One bike for New England and BC?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    One bike for New England and BC?

    This is somewhat of a thought exercise since I'm not buying a new bike anytime soon, but I'd appreciate opinions for future reference.

    I live in New England and ride mainly local trails and XC stuff. Typical NE riding - punchy ups and downs, rocky, rooty, etc. I do an occasional Xterra tri or local XC race, as well as the occasional lift-access park or downhill, but I mainly ride local trails for fun. I currently ride an aluminum 2018 YT Jeffsy 29 which I love, but I could definitely get away with a little less travel and would probably benefit from something that's a little lighter and climbs a little better.

    A couple buddies and I are planning to do the BC Bike Race in 2021, and I will probably buy a new bike leading into that. If you could have one bike that will handle both situations reasonably well, knowing that it's primary use will be non-competitive trail riding, what would it be?

    I'm thinking of bikes like SC Tallboy, Pivot Trail 429, Giant Trance 29, and Intense Sniper Trail. What else would be on your list?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    How about the Forbidden Druid?

  3. #3
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
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    Ibis Ripley, Kona Process 134, IDK, you basically asked for a list of every mid travel trail bike on the market.

    Prioritize... climbing efficiency, descending ability, or short chainstay fun factor, jumping, etc. There's always a tradeoff.

    I try to prioritize based on where I'm going to spend the most time on my bike. Locally obviously. I much prefer a hardtail or very efficient FS bike locally, but when I go out of town and ride terrain with more elevation and bigger features I need a bike that's more capable.

    I love racing but I spend 95% of my time on the bike riding for fun so I don't set up my primary bikes for "race mode".

    Likewise you can own/ride a great all-rounder and just swap tires as necessary based on your personal adventures.
    Rigid SS 29er
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    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  4. #4
    There's always next year.
    Reputation: padrefan1982's Avatar
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    Just my opinion; I wouldn't let BCBR factor much into your final decision bike. From my experience (completed it twice) unless you are one of guys battling at the front, bike selection won't make or break you. Pick up the bike that works well in your area, that you are comfortable on (for multiple hours), and BCBR will take care of itself--I've pretty much every genre (short of a dual-crown DH bike) of MTB bike there in my two experiences. I don't know if that helps--but I wouldn't want "BCBR or not" to infringe on your bike selection process. Its hard enough as is to pick out 'the right one.'

  5. #5
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    BC is where the RockyMountain element was borned.
    It is a versatile bike so take a look possibly borrow 1 or rent for a real test.
    With the versatile(adjustable) frame you can dial according to the day planned.
    bikes.com

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by padrefan1982 View Post
    Just my opinion; I wouldn't let BCBR factor much into your final decision bike. From my experience (completed it twice) unless you are one of guys battling at the front, bike selection won't make or break you. Pick up the bike that works well in your area, that you are comfortable on (for multiple hours), and BCBR will take care of itself--I've pretty much every genre (short of a dual-crown DH bike) of MTB bike there in my two experiences. I don't know if that helps--but I wouldn't want "BCBR or not" to infringe on your bike selection process. Its hard enough as is to pick out 'the right one.'
    Fair enough, I appreciate the input from someone who has raced it. I definitely will not be battling at the front, it will be purely for fun and to complete it.

  7. #7
    I live to bike
    Reputation: Jwiffle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by padrefan1982 View Post
    Just my opinion; I wouldn't let BCBR factor much into your final decision bike. From my experience (completed it twice) unless you are one of guys battling at the front, bike selection won't make or break you. Pick up the bike that works well in your area, that you are comfortable on (for multiple hours), and BCBR will take care of itself--I've pretty much every genre (short of a dual-crown DH bike) of MTB bike there in my two experiences. I don't know if that helps--but I wouldn't want "BCBR or not" to infringe on your bike selection process. Its hard enough as is to pick out 'the right one.'
    I think padrefan1982's advice is spot-on. Get a bike that will be for what you ride, where you ride. A one-off race that you aren't even going to be competitive in isn't worth buying a bike around.

    I'm building a new bike myself. A bit more bike than I need, and definitely over built for the one endurance race I do most years. If I purchased based on that race, I'd have a bike that was awesome for race day, but would not be what I wanted the other 364 days. Since I'm not at the front of the race, I just take the bike I have and have a good time.
    Stop in at Element Sports. www.elementsport.com
    Get Out! Have Fun!

  8. #8
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    Here in the Mid-Atlantic, my friend has an Ibis 2019 Ripmo and 2020 Ripley. He says the Ripley is by far the best all around bike he has owned. It is light, fast, nimble, efficient in the climbs, and handles moderate rough terrain like a champ. The Ripley is now his go to bike for the local terrain and is crushing his PRs.

  9. #9
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    The Intense Sniper Trail is a really nice XC bike. The "Trail" description is a bit misleading with 120/120mm travel a notch under what most folks would call a trail bike. It's really light and beautifully constructed, but if you're willing to add 1-2 pounds an Intense Primer (140/130) is a better fit for rugged NE trail riding. My buddy has the Sniper Trail and I have a 2018 Primer. We ride mostly in Western Mass. where roots and rocks abound and very little is flat. His bike goes uphill with a little less effort but the Primer makes the narrow, twisty, chattery downhills more smooth sailing for me.

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