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  1. #1
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    Pedal Strikes?

    I have a Redline Monocog Flight and I seem to be getting a lot of pedal strikes. I don't seem to get them on my 26" bikes, is this a problem that 29ers have or is it just this bike? I was thinking of getting another 29er, is there another bike I should try that doesn't have this issue.

  2. #2
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    change the way you ride. its not the bikes fault...

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    Quote Originally Posted by hondachevy
    I have a Redline Monocog Flight and I seem to be getting a lot of pedal strikes. I don't seem to get them on my 26" bikes, is this a problem that 29ers have or is it just this bike? I was thinking of getting another 29er, is there another bike I should try that doesn't have this issue.
    Could be your bike. A buddy of mine recently got a Cannondale 29er that has a similar problem. I've ridden it and gotten lots of pedal strikes as well. Turns out the bottom bracket is a bit on the low side. I believe that the low bottom bracket helps to put the rider more "in" the frame and makes that bike handle really well (it feels much better than my Niner). However, the tradeoff is being lower to the ground and more pedal strikes. I've heard this same complaint from other folks with the carbon version of that frame - however, never heard about this with the Monocog.

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    if you are getting pedal strikes on a hardtail it's pretty much a technique thing. I get occasional strikes on my RIP9 - primarily when cranking through technical terrain when the bike squats down and I mis-time my pedal stroke.

    edit: as dtownmtb state - check the BB height. I sort of assumed you had already accounted for differences between the Monocog and your old bike.
    Vecsus

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    The BB height is about an inch lower then the 26ers I have, that and the pedals are thicker. I do pedal the Mono more, being a SS and all. So my technique could be modified, but the crank is lower. Do all 29er frames have lower BB like this? Niner brand bikes have a higher BB? How do they handle?

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    lots of 29ers are built around less fork travel than 26ers as well in order to keep the stand over low. this means that a 26er with a longer travel fork is going to have a higher bb to allow for crank clearance when the fork is fully compressed.
    this could be part of the reason why your 29er has a lower bb, though with a little practice it really wont be an issue, just ride through it!

  7. #7
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    Agreed

    Quote Originally Posted by jlesser
    change the way you ride. its not the bikes fault...
    A low bottom bracket gives you killer handling. Pedal strikes are a small price to pay, especially considering it's easily solved.

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    Taller (bigger) tires can help, but I'd stay with it low.

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    I've experienced the exact opposite. My 26'' specialized was horrendous for peddle strikes, and i hated it. When i bought my Haro Mary xc 29er a few months ago the peddle strikes have disappeared for the most part. Im also very comfortable on the bike and believe im faster and more in control.

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    Clipless pedals may help since they are much smaller than platforms.
    Matt

  11. #11
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    bottom bracket height is entirely up to the bike designer and is not limited by wheel size. Certain brands really tend to run on the low side, such as Specialized, while others tend to run taller. My Inbred currently has a 13.4" bb

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    Pedal strikes are only solveable without longer forks or a new frame by stopping pedalling through rough stuff, or not riding rough stuff.

    I hate low BB's why I generally run forks longer than I should, it'll raise the BB by approx 35% of what you add on the forks.

    New frame might be the answer though sadly for where you ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TunicaTrails
    Taller (bigger) tires can help, but I'd stay with it low.
    Good advice. Tire made a big difference on my HiFi.

  14. #14
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    I just measured my Redline Monocog 29er and three 26ers. The Monocog's BB height is .5 to 1.25 inches higher than the 26ers.

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    Pedals, cranks and technique

    If you use platforms, you could switch to a thinner profile platform pedal like Kona Wah Wah's

    Also, another factor is the crank arm length.

    I think the reason for the pedal strikes is the difference between riding single speed and geared.

    When you are in a low gear (geared bike), you have more options to time a pedal stroke, or ratchet the crank to avoid a rock.

    When you are single speeding, it is tough to ratchet the crank because you lose your momentum.

  16. #16
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    My '07 MCR9 with old rigid fork is right at about 12". I rather enjoy the extra clearance (compared to the old StumpJumper), but if it was any higher I think I would feel like it was too high. While I do have an occasional pedal strike, it's not a recurring theme. Usu. it happens when I'm cranking out of an off-camber turn where I don't want to lose momentum.
    I think the new Niner geo. drops it about 3/8" to 11-5/8", but not sure.

    -F

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    My previous rigid frame wasn't mean for suspension forks so the 100mm rigid corrected forks + 29" wheel really raised the BB since swapping the frame to a 456 I think this makes the bike less nimble more stable at the same time but I miss the nimble!!

    I don't miss not being able to reach the floor while seated though.

  18. #18
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    I run a bike with a BB about 10 mm lower than any commercial option (75mm of drop) and I tag a pedal about once every few rides. Buy a bike that matches your style or learn how to ride the bike you bought.

  19. #19
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    The Monocog Flight carves very well - pedal strikes are mostly a technique issue - you need to me more in tune with pedal location when you're focused on maintaining momentum on the single speed. I run 180mm cranks on my Flight and only get a pedal strike every once in a while.
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

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    huh, not much mention of crank length? I get the occasional strike with the VooDoo running 175mm cranks but get less on the misfit with 170mm cranks. And agreed, technique is a big factor too....and what everyone else said about BB height.

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    got the same on my new stumpy with a plush fork setup after some 26 bikes with a bit oversized forks,
    I'm going to change rebas' travel from 90mm to 100mm to solve it, cuz 73.5 seat tube angle and low bb just screams to do so.
    but i have to admit it handles extremely well right now.
    of course you can pump some more air to the fork to shorten the sag,
    but you can clearly see on the pictures of the bikes that specialized and aluminum cannondales have much lower bb's than other bikes around.

    strange thing is that carbon cannondales have a much!!! higher bb than alu ones (take a side photo and draw a straight line between the axles in "paintbrush" for example), but the geo specs are the same.

    gt zaskar specs a big bb drop (even lower bb, than cannondale and stumpy), but you can not see it on pics (yes it has a 100mm fork and it sags a bit more, but the difference i'am talking about is huge!)

    ps: am thinking about a niner (stumpy is a bit too long for me). it seems to have a higher bb, but i just did not find any straight side picture of it yet with any popular susp fork (just curios).

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    I have a Salsa Mamasita and one of the things I like about it over the 26er's I have ridden is the lack of pedal strikes on the Mamasita compared to 26er's. I guess every bike is a little different. My Mamasita pedal strikes have never been an issue.

  23. #23
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    I'm still amazed at these responses. Raise the BB with a longer fork? Shorter cranks? Come on! You're gonna buy what, 5mm, 10mm tops? They all seem like weaksauce solutions to me.

    I still think the real issue is learning how to pedal over rough stuff, ratcheting, etc. You're never going to be able to buy 'inches' of clearance.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I'm still amazed at these responses. Raise the BB with a longer fork? Shorter cranks? Come on! You're gonna buy what, 5mm, 10mm tops? They all seem like weaksauce solutions to me.

    I still think the real issue is learning how to pedal over rough stuff, ratcheting, etc. You're never going to be able to buy 'inches' of clearance.
    yes! 10mm longer fork will rise bb about 4mm.
    yes! rider skills can do it all.
    no! bikes are different a lot, they are whatever you say.
    incheS? no, but look at the Fisher and a stumpy - put the same fork on them and you'll get that single inch

    ps: shorter cranks looks like something a bit too radical

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    Any El Mariachi riders have this problem?

  26. #26
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    Learn to ratchet and plan ahead. Also, skinny platforms like the Wah Wahs and the Azonic 420s help quite a bit. I ride the Azonics and get fewer than I did with my Sun Ringles A lot cheaper than buying new bikes, cranks, forks...

  27. #27
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    Random input here, but unless one actually sees these things, they sound urban legendy in nature - hard to believe....

    Two identical bikes apparently can have significantly different clearance on the BB. Rider in the area had a brand new bike, kept hitting his pedals, getting really gun-shy about riding after a few weeks/months. One day he is beside a rider with the exact same bike - and the frames look off. So when they line them up side by side, the BB on his is 1.5" lower! Same bike - year, model, frame size, everything. LBS made lots of attempts to fix, but gave up for a new frame order.

    True story - too weird to make it up. I almost bought that bike too. Would have driven me crazy to diagnosis....

    I say all this to the OP just to cover this base....
    2010 Fuji Tahoe 29 SL - bike # 6 in the clydesdale torture test lab

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I'm still amazed at these responses. Raise the BB with a longer fork? Shorter cranks? Come on! You're gonna buy what, 5mm, 10mm tops? They all seem like weaksauce solutions to me.

    I still think the real issue is learning how to pedal over rough stuff, ratcheting, etc. You're never going to be able to buy 'inches' of clearance.
    I agree here.

    While I can pedal over more things with a slightly higher BB, there are still just as many things to hook pedals on as there were before, so it's not by accident that I am missing them.

    Push a bigger gear so you don't have to pedal so much.

    Really, once you get a better feel for how to conserve your momentum, you won't have to pedal at those inopportune moments - you'll have enough mo' to ratchet pedal, back-pedal, coast uphill (to a degree), pump the backsides of hills and trannys, pinball off tree stumps, and pick up speed just by steering correctly and picking clean lines. (pssst - it's all in the Lopes book)
    Really.

    -F

  29. #29
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    meh, you guys come try these uphill rock gardens. It's not that I don't know how to ratchet properly, it's that I find it a lot harder to keep my uphill momentum going on an SS when I have to pause and ratchet all the time. I agree that slight changes aren't likely that noticeable , my setup is over an inch and a half taller in the BB than some similar bikes and it makes a huge difference in my ability to just keep the cranks spinning without worry. Heck, it made offroad fixie almost easy because i didn't have to learn special tricks to move the cranks

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbebeau
    True story - too weird to make it up. I almost bought that bike too. Would have driven me crazy to diagnosis....
    can you name it?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I'm still amazed at these responses. Raise the BB with a longer fork? Shorter cranks? Come on! You're gonna buy what, 5mm, 10mm tops? They all seem like weaksauce solutions to me.
    Even that 5 or 10 mm can make a difference. My alu 26er HT is pretty low, and I've never had so many pedal strikes as when I had some "regular" thickness flat pedals on it for a while.

    I've mainly been riding trails on slightly taller bikes (10 mm maybe) and, when I went for the lower bike for a while, I was hitting everything.

    Adjusting the riding style to a different bike takes a while. Whatever bike I ride, I end up ratcheting somewhere during a ride.

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    Agreed. Yes, proper form is probably the bigger (biggest?) issue, but in my experience, 5-10mm in the wrong (or right) place can make or break fit/comfort on a bike. Also agree with boomn, but we got more uphill root-gardens that'll get ya. It's good for noobs (and those who no longer call themselves noobs) to see the different perspectives.

    But in the end, this is the height of "riding season"! Can't we all just get along and not get our panties in a bunch about other peeps opinions?


    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    Even that 5 or 10 mm can make a difference. My alu 26er HT is pretty low, and I've never had so many pedal strikes as when I had some "regular" thickness flat pedals on it for a while.

    I've mainly been riding trails on slightly taller bikes (10 mm maybe) and, when I went for the lower bike for a while, I was hitting everything.

    Adjusting the riding style to a different bike takes a while. Whatever bike I ride, I end up ratcheting somewhere during a ride.

  33. #33
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    Looking at different published 29er bike 'bottom bracket drop' specs there seems to be a pretty small range that they work in. Small like 10mm, or less then half an inch. Draw your own conclusion but I guess I need to pay more attention to where the rocks are, a different bike won't make a substantial difference.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by hondachevy
    Looking at different published 29er bike 'bottom bracket drop' specs there seems to be a pretty small range that they work in. Small like 10mm, or less then half an inch. Draw your own conclusion but I guess I need to pay more attention to where the rocks are, a different bike won't make a substantial difference.
    Specialized sells bikes with bb height as low as 11.7" with a stock 80mm fork and there are a number of frames that are a good bit over 13" with a 100mm fork (mine is 13.4"). That's quite a difference to me.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vecsus
    if you are getting pedal strikes on a hardtail it's pretty much a technique thing. I get occasional strikes on my RIP9 - primarily when cranking through technical terrain when the bike squats down and I mis-time my pedal stroke.

    edit: as dtownmtb state - check the BB height. I sort of assumed you had already accounted for differences between the Monocog and your old bike.
    Ditto, with practice, it's avoidable.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raskladnoy
    can you name it?
    The bike - yes... it was a 2008 DB Sortie 3 XL frame. It is a FS bike, but that issue (any suspension sag) was taken into account (both front and rear shocks were rebuilt before the LBS gave up and ordered a new frame).
    2010 Fuji Tahoe 29 SL - bike # 6 in the clydesdale torture test lab

  37. #37
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    i would get a new bike, preferably Ti

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i would get a new bike, preferably Ti
    absolutely; the pedal strikes are more compliant on Ti

  39. #39
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    Heh heh ... I love these guys that make the pedal strikes your fault. I'm more than happy to blame the bike. You had a BB height that worked for you on your previous bike, and now you don't. An inch is a huge difference.

    It's a tradeoff, and ultimately it's just a matter of personal preference, not some moral judgment about how YOU need to change YOUR technique and you're just a crappy rider who needs more practice. GMAFB. Low BB height = tighter handling, more pedal strikes, easier to get on and off the bike. High BB height = slower handling, FAR fewer pedal strikes, a little harder to get on and off the bike.

    Personally, I like a high BB so I can keep pedaling through rock gardens and other uneven terrain. My Vulture has an EBB and I usually have it set near the top, putting the BBH at around 12.3" IIRC. I'm short enough that the higher center of gravity is not really a problem. The low BB (about 1/2" lower - very big diff IME) was one of the things I most hated about my Karate Monkey and the primary reason I didn't replace it with the same model. The problem wasn't just pedal strikes but also chainring strikes (also a bit of a problem on my Lev).

    Heck, I even prefer a high BB on my commuter bike so I can pedal around even tight corners without a care. My commuter is an old 26"er converted to 700c, which puts the BB at just over 12". LOVE it!
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  40. #40
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    I changed my pedals to some 520's and that helped a lot. I think more practice will help me avoid the strikes. What I'm really having a hard time with now is how much more fun it is riding my Monocog Flight rather then my much more(MUCH, MUCH MORE) expensive FS 26er... Live and learn...

  41. #41
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    Man, you guys are completely inspiring me to reassemble my 737 (75mm BB drop). It's on!

  42. #42
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    me too....


    Quote Originally Posted by hondachevy
    What I'm really having a hard time with now is how much more fun it is riding my Monocog Flight rather then my much more(MUCH, MUCH MORE) expensive FS 26er... Live and learn...

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