Paragon sliding dropouts - anyone have experience with 'em?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    New question here. Paragon sliding dropouts - anyone have experience with 'em?

    Hi,

    I'm looking to have a steel 29er built and I want to be able to run it SS or geared (with disc brakes). I know about the EBB option but I was wondering if the Paragon sliders work well (see attached pic). Anyone have experience with these (builder or owner)? Is there any other sliding dropout option that accomodates disc brakes and can run SS or geared without an EBB?

    Thanks for your help.
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  2. #2
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    Yep, got 'em and love 'em

    I own a Mooto X, w/ sliders, and my friend had a custom steel Pereira w/ them too. They haven't been used on bikes for that long, (some of the Konas may have had them before this year) so I don't know if anyone can give you a long term review, but here's my review so far. I had heard from most of my friends running EBB, that they had to check tightness on a regular basis, and one guy had it come loose during an endurance race. (Not good!) So I wanted something better, lighter and requiring less maintenance. I believe the slider meets the criteria. I also wanted to have the clean SS dropout when I wasn't running gears. It's an awesome (and simple) concept that works beautifully. I can switch between SS/ gears in less than 5 minutes including chain,shifter (XO), cable and housing (leave it attached and slide it out of the guides), dropout/derailler and geared wheel. I haven't had any slippage of the dropout or loosening of the hardware. Tons of different builders are using some version of it (Kona, Seven, Moots and a plethora of smaller builders) I have a feeling, they've done their research. My friend has had no problems w/ his either. Once you see it and use it , it becomes one of those "why didn't I think of that?" items. Really. Go for it.

  3. #3
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    My friend runs them on all of his custom frames and loves them. I think they are quality!

  4. #4
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    Paragon=Quality.

    The SDO and the EBB both have their followings, along with those that think they are just plain stupid. Funny how that always seems to be the trend in the bike industry

    However for your requirements I think SDO's would work just fine, I just speced them on a build and they sure look fine although I haven't finished the build to give a report on how well they hold up over the long term.

    The Paragon SDO's in Ti



    And in Steel.

    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

  5. #5
    And He was Not
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    I've had the Kona sliders, and I currently have the Paragon sliders.I prefer EBB. I change rear gears alot, the EBB is quicker, and simple.
    The Truth is out there. Here it isThe TRUTH

  6. #6
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Warning, tangent!

    I really dig the design of the Paragon sliders, but coming from the mind of a non-engineer, non-physicist, does it seem like there are a lot of forces acting upon the inner tab piece that fits into the slider (where the set screws go into)?

    Which leads me to another question. When new stuff like this comes out, do bike companies do their finite element analysis voodoo*, or is a lot of it designed up, overbuilt, then trail tested until something goes wrong? I guess that's what insurance is for.

    BTW, I thought this was a cool design when Weather first threw it up on the boards 1.5 years ago. I wonder why I've never seen it thereafter (or have I not been paying close enough attention)?



    *It's voodoo to me since I don't understand a lick of it.
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  7. #7
    Needed Less ~ Did More
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drevil
    I really dig the design of the Paragon sliders, but coming from the mind of a non-engineer, non-physicist, does it seem like there are a lot of forces acting upon the inner tab piece that fits into the slider (where the set screws go into)?

    Which leads me to another question. When new stuff like this comes out, do bike companies do their finite element analysis voodoo*, or is a lot of it designed up, overbuilt, then trail tested until something goes wrong? I guess that's what insurance is for.

    BTW, I thought this was a cool design when Weather first threw it up on the boards 1.5 years ago. I wonder why I've never seen it thereafter (or have I not been paying close enough attention)?



    *It's voodoo to me since I don't understand a lick of it.
    I'll wade in on this one

    I'm not sure what Mark at Paragon does re: the design and testing side but speaking as an engineer and physics bod I would say that the Paragons are way over built for normal XC stuff. The guff about "adding leverage" is not really a problem if the frame is built well (remember the old cannondale drop-outs) and as for the "flimsy" part...we'll those people have never picked one up or seen it in real life!

    The set-screw is stainless and threads into a stainless body with 10mm+ thread engagement. The lugs on the alu sliding bits take the leverage off the 2 dome headed bolts who just stop it rattling about when the wheels out

    The drop out in the picture is from the Whyte 19 and looks a pretty neat solution but it still relys on the friction between the frame and drop-out, all clamped up by two small, short bolts threaded in to Alu....not a great solution but it seems to work. Whyte has some interesting solutions on their bikes....

    Alex
    "Put any one on one of these singlespeed bikes and they could not help but have fun"
    -
    Otis Guy talking about klunkers c1976

  8. #8
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    Does.....

    Anybody happen to have a somewhat close-up picture of a disc wheel mounted up in a frame?
    I'm just wondering what the caliper adjustment is like. I guess it bolts to the outside of the slider?

    Thanx.

  9. #9
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    Brake pics

    Quote Originally Posted by DMFT
    Anybody happen to have a somewhat close-up picture of a disc wheel mounted up in a frame?
    I'm just wondering what the caliper adjustment is like. I guess it bolts to the outside of the slider?

    Thanx.
    Ck out my posting when I built my bike shows a closeup of the brake side slider. It bolts on the inside of the slider.
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    Last edited by tibiker325; 02-10-2006 at 09:24 PM.

  10. #10
    And He was Not
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMFT
    Anybody happen to have a somewhat close-up picture of a disc wheel mounted up in a frame?
    I'm just wondering what the caliper adjustment is like. I guess it bolts to the outside of the slider?

    Thanx.
    Here ya' go
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    The Truth is out there. Here it isThe TRUTH

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