The next big thing in bike materials?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Missouri sucks...
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    The next big thing in bike materials?

    Read an article about it in one of my car magazines and immediately thought of my 29er I see this being good for bikes due to shorter/cheaper manufacturing costs. It doesn't sound as compliant as typical carbon fiber but for areas where stiffness and weight are high priority(cranks, brake levers, etc.) this sounds awesome! Hell, I can see carbon brake calipers, hubs, rims and such becoming the norm in the next 5-10 years since you don't have to lay down an actual weave. If they can injection mold this stuff there wouldn't be any limit to what they could do with it in the bike industry The new Lamborghini that's in the works even uses the stuff in the suspension components I'm pretty excited to say the least...

    http://www.callawaygolf.com/Global/e...echnology.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forged_composite

  2. #2
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    yay more plastic bikes.... is this environmentally friendly?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mellowme17
    yay more plastic bikes.... is this environmentally friendly?
    Not really. Lots of semi-toxic waste in that process.
    Vecsus

    HTFU or STFU

  4. #4
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    I saw that awhile back too with the new Lambo... I also wondered about bikes. I also wondered how much different it actually is. Seems like everyone that does carbon is constantly touting what they did to make their carbon so much better than everyone elses.

  5. #5
    beer is good
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vecsus
    Not really. Lots of semi-toxic waste in that process.
    Yeah.... I'm sure there are no semi- toxic wastes in using aluminum
    Steve
    "looking California, feeling Minnesota"

  6. #6
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    dalekanium

  7. #7
    29 TO LIFE
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    Sounds familiar

    The process reminds me of carbon thermoplastic without the wet injection process. Chopped up carbon and resin. GT used it on the LTS once. Could be good. Less room for error in manufacturing and more consistent wall thickness. Maybe even a one piece carbon frame if they use a lost wax mold or something similar. But if Callaway and Lambo are behind it it will be uber expensive.

  8. #8
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    unobtanium

  9. #9
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    I think this is similar to the process Magura describes for their latest and greatest brakes:
    http://www.mission-performance.com/en/start.html

  10. #10
    1*14*29*2.1 & 1*1*29*2.4
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    looks to me just another way to use carbon fibre. They may chop it finely and mould it under pressure with who knows what, but I can't see anything truly radical. Good for small components but I doubt would match the strength of uni directional/continuous strand carbon in structual members.

  11. #11
    Missouri sucks...
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    Quote Originally Posted by nspace
    I think this is similar to the process Magura describes for their latest and greatest brakes:
    http://www.mission-performance.com/en/start.html
    That's what excited me about the process! I hadn't seen those brakes yet but something like that using conventional carbon layup methods was probably doable before but the new process is much faster and more financially feasible. Lamborghini stated that the new process takes 1/8 the time to produce a part than the old method That will make carbon parts much more common and hopefully drive the price down for us lay folk. It'd be completely awesome if the U.S. could reclaim some carbon production but I doubt it. Looks like Germany and Italy have a head start this time around...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmitch2
    unobtanium
    Dude, we lost the battle for Pandora and the supply of unobtanium...watch the movie

  13. #13
    Cassoulet forever !
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    Your are late to the party.

    short fibers composite are called SMC. They are already used in the bike industry, for example by BMC, or Duchesne (the Mavic contractor for carbon stuff)
    Frenchspeaking 29"ers community site http://VingtNeuf.org

  14. #14
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    doesnt bmc like have this huge stargate thing with carbon spools around it! now thats cool!

    http://www.bmc-racing.com/us-en/impec/technologies.html

  15. #15
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    lead

  16. #16
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    Fiber / carbon reinforced polymers have been used for structural stuff for decades now. Just like any material, there are some applications it's better for... some that it is horrible for. Right now,my company uses some for two reasons:
    1. The stuff we use is non-conductive, so it is a great insulator in our high-amp products (1500-7000amps)
    2. It's roughly 6-times easier to work with in the CNC's. Much less maint on the machines = cheaper to work with.
    3. It's just as strong as fiberglass plate at half the thickness and 1/3 the weight. 15% cheaper by volume.

    This is more of an evolutionary, not revolutionary step. It's a polymer with suspended carbon nanotubes in it. The biggest cost in this product is the production of carbon nanotubes. Right now, MIT is working on nano-tech that will automate the build process of carbon-based nanotubes thus bringing down the cost of raw material in the future.

    If you look at the application of this new-ish material in Callaway / Lambo's products... they are using small amounts. Cost is a major reason. We will see the stuff on bikes with high-end components in 5-7 years. But frames will be much farther out.

    I see the best application for this material in the short term:
    1. Spokes - easiest to produce.
    2. Rims - Forged single-walled rims stronger and lighter than double-wall AL.
    3. Crank Arms - lighter / stiffer combination that what we have to choose from now.

    And remember... the amount of R&D in steel and aluminium is off the charts. The good old materials aren't going away... if anything, they will bridge the gap in 10 years.

  17. #17
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    Bamboo/hemp is getting more popular and better designed. That'll make this treehugger happy.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmmorath
    Bamboo/hemp is getting more popular and better designed. That'll make this treehugger happy.

    I rode a bamboo bike at the Tour de Fat this year, and was very impressed with the weight, the strength, and the ride. I'd buy one of those before I'd even look at one of them newfangled Carpet Fiber frames.

  19. #19
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    Carbon nano-tubes.

    WDR

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