flipping levers during a ride to kill pedal bob. The Evolinks appear to have an anti-squat curve like the Speshy FSRs, which I do not like.
    I also hate flipping lock out levers. On the Santa Cruz it simply wasn't needed and on the Evolink it helps but not enough to warrant me to reach all the way down there. I think pedaling bob could be subjective, personally the Pole does move more than the Santa Cruz but it doesn't bother me and I don't feel like much of my effort is wasted. Hard to say if it will bother you.

    One thing to consider is the Evolink relies heavily on the shock tune to counteract pedal bob. I have ZERO clicks of compression front or rear and only a little rebound so my suspension is about as active as can be, as recommended by the founder of Pole. For someone wanting more pedaling support it sounds like playing around with compression and possibly different shocks would be worth exploring since the suspension should be very response to subtle changes.

  17. #17
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    During the past month I have logged roughly 180 miles and 18,000 feet of climbing on the Evolink and have some continued thoughts to share.

    It's Fast! GPS confirms this Anytime the bike is pointed downhill it carries effortless speed and the steeper/chunkier the terrain (such as pictured below), the better. The geometry really cloaks you in confidence and with the larger cockpit, long chainstay, and steep H/A it seems to slow everything a bit. There is some truth to saying your "monster trucking" over everything since it is so capable and takes hits well but that would be a little unjust since it isn't a one dimensional point-and-shoot DH weapon; I find it to be playful and fun at the same time.

    Cornering the bike is very satisfying since it requires more body English and as a rider you get to throw your weight around more. Some might think of this as a downside if you want to minimize body movement but the way I think of this is similar to taking a big carve on a snowboard, wakeboard, or surfboard; the harder you lean, the bigger the carve and (for me) the bigger the smile. This bike encourages you to ride properly since you really need to dip the handle bar and lean the bike over when entering corners.

    Manuals do take some getting used to and are not as easy as they are on other bikes. With long chainstays there is really no way around this aside from sharpening your bike handling skills and adapting to the bike's geometry.

    Climbing has been a very interesting experience so far. At 36lbs, 29" wheels, 2.5 Maxxis tires, and Cushcores this isn't a rocket uphill but it does excel in 2 areas: comfort and capability. For easy-moderate climbs it's drama free; just pedal and you comfortably move forward with a nice body position, a nice hip to foot relation that allows an efficient leg extension, and an active suspension soaking up terrain without excessive bob.

    When the terrain gets steeper (10-20% incline) on a trail offering good traction all you do is ....the same thing. Your inclination is to lean forward lowering your chest towards the step to help weight the front tire, no need on the Pole. Simply stay upright as you would be on a lesser climb, keep your comfortable body position, and feel the added load on your legs. With the long chainstays and long wheelbase it takes much steeper terrain to make the front wheel lift.

    Doing my best to quantify this I would say compared to a "normal" bike the incline would have to be ~30% steeper for the front to wander or lift on the Pole. In addition you can stay seated on sections where you would be forced out of the saddle on a normal bike, I attribute this to your upright body position allowing you put the power down and stay seated. My Hightower LT on the real steep stuff I felt like I was riding a recumbent bike and all the power had to come from my quads and I was forced up to get better leg extension.

    Next up is technical climbing. This is what's really throwing me for a loop and the adaptation has been slow. So far on easy climbs it's comfortable and on steeper climbs it stays planted, has traction, and allows you to stay seated for longer and in a more efficient pedaling position. Remaining seated and keeping your weight center towards the rear of the bike gets tricky once you have larger obstacles to clear. The byproduct of lowering your chest to weight the front wheel is it lightens the load on the rear tire which allows it to roll over obstacles easier, same with thing happens when getting out of the saddle. You may sacrifice traction but the bike is more maneuverable and is less disrupted by rocks, roots, etc.

    Personally I am not a very good technical climber and I am working on trying to stay light on the bike while seated but it's very challenging to find new-to-me balance between being seated and knowing when to get out of the saddle. On the chunkier climbs I know the bike has the grip for me to stay seated but I am forced up/off the to get the rear tire over obstacles. Practice makes perfect!

    Overall the bike continues to impress and there has been nothing to complain about in terms of construction/quality/etc. The aluminum frame feels very robust and has a pleasant amount of compliance. In contrast to the Hightower which for someone my size I felt offered too much flex, not a nock on Santa Cruz since I know they intentionally lay their carbon to have certain ride characteristics, I just think those characteristics are geared towards 130-180lb riders, not 270lb Clydesdales like myself.


    Evan
    Attachment 1210576

  18. #18
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    2 months of ownership and a few hundred miles of use so far and big smiles.

    I have just about worn through my front Magura MT5 brake pads and I will be replacing them with the MT7 pads which offer slightly more surface area. The bearings in the linkage are showing signs of wear, not sure the mileage of them prior to taking delivery of the bike but I will be replacing/upgrading them to the Enduro "Max" which utilize 2 rows of smaller balls instead of a single row and offer ~40% more load capacity, no brainer for me given my size and the linkage design on the Pole.

    My manuals/wheelies are up to my relatively high standard so Evan 1 : Long wheelbase 0.

    There are no significant observations on the ride characteristics which have not already been mentioned. The bike is still extremely capable uphill and rips downhill. My comfort level with the bike is slowly progressing so I am able to slap corners harder and approach obstacles with more confidence, carry more speed, and just enjoy mountain biking!

    I have made several functional and aesthetic tweaks to the bike:

    Stiff is good. Rockshox Torque caps made a noticeable improvement in wheel rigidity, more than I was expecting to be honest.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3231.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_e3230.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3232.jpg

    Wasn't a fan of the bulky QR collar so I swapped it for a Hope.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3233.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3234.jpg

    Got tired of having the threads stripping on the plastic valve caps so I bought some metal ones.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_e3445.jpg

    I need more stack and unfortunately I couldn't find a deal on a longer CSU and I am not looking to swap forks at this time so I did what I could to bring the bars up as high as possible. I LOVE the Anvl stem and will be keeping it for my hardtail (it has 5mm rise where most stems have 0) but snagged a DMR stem since it offered an additional 8mm of height via 5mm rise and smaller stack, not sure amped on decreasing the surface area on the steering tube but it was the second priority to the bar height.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_e3489.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-wqly0700.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4110.jpg

    I prefer the clean fitment of bolt-on axles. Maxles were swapped for Maxle Stealths.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-ykiu8674.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4111.jpg

    Finally bought a replacement cable guide for the frame, one was missing when I received the frame.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4105.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4106.jpg

    With my power steel>aluminum for drivetrain and the stock aluminum chainring was replaced with a steel X-Sync 2 chainring. I much prefer to sleek/thin looks of the steel over the chunky aluminum model.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4107.jpg

    Type-A kicked in and I didn't care for the red o-rings for sag, especially with the ring on the fork being slightly faded.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4033.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4026.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4027.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4114.jpg

    Last item was to flip the rear shock to offer better protection of the stanchion.
    Here are some pics of the bike as it currently sits.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4113.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4115.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4116.jpg

    Even with it's monster wheelbase the XL Evolink fits easily into a modern bike bag with the fork flipped. This particular bag is a Douchebags "The Trail"
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4053.jpg

    ...and some riding pictures from San Diego and Lake Tahoe.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3443.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_3773.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4094.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4092.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4077.jpg
    Last edited by ucsbwsr; 09-13-2018 at 07:25 AM.

  19. #19
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    Thanks for sharing!


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    Did those MT5 calipers come with the little plastic rings you can see from the outside already black/grey ? I have the MT7 brake set and not too psyched about the neon yellow color on the caliper "rings".

    Any experiments with the Shimano levers yet ? Running them with Maguras is new to me. I am loving the power of the Maguras but the levers don't feel half as nice as my Saint levers and the feel on the levers is a bit "wooden". Maybe that is what they call modulation by force, but I prefer the feel of "modulation by movement" on the Saints.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preston67 View Post
    Did those MT5 calipers come with the little plastic rings you can see from the outside already black/grey ? I have the MT7 brake set and not too psyched about the neon yellow color on the caliper "rings".

    Any experiments with the Shimano levers yet ? Running them with Maguras is new to me. I am loving the power of the Maguras but the levers don't feel half as nice as my Saint levers and the feel on the levers is a bit "wooden". Maybe that is what they call modulation by force, but I prefer the feel of "modulation by movement" on the Saints.
    Yes, MT5 and MT trail come with the silver rings, thank goodness since I can't stand the yellow. Magura sells replacement rings, search their shop and on Google, they will pop up.

    I have an extra pair of MT5s and a new pair of Shimano M7000 levers for the "Shigura" project. Having ran the M8000s and my current MT5s I am really excited at how these hybrid brakes should feel. I just need to get the correct barb/olive to fit in the Magura hose and Shimano lever. These brakes will be going on my eventual hardtail build so I probably won't build them for a bit. I hope to have my hardtail from Finland in a month or so.

    As for the Magura levers, yes, the stock MT5 levers have a cheap feel with the carbotec (or whatever) construction and poor ergonomics. That is why I bought the MT trail brakes which come with the upgraded aluminum HC trigger-style levers and then swapped the dual piston rear caliper for a quad piston MT5. It took be a couple bleeds to get the brakes set up correctly but they have been AWESOME. I run my levers essentially flat and very close to the bar so they almost touch under hard activation which means there isn't much room error. Power and modulation have been great, the levers are a bit more chunky than the Shimanos but great overall.

    The only downside is the Magura brake pads go pretty quick. I will need to replace my front pads here shortly and I have only been riding the bike for 2 months, granted I weigh 260+ geared up, ride hard, and like gravity but still that's quick wear! I will be replacing the MT5 pads with the MT7s which offer a bit more surface area.

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    oh just did some research I didn't realize you can replace those covers with different colors.

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    You can upgrade the MT7 levers to Magura HC3 levers. They have nice feel and modulation.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preston67 View Post

    Any experiments with the Shimano levers yet ? Running them with Maguras is new to me. I am loving the power of the Maguras but the levers don't feel half as nice as my Saint levers and the feel on the levers is a bit "wooden". Maybe that is what they call modulation by force, but I prefer the feel of "modulation by movement" on the Saints.
    Here is a pic of the levers my MT Trails have, should be the same lever design/contour at the MT7 but with a different leverage ratio, MT7s have a higher ratio than MT5.

    Also regarding your comment about modulation from force vs movement. I usually have pretty mad forearm pump and get tired hands on long downhills. With this new bike I do have some slightly larger grips which should help but I have drastically changed my lever position. Previously on my HTLT which has Shimano M8000 XT with 203mm rotors I ran them more traditionally at a 45 degree downward angle.

    Once switching over to Magura brakes off the bat I definitely noticed the added lever force needed for brake activation. Once the brakes were fully bedded and bled properly I was able to bring the lever reach much closer to the bar to where under light lever actuation it is ~5-6mm from the grip but when I really get on them it can touch the grip. I have also raised the lever angle on the bar little by little and they are almost flat, maybe 5 degree downward, as the levers get flatter it means the contact point moves up your finger towards the base of your finger which essentially means your finger has more leverage on the lever, make sense? I also think this helps modulation since less force is needed.

    Not sure if you will experience the same results as me since I have banana hands and wear XXXXL gloves but it would be something to play around with to see what works for you.

    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4201.jpg

    You can see how flat they are in this photo:
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4113.jpg

    I need some Shimano barbs, olives, and the compression nut and I can give them a whirl!
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4175.jpg

  25. #25
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    Ucsbwsr,

    I think it is pretty clear that your prefer the Pole Evolink to the HTLT. Would you mind sharing what you see are the strengths and weakness of both bikes? I'm a 6'4 200 pounder and I find your insights very helpful. Thanks in advance.
    E


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    - a guy at my local trails (Chicopee / Gainesville, GA) was riding a brand spanking new Evolink today and let me throw a leg over and take it for a spin........VERY NICE - I had been looking at this and the Machine (more bike than I need for sure), and am now considering one very seriously when the car is paid off.......
    Rigid 29er Ti SS / 29er SC Tallboy AL / Paketa Magnesium Road Bike

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ear_ache View Post
    Ucsbwsr,

    I think it is pretty clear that your prefer the Pole Evolink to the HTLT. Would you mind sharing what you see are the strengths and weakness of both bikes? I'm a 6'4 200 pounder and I find your insights very helpful. Thanks in advance.
    E
    Here is the boiled down version, keep in mind this is as the 2 bikes pertain to me and my riding style, location/terrain, and requirements.

    XXL HTLT
    + Extremely supportive pedaling platform
    + Beautiful frame design, fit, and finish
    + Santa Cruz customer support and warranty experience
    + Overall very capable bike
    - Premium brand carries premium price tag
    - Slack seat tube angle
    - VPP not very active, muted small bump sensitivity

    XL Evolink 150
    + Long reach = spacious cockpit
    + Slack H/A helps fork work effectively and aids downhill confidence
    + Long chainstays add grip while climbing and stability descending
    + Steep S/A offers a comfortable upright pedaling position and aids climbing prowess
    + "Pure" suspension kinematics (very little rebound and compression needed)
    + Supple and active suspension aid in grip going up and down
    + Bike geo forces you to ride properly
    - Some might find suspension too active or wish for more pedaling support
    - Evolinks are not a great for weight weenies.
    - Direct sales via Finland can slow down delivery and warranty claims for US customers
    - Evolink aesthetics not as dialed as some other major brands.



    Quote Originally Posted by mr_chrome View Post
    - a guy at my local trails (Chicopee / Gainesville, GA) was riding a brand spanking new Evolink today and let me throw a leg over and take it for a spin........VERY NICE - I had been looking at this and the Machine (more bike than I need for sure), and am now considering one very seriously when the car is paid off.......
    OOOOOOOOh nice, a rare Pole sighting in the wild! Leo alluded that they are working on a shorter travel version of the Machine but the beauty of the Evolink and Machine is that they are so flippin capable and do many things well.

  28. #28
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    Last Sunday I snapped the axle on my Crank Brothers Stamp 3 pedal. What was interesting is it happened while pedaling! I was bombing down a fire road which turned into a gradual uphill so I was pedaling hard to maintain as much momentum as possible and *snap* thankfully no crash or injury resulted from it. Last time I was around a snapped pedal axle it happened to a friend dirt jumping and the axle lacerated his shin to the bone, lots of blood and lots of stitches.

    So -1 point for Crank Brothers for the failure but they earn +1 point for customer service. The pedal snapped on Sunday, I sent an email on Sunday, I had a reply Monday morning, received a shipping label by Monday afternoon, and had new pedals in my possession Wednesday afternoon. They also obliged my request to upgrade the pedals to the Stamp 7 which I did since I suspect they will be stronger with shorter spindles and the pedal face being closer to the crank arm.

    So close yet so far, the trails I was riding to where located amongst the boulders in distant hill.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4213.jpg

    Clean snap!
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4218.jpg

    I had no choice but to go with black
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4282.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4283.jpg

  29. #29
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    Classic Crank Brothers...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  30. #30
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    Thanks for the write up! Nice looking build! I myself am currently trying to decide which Pole to get. It's between the Evolink 158 and the Machine. Not as yet sure. I was also looking at the Geometron G-1 / Nicolai G-1 [same bike]. But I suspect that the ride-feel of the Pole suspension is what I prefer, as I hate any type of platform feeling which is why I really don't care for vpp bikes at all.

    Still not sure what to do but I'll likely go with a small even though I've never had a small before in any bike. I can adjust to an extra 50mm reach, but not 80, as I'm already running a 31mm stem with my current bike which only has 431mm reach. I suppose that going with the Evolink instead of the Machine would save me money should I decide I don't like the longish design as such.

    Do you still like your 150? Is it still holding up well? Any complaints as of late? It's kind of hard to find ANY input on these bikes from any one who isn't affiliated with advertizing / Pole, etc.

    My current bike --Evil Wreckoning-- has to go. I've had enough of the rear linkage utterly packing up to the point of not working so even though I love the bike, it's got to go...as I ride year round and a good three months of the year is very sloppy and wet. No good with my Evil. Looking forward to having plenty of tire and mud clearance again! Actually can't wait to try one of these types of builds!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skrool View Post
    Thanks for the write up! Nice looking build! I myself am currently trying to decide which Pole to get. It's between the Evolink 158 and the Machine. Not as yet sure. I was also looking at the Geometron G-1 / Nicolai G-1 [same bike]. But I suspect that the ride-feel of the Pole suspension is what I prefer, as I hate any type of platform feeling which is why I really don't care for vpp bikes at all.

    Still not sure what to do but I'll likely go with a small even though I've never had a small before in any bike. I can adjust to an extra 50mm reach, but not 80, as I'm already running a 31mm stem with my current bike which only has 431mm reach. I suppose that going with the Evolink instead of the Machine would save me money should I decide I don't like the longish design as such.

    Do you still like your 150? Is it still holding up well? Any complaints as of late? It's kind of hard to find ANY input on these bikes from any one who isn't affiliated with advertising / Pole, etc.

    My current bike --Evil Wreckoning-- has to go. I've had enough of the rear linkage utterly packing up to the point of not working so even though I love the bike, it's got to go...as I ride year round and a good three months of the year is very sloppy and wet. No good with my Evil. Looking forward to having plenty of tire and mud clearance again! Actually can't wait to try one of these types of builds!
    I will be giving an update on my bike in a following post so keep an eye out for that but i short, I am very happy with the bike; a few things to look out for and a few short comings for my abnormal size but the bike RIPS.

    As for Evo vs Machine. If budget allows the Machine sounds like a step up from the Evolink, slightly teak geo and kinematics, lighter weight, "better cornering ability" that Leo claims but can't explain why, and increased cool factor the machined and glued frame. If budget is a consideration then the Evolink should offer 90% of the potential Pole experience but at a more modest (reasonable IMO) price. In the off chance you don't get along with the bike or perhaps order the wrong size then selling either frame in the US shouldn't be too hard, Pole also offers a buy back program which simplifies the swap/upgrade process.

    A note about the Poles which might be similar to the Evil and other multi-link suspension designs is it does go through bearings fairly quickly, a byproduct of active suspension but totally worth it.

    Evan

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ucsbwsr View Post
    I will be giving an update on my bike in a following post so keep an eye out for that but i short, I am very happy with the bike; a few things to look out for and a few short comings for my abnormal size but the bike RIPS.

    As for Evo vs Machine. If budget allows the Machine sounds like a step up from the Evolink, slightly teak geo and kinematics, lighter weight, "better cornering ability" that Leo claims but can't explain why, and increased cool factor the machined and glued frame. If budget is a consideration then the Evolink should offer 90% of the potential Pole experience but at a more modest (reasonable IMO) price. In the off chance you don't get along with the bike or perhaps order the wrong size then selling either frame in the US shouldn't be too hard, Pole also offers a buy back program which simplifies the swap/upgrade process.

    A note about the Poles which might be similar to the Evil and other multi-link suspension designs is it does go through bearings fairly quickly, a byproduct of active suspension but totally worth it.

    Evan
    Looking forward to hearing the next update. I don't mind having to replace bearings if need be, but since I'm a pretty light-weight guy maybe not so much an issue for me. I do like the Machine but the glue-together frame process has not withstood the test of time as yet. Not enough time has passed for anyone to really get an actual feeling for what issues this process may in fact have year in / year out. Maybe they already have gone through some trial / error up to this point and have advanced the process as such. It seems to a degree this has already occurred at least a bit, I say this because I have in fact come across a guy online whose Machine DID in fact come un-glued...and which Pole replaced his frame with a NEW one which right away, and, so far, has not had the same issues. But still, I would not be very pleased about needing to take apart a new build and have to ship it back to Finland etc. . Still....I am considering it anyway. It ends up costing nearly $1,400 more than the Evolink 158, and with not really much of a weight savings to speak of to justify it. But, like you, I have also watched the video where Leo describes how the Machine 'pops' more on-trail... Must be related to the material being used as well as the results of the process itself in terms of how it transfers on-trail. But I suspect maybe the chance is greater that 'I' wouldn't even notice this. I'm pretty quick but I'm no pro and I'm really not much into jumping either. I just like going fast over chunk and steeps. Air is ok if it happens naturally, but I myself really don't care for jump trails in the least. I raced BMX when young and really, for me, mountain biking is more about riding trail than going to parks in order to jump all day long. To each his own.

    As long as my build ends up around 32-33 pounds I'm good with that. I already have nice carbon wheelset and all top components ready to be transferred from my Wreckoning so it should be a nice build no matter which Pole I decide to go with. With the Evolink 158 being so much cheaper cost wise, it's kind of a great way to dive in and see if I like it. I had no idea about the upgrade / swap program with Pole. Very nice to hear!

  33. #33
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    Evolink 140 V1.3 vs 150

    Quote Originally Posted by ucsbwsr View Post
    I will be giving an update on my bike in a following post so keep an eye out for that but i short, I am very happy with the bike; a few things to look out for and a few short comings for my abnormal size but the bike RIPS.

    As for Evo vs Machine. If budget allows the Machine sounds like a step up from the Evolink, slightly teak geo and kinematics, lighter weight, "better cornering ability" that Leo claims but can't explain why, and increased cool factor the machined and glued frame. If budget is a consideration then the Evolink should offer 90% of the potential Pole experience but at a more modest (reasonable IMO) price. In the off chance you don't get along with the bike or perhaps order the wrong size then selling either frame in the US shouldn't be too hard, Pole also offers a buy-back program which simplifies the swap/upgrade process.

    A note about the Poles which might be similar to the Evil and other multi-link suspension designs is it does go through bearings fairly quickly, a byproduct of active suspension but totally worth it.

    Evan
    Great review and feedback!! Your thread has actually tipped me over the line to purchase a Pole. I'm debating between the 140 and 131 and any advice is most appreciated. Since you have the original 150, which travel (F&R) did it have as compared to what the 140 is now? I feel the 140 might be too much travel for my area here on the East Coast (VA) and am actually leaning towards the 131 (Large). Note, I'm 6' 175lbs. Thanks again!

  34. #34
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    Overdue update. Here we go...

    Although I haven't been on the bike as much as I would like (right?) I have put in a fair amount of miles in various terrain including local San Diego trails, lose/chunky/rocky Arizona trails, Lake Tahoe, Monterey and Santa Cruz. I have hopped back on some friend's 27.5+ and 29" carbon Tall Boys to remind me what "normal" bikes are like.

    My deep appreciation for this bike continues. In a nutshell you are "inside" the bike as opposed to "on top" of it which drastically improves confidence descending and grip climbing. The bike does require more rider input to get it to do what you want but as I said earlier I don't find this to be a drawback but rather something that makes riding a more immersive experience. Throwing this biek around is a lot of fun.

    Now this is a big bike with big wheels and on my setup I run 2.5" Maxxis tires with Cushcores and this thing isn't as snappy or quick to accelerate as my friend's carbon TallBoys which is to be expected. So the stability of the Evolink sacrifices some of the lightweight snappiness of a lighter smaller bike. If you ride primarily XC or light duty trail riding then I wouldn't recommend this bike, it's much better suited for aggressive riders who like appreciate a good downhill. This thing is a 160mm downhill bike that pedals extremely well.

    I am very pleased with the suspension, currently I run ~320psi in the rear and 110psi up front which is good for 30% sag. I don't bottom out, the suspension rides pretty high with great support and is EXTREMELY active. The best compliment I can give to the kinematics is "grip." Grip climbing, grip in rough stuff, grip while cornering in ruts and braking bumps. It's great.

    My complaints with the frame are associated with my large size and the low stack of this frame since it's intended for 27.5" wheels and I run 29"
    so take it with a grain of salt. I need more stack and could use another 30+mm of reach. My seat is WAY above the handlebar when climbing and considering the steep seat post angle I feel like tha bars are very close to me even with 535mm of reach. My hands are also noticing the increased load which would likely subside with more stack. I have a new Fox 36 with an uncut steerer tube that I will install and use to test out higher bar positions. On the flipside of the this since the H/A is so slack a longer steerer tube means the higher I go I will be shortening the effective reach and I am not to keen on running a longer stem but such "big person" problems shouldn't be an issue for modest sized individuals.

    The frame has held us great. I haven't had any major crashes but have destroyed some bike parts in typical fashion. The paint is durable and the satin finish ages well with rub marks. The bearings do get a workout and a few months ago when giving the bike a deep clean I noticed some were on the way out. After a very wet ride in Santa Cruz and creaking noise that wouldn't subside I figured it was time to pull the trigger on new bearings. I went with the Enduro Max and so far they are great, the biggest thing I noticed after the frame refresh is the insane amount of grip the backend had on rough surfaces.

    Ok enough talking, if anyone has specific questions feel free to ask. Here are some pictures recapping the past few months with the bike.

    Cheers,
    Evan


    Putting some laps in at La Costa in North County San Diego, one of my favorite local places to ride.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4291.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4293.jpg

    I can't be happier with the Magura brakes they are a great setup for stopping a big boy like me. The downside is they go through pads pretty quick. With the MT5 pads toast I took the opportunity to upgrade to the MT7s, if you look closely you will notice the small increase in pad surface area the MT7s offer, probably ~10% larger. I also ditched the silly little plastic rings and love the cleaner look.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5332.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4305.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_4306.jpg

    Blew up my rear wheel landing a big sideways on a small hip.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5082.jpg

    Wet ride in Santa Cruz with my business partner who was visiting from Hawaii. We own Mountain Road Cycles, in Waimea. RAIL TRAIL!
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5270.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5275.jpg

    Time for fresh bearings
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5314.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5326.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5328.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5327.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5329.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5330.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5331.jpg

    Busted my Ergon saddle, in all fairness it wasn't intended for aggressive MTB use so I was asking a lot from it.

    Notice the aggressive saddle tilt?
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5365.jpg
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5368.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5369.jpg

    I came across a killer deal on a SMC3, if I run into issues I will pony up and get the SME3 Pro since it has SOLID Ti rails.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5427.jpg

    Got a couple days of riding in at Sara Park while visiting family in Lake Havasu. There are some pretty serious trails here. High consequence stuff with loose surfaces, sharp rocks, and some sketchy "don't look down" sections. Some of the best riding I have experienced. The website wouldn't let me upload all of them unfortunately.
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5461.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5462.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_0410.jpgPole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5463.jpg

  35. #35
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    Thank you very much for your report, it is very useful.
    You do not recommend bike for a longer trail riding, is it just because of the weight ?
    Thanks

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by NARANCA View Post
    Thank you very much for your report, it is very useful.
    You do not recommend bike for a longer trail riding, is it just because of the weight ?
    Thanks
    I don't recall ever not recommending this bike for long trail riding, if it came across that way it wasn't my intent. I recommend this bike for all people to try if possible and draw their own conclusions, there might be people who don't prefer the way it rides but the main benefits of this frame design in excellent grip climbing and confidence descending is hard to deny regardless of subjective preference.

    I think for one bike to do it all this is hard to beat, the combination of climbing grip and speed descending is impressive. Other bikes need trick systems like Scott's TwinLoc to be even considered to have the same capability (IMO), I think it's great Pole does it the analog way with geometry and not bespoke adaptive suspension.

    Regarding weight, it does play a hand in riding dynamics and the bikes character but personally I view it as a bonus rather than a high priority. Again, my perspective is a bit unique given my size, weight, and leg power. If a bike is heavier I view it as an opportunity to get stronger; heavier bike = better workout. If I was a World Cup racer or 70 years old, or rehabilitating from a serious injury my outlook might be different and shaving grams to maximize efficiency would be more of a consideration.

    Referencing an earlier post in my thread you can see the Evolink was 1.4lbs heavier than my carbon XXL Hightower LT with a similar "heavy duty" build which isn't a big difference IMO. If weight is a concern then another thing to examine is where the weight is, the Evolink has a pretty tidy frame design and a lot of the weight from the shock, links, and hardware is low and in the center of the bike right around the cranke which is the best place it could be.

    Evan

  37. #37
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    I found a BNIB 150mm Fox 36 (Grip 1) for a great price and picked it up for my eventual hardtail build but in the meantime I decided to throw it on the Evolink to test out the performance and play around with stack height on the uncut steerer tube. My previous Fox 36 was with a 2018 Fit 4 and I wasn't terribly impressed.

    The plan was to get a Grip 2 damper for this new fork all along but having no real trail time of the Grip 1 damper I wanted to experience it a bit prior to upgrading. For the price it feels great, better than my Fit 4.

    160mm Lyrik
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5491.jpg

    150mm Fox 36
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_5492.jpg

    Met up an old acquaintance that has gotten into biking after finishing his volleyball career. 6'7" and 6'8" respectively, big guys on big bikes. XXL Sentinel and Xl Evolink. Fun stuff
    Pole Evolink 150:  Build/Ride Log-img_e1963.jpg

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