New GT Avalanche Elite 29" - too heavy?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    193

    New GT Avalanche Elite 29" - too heavy?

    Hi!
    I've got GT Avalanche Elite 29" (2018) in size L today(https://www.gtbicycles.com/aus_en/avalanche-elite-1456) as a replacement for another bike with cracked frame. This is my first 29", it fits me OK, the level of components is mostly OKish, and I'm actually interested to try 29er.

    I've got a surprise when I had it on the scales - 15.3kg! OK, I can take all the reflectors, bell and such off, replace the platform pedals it came with with old M520s. This is quick, does not require any expences, but all it might get me is a saving of ~300g - tops.

    I appreciate that everything's bigger(heavier) for 29er comparing to 26" bikes I'm riding - the wheels, the tyres, the frame, the cassette, the forks, and the cables and hoses are longer :-). I suspect the main culprits in my case are the Suntour XCR forks, bottom bracket, and probably the wheels.

    So, how common is this kind of weight for XC 29er hardtail (15.3kg = 33.7lbs) ? Is there some sort of rule of thumb that 29" bike might weight Xkg more than equivalent 26" bike?
    Regards,
    Last edited by nampla; 07-18-2018 at 02:39 AM.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator SuperModerator
    Reputation: driver bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    4,166
    It's 90% down to component weight, there'a a member here who built a 13lb Niner (Matt Kock)

    I've had a Niner and a Blacksheep and both were 19lbs.

    Wheels and tires are were you'll see the best benefit from weight saving.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    13,353
    Lightweight costs. That fork is 5.5lbs. You can lose 1-1/2lbs. with a better fork. Weigh your wheels and tires/tubes. You can drop weight there for money. 25lbs. is the weight I like a 29 hardtail. Of course carbon frame but that's another bike. Scott Scales are light in aluminum.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    193
    Thanks for the replies! I am OK with spending on upgrades, I am just trying to figure out if this is a wise thing to do for this particular bike.
    I got the bike as a warranty replacement for a very old cracked frame. I was looking for a new hardtail anyways, but do not think I'd buy GT Avalanche for cash - would probably get something like Merida Big.Nine XT Edition (BIG.NINE XT-EDITION - MTB HARDTAIL - Merida Bikes Australia), which is ~AUD600 more and claims to be 12.2kg (27lbs).

    I have three routes - 1 Ride it as it is and eventually upgrade 2 Upgrade now, sell the new parts (not sure if it's possible with most of them) and keep the bike 3 Sell it and buy something else.

    So, what I'm deciding now, if upgrading the Avalanche is worth of time, money and effort, and if the frame is light and strong enough

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2,093
    When you're ready, sell the whole thing and get a completely different bike. You will be swapping pretty much everything out eventually, and you'll end up building a new bike from scratch part by part, and pay a lot more than you would for a complete bike. Even though your frame is decent, a cheap chinese carbon frame would be a LOT lighter.

    Ride this one while shopping for a good used replacement, look for a 2 to even 5 year old bike with lower miles and you should be able to find a great deal. There are some good buys on new bikes, those would be 'mail-order', Canyon is a good one to look at, but you should be able to find a 25 pound (11.4kilo) bike in great shape for $1,000 US.
    skidding is the signature of the novice; learn how to use your brakes.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    1,123
    Just ride it. See how you like 29ers. It isn't a great spec, but it isn't horrible either. Most frame weights are quoted for a M frame, so that's probably kind of average for that level of bike, ie, around 30lbs, 14kg, with the bigger frames getting a little porkier.

    If you like the frame geometry and whatnot, you can probably lose the weight and upgrade quite a few things (fork, 1x, wheels, tubeless, etc.) over time as the need/desire/budget arises.

    Although I suppose a case can be made for selling it and buying something else, too. Both of these would seem to be more rational that upgrading now.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    193
    Yes, TwiceHorn, I do agree with your reasoning. I think I'll try to sell the GT first - if it sells, great, I will add some and get the bike I like more; if it does not sell, I might ride it for a while.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    13,353
    If you do go for another bike keep an eye out for a frame with Boost 148 rear and a Boost 15x110 fork. That way you can use wider tires and rims for broader terrain capabilities. 2.6 x 29 tires and 35mm inner width rims are one of the choices for tuning.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nauc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,165
    id sell it. save up for something better/lighter

Similar Threads

  1. How heavy is too heavy?
    By ASCTLC in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 06-11-2018, 12:49 PM
  2. Video: "Is your MTB too heavy?"
    By Engineer90 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 105
    Last Post: 05-31-2016, 06:19 PM
  3. How heavy is a "heavy" 29er frame ?
    By manmythlegend in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 07-10-2013, 01:14 PM
  4. Tire suggestions - Not too heavy and not too light
    By Dictatorsaurus in forum 29er Components
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-02-2012, 03:31 PM
  5. How heavy is too heavy?
    By TJBuggy2B in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-21-2011, 01:49 PM

Members who have read this thread: 7

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.